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 John Clark Angus

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John Clark Angus

Birth
Scotland
Death
18 May 1906 (aged 70)
Spanish Fork, Utah County, Utah, USA
Burial
Spanish Fork, Utah County, Utah, USA
Plot
04.32 .06
Memorial ID
10920373 View Source

History of John Clark Angus

John Clark Angus was born November 25, 1835 in Concragie, Perthsire, Scotland (Actual records were found in Clunie, Perthshire, Scotland), the son of John Alexander and Jane Clark Angus. His father's home was congenial and happy. He had one brother and five sisters.

After hearing the Gospel of Jesus Christ preached by the Mormon Elders, John became dissatisfied with the religion of his parents. At the age of eighteen he investigated the Mormon religion, deciding it to be the only true religion he had yet heard. He longed for the privilege of joining the Latter-Day Saint Church, which he did when twenty years of age. He was baptized April 5, 1855, confirmed April 6, 1855, and ordained a teacher in the branch of the Church where he resided in 1856. He held the position of clerk of this same branch from the time he was baptized until he left Scotland.

His joining the Church did not meet with the approval of his parents, but they did not turn against him, although no other members of the family ever embraced the Gospel to his knowledge.

John's father was a tailor by trade. His brother, Alexander, and two of his sisters were tailors. His father worked at his trade until a few years before his death. He lived to be about ninety years of age.

When John was quite young he decided he would like to become a miller. He got a job as an apprentice in a flourmill. While working at this mill he received an "A" Grade Certificate for the making of flour, pearl barley, and oatmeal. He was also a mill wheelwright, as he thoroughly understood all parts of the machinery. He could set up the entire equipment and run a gristmill alone. This was one thing required of him before receiving his certificate. It took him three years to learn his trade.

The desire to come to America and join the Latter-Day Saints in Utah became so strong within John that he bade farewell to his family and friends and left his native land, Scotland, and went directly to Liverpool, from where he set sail on the ship "General George Washington" April 15, 1857, two years after being baptized. He was two months on the Atlantic Ocean. How glad they were to greet the sight of land once more!

After landing in New York he went directly to Iowa City, Iowa by train. Here he immediately began building his own handcart in preparation for crossing the plains. His handcart was made of wood and put together with wooden pegs that he also made. The box was made of rawhide and with each rainstorm it became tighter. Into this little affair he loaded all his earthly possessions and pulled it from Iowa City to Salt Lake City, Utah, a distance of 2,000 miles. It cost him just $45.oo to come from Liverpool, England to Salt Lake City. Upon arriving in Utah he had very little money left and was almost barefooted. He waded every stream of water while crossing the plains, carrying either a frightened child or a woman on his back. He described this trip as a hard and dangerous journey, but everyone enjoyed it greatly. He would have gladly returned to the East to accompany other groups of emigrants over the plains had he been asked to. John crossed plains with Captain Israel Evans Handcart Company arriving in Salt Lake City September 15, 1857, just five months to the day that he set sail from Liverpool. He came with the second handcart company. They were three months crossing the plains. Upon John's arrival in Salt Lake City, he went to work for President John Taylor at Mill Creek, Utah to run a flourmill. He stayed there until the weather became so cold they could not run the mill. President BrighamYoung advised him to go to Springville. He walked all the way and upon arriving there he applied for work at the flourmill which was located on Spring Creek just north from the State Fish Hatchery north of Springville. It was owned by George Stores. John offered to run the mill that night for his supper. The proposition was accepted. His work was satisfactory, and he continued to work all the rest of the winter there. He was paid two bushels of wheat a day, which was worth fifty cents a bushel


This same winter Johnson's Army arrived in Salt Lake going through to California. John traded to this company some of his flour for a suit of clothes and a small calf. This was a first suit of clothes he had purchased in Utah. He said his were so patched he could not find the original pieces. He got himself a buckskin suit for everyday wear.

In order to supply Johnson's Army with flour the mill was forced to run day and night. With the wheat he earned by extra labor, he made it into flour and sold it to the army for $10.00 a hundred pounds.

In 1858 John was ordered to go to Provo, Utah and erect a flourmill. He ran this mill for some time. It was while he was running this mill that he became known as John Angus, the honest miller. Later he helped erect mills from Salt Lake City to Cedar City, failing only once at Gunnison, Utah, when they were driven out by the Indians prior to the Black Hawk war.

While working at the Provo mill, Judge Booth's mother sent 60 cents to the mill to buy some flour and a nice white pillow slip to put the flour in. John filled the slip from his own share of the flour, put the 60 cents in the top of the sack and returned it to Mrs. Booth. He firmly resolved to give every emigrant a sack of flour if they would apply for it. He continued this practice as long as he was a miller.

