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 Bruce Keener Holloway

Bruce Keener Holloway

Birth
Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee, USA
Death 30 Sep 1999 (aged 87)
Orlando, Orange County, Florida, USA
Burial , Specifically: University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida
Memorial ID 10795 · View Source
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US Air Force General. After graduating from Knoxville High School in 1929, he studied engineering for two years at the University of Tennessee, and attended the Marion Military Institute in Marion, Alabama, in preparation for his appointment to the US Military Academy at West Point, New York in 1933. He graduated from West Point in 1937 with a commission as a second lieutenant in the cavalry but was soon assigned to the US Army Air Corps and attended flying training at Kelly Field (now Kelly Air Force Base), Texas, receiving his pilot wings in 1938. His first assignments were with the 6th Pursuit Squadron and the 18th Pursuit Group at Wheeler Field, Hawaii, as a flight leader. He returned to the United States in 1941 to take a postgraduate course in aeronautical engineering at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. In May 1942, after the United States declared war on Japan, he was sent to China to observe General Claire Chennault's American Volunteer Group, the Flying Tigers, and flew four combat missions with them. After the Flying Tigers were disbanded and officially absorbed into the 14th Air Force of the Army Air Corps in July 1942, be became the commander of the 76th Fighter Squadron and in January 1943, be became the Operations Officer of the 23rd Fighter Group, replacing then Colonel Robert L. Scott, Jr, who is remembered for his wartime memoir "God is My Co-Pilot." During his tour with the 23rd Fighter Group he flew 110 combat missions and became a double fighter ace, shooting down 13 Japanese aircraft. He returned to the United States in 1944 and worked fighter requirements at the Pentagon until the end of World War II. In 1946 he commanded the 412th Fighter Group, the first US Army Air Force jet equipped fighter unit with the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star. He then attended the Air Command and Staff College at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, graduating in 1947. In 1950, he was selected to attend the National War College at Fort McNair in Washington DC, graduating in 1951. From 1951 to 1955, he progressed through key staff assignments at Headquarters Air Force and was promoted to brigadier general in 1953. In 1957, he was assigned to the Tactical Air Command where he performed duty as the deputy commander of 9th and 12th Air Forces. In 1959, he was promoted to the rank of major general and he returned to Headquarters Air Force as the Director of Operational Requirements, where he was highly involved in the preparation and evaluation of proposals for many new aircraft and missiles. In 1961 he was promoted to lieutenant general and selected as the deputy commander in chief of US Strike Command at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, with additional responsibilities as deputy commander in chief of the Middle East/Southern Asia and Africa South of the Sahara Command. On August 1, 1965, he was promoted to the rank of general and became the commander in chief of US Air Forces in Europe, serving in that capacity until August 1, 1966, when he was appointed to the position of Vice Chief of Staff of the US Air Force, Washington DC. On August 1, 1968, he became the commander of Strategic Air Command at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, becoming the first fighter pilot with no previous bomber experience to assume that all-bomber and missile command. He retired from that position on May 1, 1972, with 35 years of continuous military service in the US Army Air Corps and Air Force. Among his military decorations and awards include the Army Distinguished Service Medal, the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, the Silver Star, the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross, and the Air Medal. His foreign decorations and awards include the Order of the Sacred Tripod (China), Order of the Cloud and Banner, the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany with Star and Sash, the Most Notable Order of the Crown of Thailand, First Class, Knight Grand Cross, the Order of Aeronautical Merit (Brazil), the French Legion d'Honneur, Order of Commander, and Honorary Pilot Wings from the Republic of China, Federal Republic of Germany, Royal Thai Air Force, and Vietnam. After retiring from the Air Force he moved to Orlando, Florida, where he served as an aerospace consultant from 1973 to 1974 and also served on several boards of directors and boards of trustees. He was the co-manager and operator of the small private "Possom Flats and Eastern Railroad," where he gave rides to local elementary schoolchildren. He died of heart failure.

Bio by: William Bjornstad


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 11 Jul 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 10795
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Bruce Keener Holloway (1 Sep 1912–30 Sep 1999), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10795, ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) , who reports a University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida.