The Photo Request has been fulfilled.

 
 Barbara Frum

Barbara Frum

Birth
Niagara Falls, Niagara County, New York, USA
Death 26 Mar 1992 (aged 54)
Toronto, Toronto Municipality, Ontario, Canada
Burial*
*–This is the original burial site
Vaughan, York Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada
Memorial ID 10491 · View Source
Suggest Edits

Canadian Radio and Television Journalist. She is remembered as the host of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Radio show "As It Happens" and the CBC Television show "The Journal." She was born Barbara Rosberg on September 8, 1937 in Niagara Falls, New York, the oldest of three children, to Jewish parents. Her father emigrated to Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada from Poland where he owned and operated Rosberg's Department Store. She grew up in Niagara Falls, Ontario and studied history at the University of Toronto in Ontario and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in 1959. Two years prior she married Toronto dentist Murray Frum who later became a real estate developer. After her graduation she undertook volunteer work in the community and began writing for the Toronto Star newspaper as a freelancer, specializing in social issues stories. In 1971 she joined CBC Radio as one of the first hosts of "As It Happens," a newsmagazine program which used the telephone to conduct live interviews with newsmakers and other witnesses to news events, as well as quirky human-interest stories. Her skills as a tough, incisive and well-informed interviewer quickly made the program one of CBC Radio's most popular and enduring programs (still airing today, in virtually the same format), and she continued to host it until 1981. Between October 1974 and July 1975, she hosted her own self-titled talk show, first locally broadcast in Toronto until May 1975 before the program moved to the national CBC network for seven shows in June and July 1975. The shows featured both interviews with personalities and special segments devoted to isolated topics. In 1981 CBC Television created "The Journal," a newsmagazine series which would follow "The National" each night, and she and Mary Lou Finlay were hired as the show's hosts. On January 11, 1982, the show debuted as a showcase for features which delved more deeply into the day's news than the traditional newscast format of "The National." The show included field reports, short documentaries, public forums, debates, business, sports, and arts and science news, but her interviews were the show's centerpiece, and made it one of Canadian television's most popular programs. After the first year, she became the sole host of the program, although Finlay continued to be associated with the program as a reporter and documentarian. She interviewed many notable people, including British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and South African President Nelson Mandela. She angered many when, on December 7, 1989 on "The Journal," she refused to acknowledge that the December 6, 1989 École Polytechnique Massacre (or Montreal Massacre), by a killer who proclaimed as he shot and stabbed women, "I hate feminists!", was an attack on women and feminism saying, "Why do we diminish it by suggesting that it was an act against just one group?" She was also the inspiration for the muppet "Barbara Plum", host of "The Notebook", on "Canadian Sesame Street" (later reworked as "Sesame Park"). In the Canadian animated series "The Raccoons," she portrayed a reporter called "Barbara LaFrum", who interviewed Cyril Sneer after his pigs told her of his unsavory business practices. For her work in journalism, she received four Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists (ACTRA) Awards, won the National Press Club of Canada Award for Outstanding Contribution to Canadian Journalism in 1975, and was named to the Order of Canada in 1979. In 1974 she was diagnosed with leukemia and succumbed to the disease in Toronto on March 26, 1992, at the age of 54. On the evening of her death, virtually the entire broadcasts of both "The National" and "The Journal" were a tribute to her and a retrospective of her career. The atrium in the CBC Centre in Toronto was named 'Barbara Frum Atrium' in her honor. A branch of the Toronto Public Library, located at 20 Covington Rd in a largely Jewish neighborhood, and donated by her husband, was opened shortly after her death, and named 'Barbara Frum Library' in her honor. In 1996 her daughter Linda, a conservative author and journalist, wrote a best-selling biography of her mother titled "Barbara Frum: A Daughter's Memoir." In 1999 her image was in the foreground on the Canadian stamp honoring CBC. A television biography, "The Life and Times of Barbara Frum," was broadcast on CBC in 2002, and a day lily has been named the 'Barbara Frum Day Lily' in recognition of her enthusiasm for gardening.

Bio by: William Bjornstad


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

How famous was Barbara Frum?

Current rating:

53 votes

Sign-in to cast your vote.

  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Added: 9 Jul 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 10491
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Barbara Frum (8 Sep 1937–26 Mar 1992), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10491, citing Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Vaughan, York Regional Municipality, Ontario, Canada ; Maintained by Find A Grave .