In the fall of 1861, John became acquainted with a Scottish family by the name of Archibald, who had just arrived in Provo from Scotland. This family consisted of two boys and four girls. It was in Provo that father wooed and married the Archibald's eldest daughter, Betsy Hislop Archibald Orrick, who was a widow with two children. They were married December 6, 1861 by Bishop John Berry and received their endowments at the old Salt Lake Endowment House July 20, 1867.

The Angus family later moved to Spanish Fork where John worked as a miller for Archie Gardner. He ran the first mill and made the first sack of flour in Spanish Fork. Later he ran the mill for the Spanish Fork Cooperative Store and bought the Springville mill and moved it to Spanish Fork where he had formerly purchased a right in the canal for water to run the mill from Allen Adamson. He sold his mill to Andrew Laurence and went again to run the cooperative mill. He ran this mill until it burned down one Sunday morning in 1888.

John belonged to the 19th Quorum of the Seventies, being ordained in 1860. In 1893 he was ordained to the office of High Priest.

At the time the Utah Stake Tabernacle was erected John was a largest individual donor. His aim was to give each missionary in the field $5.00 as a Christmas present. He was eager and willing to help the missionaries at all times. He was a full tithe payer.

He was the father of ten children, three girls and seven boys, also two children by Betsy's first husband. Eleven of these grew to manhood and womanhood, namely:

Christina Orrick Angus Born June 28, 1857

Henry Orrick Angus Born September 10, 1859

John Alexander Angus Born September 14, 1862

Robert Archibald Angus Born June 15, 1864

James Clark Angus Born August 30, 1866

Joseph Fielding Angus Born November 16, 1868 Died January 25,1937

Jane Clark Angus Born February 11, 1871

Agnes Angus Born January 22, 1875 Died February 10, 1934

Archie Angus Born March 5, 1875 Died 1878

Betsey Hislop Angus Born July 4, 1877 Died August 11, 1911

George Q. angus Born August 8, 1879

Wilford W. Angus Born July 14, 1882

For several years father was an invalid suffering from paralysis. He was unable to do anything for himself for three years or more. They moved from the bench to Lake Shore in 1902 where they owned a farm and home, thinking the change might benefit father's health. He died May 14, 1906 at Lake Shore and was buried in Spanish Fork Cemetery.



Parents
Father: John Alexander ANGUS
Mother: Jane Or Jean CLARK

Marriage(s)
Spouse: Betsey Hislop ARCHIBALD Marriage: 6 Dec 1861
Spanish Fork, Utah, Ut

Children not listed below: Christina Angus Ferguson

History of John Clark Angus

John Clark Angus was born November 25, 1835 in Concragie, Perthsire, Scotland (Actual records were found in Clunie, Perthshire, Scotland), the son of John Alexander and Jane Clark Angus. His father's home was congenial and happy. He had one brother and five sisters.

After hearing the Gospel of Jesus Christ preached by the Mormon Elders, John became dissatisfied with the religion of his parents. At the age of eighteen he investigated the Mormon religion, deciding it to be the only true religion he had yet heard. He longed for the privilege of joining the Latter-Day Saint Church, which he did when twenty years of age. He was baptized April 5, 1855, confirmed April 6, 1855, and ordained a teacher in the branch of the Church where he resided in 1856. He held the position of clerk of this same branch from the time he was baptized until he left Scotland.

His joining the Church did not meet with the approval of his parents, but they did not turn against him, although no other members of the family ever embraced the Gospel to his knowledge.

John's father was a tailor by trade. His brother, Alexander, and two of his sisters were tailors. His father worked at his trade until a few years before his death. He lived to be about ninety years of age.

When John was quite young he decided he would like to become a miller. He got a job as an apprentice in a flourmill. While working at this mill he received an "A" Grade Certificate for the making of flour, pearl barley, and oatmeal. He was also a mill wheelwright, as he thoroughly understood all parts of the machinery. He could set up the entire equipment and run a gristmill alone. This was one thing required of him before receiving his certificate. It took him three years to learn his trade.

The desire to come to America and join the Latter-Day Saints in Utah became so strong within John that he bade farewell to his family and friends and left his native land, Scotland, and went directly to Liverpool, from where he set sail on the ship "General George Washington" April 15, 1857, two years after being baptized. He was two months on the Atlantic Ocean. How glad they were to greet the sight of land once more!

