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 Audley Dean Nicols Sr.

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Audley Dean Nicols Sr.

Birth
Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death
13 Nov 1941 (aged 66)
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA
Burial
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA
Memorial ID
106762166 View Source

Audley Dean Nicols Dies At 66
His Canvas Caught Southwest Colors

Death came early today to Audley Dean Nicols, nationally-known El Paso artist.
He was 66. Funeral arrangements are pending with Kaster & Maxon Mortuary. El Paso artists today planned to attend the funeral in a body.
Mr. Nicols' desert landscapes were the first which pictured the peculiar light, the changing color and the bare mountains which take hold of all "tenderfeet" who come to this country. His desert painting, begun 24 years ago, started an epidemic of desert landscapes which has not abated. His work is prized today by owners throughout the nation.
Audley Dean Nicols came to the Southwest about 24 years ago from Sewickley, Pa. He first went to Tucson where he painted for several seasons. He came to the Southwest because he had tired of painting the lush eastern landcapes. He had started as an illustrator and portrait
painter.
The sand and the sagebrush and the blue mountains of this country caught his imagination. Naturally reserved with the personal qualities of a mystic, he practically "buried" himself in the desert in those first seasons in Arizona. He went alone far into the desert and camped for weeks. He frequently took trips with the priests of that section
during the terrific heat of the days and the cold of desert nights to get the effects he wanted on his canvas. He wrote numerous articles on the desert. Liked Our Climate
Mr. Nichols (sic) came to El Paso with his family 20 yeras ago intending to stop here temporarily. He liked the climate here and remained, building his rock home at the foot of Mt. Franklin at 2813 Fort boulevard. His house then was on the desert. The town has expanded to his door.
The artist was in the height of demand and production in those years. Prominent mining and railroad men who came to this section on business liked his work. He was paid big prices for paintings in which he immortalized "Ship of the Desert," "Superstition Mountain," "The Pass," "Signal Peak," "Cave Creek in the Chiricahua Mountains." His first
desert landscape was bought in Chicago by the late C. W. Post, breakfast food manufacturer. His second painting was bought by Mr. Post in Washington.

Many El Pasoans have his paintings in their homes. One hangs in the Detroit Athletic Club.

During those years when his paintings were in demand, interest in the painter himself was keen, Mr. NIcols remainded a mystery except to a few close friends with whom he loved to exchanged stories of the Southwest. One of those friends was the late General Robert L. Howze, commanding officer of Ft. Bliss.

Mr. Nichols Never gave an interview. He never solicited an order. He never duplicated a painting. For the past few years, he has been ill staying close in the home with its view of the mountains and the El Paso mesa and valley.

He is survived by his widow; a son, Dean Nicols of El Paso, and a daughter, Mary Elizabeth, 10.

Burial will be in Restlawn Cemetery at the edge of the desert he loved.

El Paso Herald Post, 13 Nov 1941

Audley Dean Nicols Dies At 66
His Canvas Caught Southwest Colors

Death came early today to Audley Dean Nicols, nationally-known El Paso artist.
He was 66. Funeral arrangements are pending with Kaster & Maxon Mortuary. El Paso artists today planned to attend the funeral in a body.
Mr. Nicols' desert landscapes were the first which pictured the peculiar light, the changing color and the bare mountains which take hold of all "tenderfeet" who come to this country. His desert painting, begun 24 years ago, started an epidemic of desert landscapes which has not abated. His work is prized today by owners throughout the nation.
Audley Dean Nicols came to the Southwest about 24 years ago from Sewickley, Pa. He first went to Tucson where he painted for several seasons. He came to the Southwest because he had tired of painting the lush eastern landcapes. He had started as an illustrator and portrait
painter.
The sand and the sagebrush and the blue mountains of this country caught his imagination. Naturally reserved with the personal qualities of a mystic, he practically "buried" himself in the desert in those first seasons in Arizona. He went alone far into the desert and camped for weeks. He frequently took trips with the priests of that section
during the terrific heat of the days and the cold of desert nights to get the effects he wanted on his canvas. He wrote numerous articles on the desert. Liked Our Climate
Mr. Nichols (sic) came to El Paso with his family 20 yeras ago intending to stop here temporarily. He liked the climate here and remained, building his rock home at the foot of Mt. Franklin at 2813 Fort boulevard. His house then was on the desert. The town has expanded to his door.
The artist was in the height of demand and production in those years. Prominent mining and railroad men who came to this section on business liked his work. He was paid big prices for paintings in which he immortalized "Ship of the Desert," "Superstition Mountain," "The Pass," "Signal Peak," "Cave Creek in the Chiricahua Mountains." His first
desert landscape was bought in Chicago by the late C. W. Post, breakfast food manufacturer. His second painting was bought by Mr. Post in Washington.

Many El Pasoans have his paintings in their homes. One hangs in the Detroit Athletic Club.

During those years when his paintings were in demand, interest in the painter himself was keen, Mr. NIcols remainded a mystery except to a few close friends with whom he loved to exchanged stories of the Southwest. One of those friends was the late General Robert L. Howze, commanding officer of Ft. Bliss.

Mr. Nichols Never gave an interview. He never solicited an order. He never duplicated a painting. For the past few years, he has been ill staying close in the home with its view of the mountains and the El Paso mesa and valley.

He is survived by his widow; a son, Dean Nicols of El Paso, and a daughter, Mary Elizabeth, 10.

Burial will be in Restlawn Cemetery at the edge of the desert he loved.

El Paso Herald Post, 13 Nov 1941


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