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 Hunter S. Thompson

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Hunter S. Thompson Famous memorial

Birth
Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA
Death
20 Feb 2005 (aged 67)
Woody Creek, Pitkin County, Colorado, USA
Burial
Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA
Memorial ID
10504755 View Source

Journalist and Author. Internationally recognized "Gonzo" journalist, he is best known for his 1972 classic "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas;" also credited with pioneering gonzo journalism - a style of writing that breaks traditional rules of news reporting and is purposefully slanted. His eccentric personality and personal adventures were the basis for his political and cultural criticism of the United States in the 1970s. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, he was known for an explosive writing style that employed "action verbs" to comically spin outlandish tales that are completely unbelievable, yet providing a unique viewpoint to accurately describe the underlying reality at hand. His stories became so colorfully contrived that they easily slipped into the realm of fiction, although the basic premise of the story was often accurate. Other books he wrote include: "Hell's Angels" (a non-fiction work that almost cost him his life), "The Proud Highway," and his most recent effort, "Hey Rube: Blood Sport, the Bush Doctrine, and The Downward Spiral of Dumbness."
On August 20, 2005, a private memorial service was held.
Thompson's ashes were fired from a cannon, accompanied by red, white, blue, and green fireworks. The celebratory music selections were Norman Greenbaum's "Spirit in the Sky" and Bob Dylan's "Mister Tambourine Man".

Journalist and Author. Internationally recognized "Gonzo" journalist, he is best known for his 1972 classic "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas;" also credited with pioneering gonzo journalism - a style of writing that breaks traditional rules of news reporting and is purposefully slanted. His eccentric personality and personal adventures were the basis for his political and cultural criticism of the United States in the 1970s. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, he was known for an explosive writing style that employed "action verbs" to comically spin outlandish tales that are completely unbelievable, yet providing a unique viewpoint to accurately describe the underlying reality at hand. His stories became so colorfully contrived that they easily slipped into the realm of fiction, although the basic premise of the story was often accurate. Other books he wrote include: "Hell's Angels" (a non-fiction work that almost cost him his life), "The Proud Highway," and his most recent effort, "Hey Rube: Blood Sport, the Bush Doctrine, and The Downward Spiral of Dumbness."
On August 20, 2005, a private memorial service was held.
Thompson's ashes were fired from a cannon, accompanied by red, white, blue, and green fireworks. The celebratory music selections were Norman Greenbaum's "Spirit in the Sky" and Bob Dylan's "Mister Tambourine Man".

Bio by: Fred Beisser


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Fred Beisser
  • Added: 20 Feb 2005
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 10504755
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/10504755/hunter-s-thompson: accessed ), memorial page for Hunter S. Thompson (18 Jul 1937–20 Feb 2005), Find a Grave Memorial ID 10504755, citing Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.