After landing in New York he went directly to Iowa City, Iowa by train. Here he immediately began building his own handcart in preparation for crossing the plains. His handcart was made of wood and put together with wooden pegs that he also made. The box was made of rawhide and with each rainstorm it became tighter. Into this little affair he loaded all his earthly possessions and pulled it from Iowa City to Salt Lake City, Utah, a distance of 2,000 miles. It cost him just $45.oo to come from Liverpool, England to Salt Lake City. Upon arriving in Utah he had very little money left and was almost barefooted. He waded every stream of water while crossing the plains, carrying either a frightened child or a woman on his back. He described this trip as a hard and dangerous journey, but everyone enjoyed it greatly. He would have gladly returned to the East to accompany other groups of emigrants over the plains had he been asked to. John crossed plains with Captain Israel Evans Handcart Company arriving in Salt Lake City September 15, 1857, just five months to the day that he set sail from Liverpool. He came with the second handcart company. They were three months crossing the plains. Upon John's arrival in Salt Lake City, he went to work for President John Taylor at Mill Creek, Utah to run a flourmill. He stayed there until the weather became so cold they could not run the mill. President BrighamYoung advised him to go to Springville. He walked all the way and upon arriving there he applied for work at the flourmill which was located on Spring Creek just north from the State Fish Hatchery north of Springville. It was owned by George Stores. John offered to run the mill that night for his supper. The proposition was accepted. His work was satisfactory, and he continued to work all the rest of the winter there. He was paid two bushels of wheat a day, which was worth fifty cents a bushel


This same winter Johnson's Army arrived in Salt Lake going through to California. John traded to this company some of his flour for a suit of clothes and a small calf. This was a first suit of clothes he had purchased in Utah. He said his were so patched he could not find the original pieces. He got himself a buckskin suit for everyday wear.

In order to supply Johnson's Army with flour the mill was forced to run day and night. With the wheat he earned by extra labor, he made it into flour and sold it to the army for $10.00 a hundred pounds.

In 1858 John was ordered to go to Provo, Utah and erect a flourmill. He ran this mill for some time. It was while he was running this mill that he became known as John Angus, the honest miller. Later he helped erect mills from Salt Lake City to Cedar City, failing only once at Gunnison, Utah, when they were driven out by the Indians prior to the Black Hawk war.

While working at the Provo mill, Judge Booth's mother sent 60 cents to the mill to buy some flour and a nice white pillow slip to put the flour in. John filled the slip from his own share of the flour, put the 60 cents in the top of the sack and returned it to Mrs. Booth. He firmly resolved to give every emigrant a sack of flour if they would apply for it. He continued this practice as long as he was a miller.

In the fall of 1861, John became acquainted with a Scottish family by the name of Archibald, who had just arrived in Provo from Scotland. This family consisted of two boys and four girls. It was in Provo that father wooed and married the Archibald's eldest daughter, Betsy Hislop Archibald Orrick, who was a widow with two children. They were married December 6, 1861 by Bishop John Berry and received their endowments at the old Salt Lake Endowment House July 20, 1867.

The Angus family later moved to Spanish Fork where John worked as a miller for Archie Gardner. He ran the first mill and made the first sack of flour in Spanish Fork. Later he ran the mill for the Spanish Fork Cooperative Store and bought the Springville mill and moved it to Spanish Fork where he had formerly purchased a right in the canal for water to run the mill from Allen Adamson. He sold his mill to Andrew Laurence and went again to run the cooperative mill. He ran this mill until it burned down one Sunday morning in 1888.

John belonged to the 19th Quorum of the Seventies, being ordained in 1860. In 1893 he was ordained to the office of High Priest.

At the time the Utah Stake Tabernacle was erected John was a largest individual donor. His aim was to give each missionary in the field $5.00 as a Christmas present. He was eager and willing to help the missionaries at all times. He was a full tithe payer.

He was the father of ten children, three girls and seven boys, also two children by Betsy's first husband. Eleven of these grew to manhood and womanhood, namely:

Christina Orrick Angus Born June 28, 1857

Henry Orrick Angus Born September 10, 1859

John Alexander Angus Born September 14, 1862

Robert Archibald Angus Born June 15, 1864

James Clark Angus Born August 30, 1866

Joseph Fielding Angus Born November 16, 1868 Died January 25,1937

Jane Clark Angus Born February 11, 1871

Agnes Angus Born January 22, 1875 Died February 10, 1934

Archie Angus Born March 5, 1875 Died 1878

Betsey Hislop Angus Born July 4, 1877 Died August 11, 1911

George Q. angus Born August 8, 1879

Wilford W. Angus Born July 14, 1882

For several years father was an invalid suffering from paralysis. He was unable to do anything for himself for three years or more. They moved from the bench to Lake Shore in 1902 where they owned a farm and home, thinking the change might benefit father's health. He died May 14, 1906 at Lake Shore and was buried in Spanish Fork Cemetery.



Parents
Father: John Alexander ANGUS
Mother: Jane Or Jean CLARK

Marriage(s)
Spouse: Betsey Hislop ARCHIBALD Marriage: 6 Dec 1861
Spanish Fork, Utah, Ut

Children not listed below: Christina Angus Ferguson


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