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 Cyrus Edwards

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Cyrus Edwards

Birth
Montgomery Manor, Howard County, Maryland, USA
Death 31 Aug 1877 (aged 84)
Alton, Madison County, Illinois, USA
Burial Alton, Madison County, Illinois, USA
Memorial ID 108410069 View Source
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Source: Alton Telegraph, September 6, 1877

A vast audience gathered at the Baptist church in Upper Alton, Sunday afternoon, to pay the last tribute of respect to the memory of the Hon. Cyrus Edwards. The sad occurrence had drawn together the relatives and friends of the deceased, from far and near, while the citizens turned out almost en masse to testify by their presence their sense of loss and sympathy with the afflicted family. Many of the old pioneers of the county, who had been Mr. Edwards' associates in public and private enterprises, in days long past, or his warm adherents in stormy political times, were there also; yet none of these had, "by reason of strength," reached the fourscore years and more which their venerable friend had attained. The pulpit was occupied by Rev. Mr. Morrill, the pastor of the church; Dr. Kendrick, Prof. Leverett, Dr. Bulkley and Dr. Johnson, all of whom participated in the simple and unostentatious services. The addresses made on the occasion were by Mr. Morrill and Dr. Bulkley. The former took for his text the last verse of the 91st Psalm, which had previously been read by Prof. Leverett: "With long life will I satisfy him, and show him my salvation." He dwelt mainly upon the religious character of the deceased, and exhibited his life as a practical exemplification of the test. The speaker narrated his last interview with Mr. Edwards and read the letter, detailing his religious experience, which he wrote to the Baptist church, of Upper Alton, when applying for membership in that body four years previous. Mr. Morrill was followed by Dr. Bulkley, who had been acquainted with Mr. Edwards for thirty-five years. He spoke briefly of the distinguished public career of the departed, of his purity of life, of his incorruptibility, of his great public services, of his interest in the cause of education, and his benevolence to the college. He dwelt with special gratitude on the personal kindness he had received from Mr. Edwards, of his genial manners, conversational abilities and intellectual force. In closing, he reverted to Mr. Edwards' religious character and experience, as revealed in personal interviews. The exercises at the church, closed with the singing of the hymn, "I Would Not Live Alway," by the choir. The remains were then borne from the church by the pall bearers, Messrs. John L. Blair, Jos. Gillespie, L. J. Clawson, Levi Davis, H. L. Field, and O. L. Castle. The procession to the cemetery, was, doubtless, the longest ever seen in Upper Alton. At the grave the services were concluded with brief remarks and prayer by Dr. Kendrick. The Misses Quigley, granddaughters of the deceased, then decked the new-made mound with flowers, and placed thereon a beautiful floral anchor. The rites were ended just before the close of day, and the aged statesman's form was left to rest beneath the sod of the State he had served so long and loved so well. The tall forest trees cast lengthened shadows over the grass in that peaceful home of the dead. The splendor of a perfect day was fading in the depths of a cloudless sky. So had his life passed away. Not ended at dawn, or at noonday, or in clouds and storm; but rounded, symmetrical and complete, it drew to its close in the undimmed brightness of full consummation.


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