Samuel St. Clair Early

Death of Ex-Sheriff Samuel S. Early.
After confinement to house and bed
since-the fall of 1880, the death messenger
kindly intervened and freed the
spirit of Samuel St. Clair Early, thus
ending a life upon earth which mental
impairment and physical ailliction had
deprived of its attractions and its pleasures.
Without pain or struggle, he
passed into the sleep that knows no
waking on Saturday night, January
7th, 1882, at 12 o'clock, at the age of 57
year.«, 2 months and 4 days.
Mr. Early was well known throughout
Jackson county. During the past
thirty years, until his retirement
from the Sheriff's office in November,
1878, he figured prominently in the political
history of the county, and was
honored with several important public
positions by the Democratic party,
whose ])rinciples he ever espoused and
in whose battles he ever actively euengaged.
The following biographical sketch of
Mr. Early we find in the Jackson County
Atlas. It gives the leading events
of his life, up to 1877, fully and accurately,
and we therefore transfer it to
our columns:

Samuel St. Clair Early, Sheriff of
Jackson County, was born in Blount
County, Tennessee, iSTovember 3, 1824,
and came to Washington County, IndiaiKi,
in 1840. After a residence of nine
years in Washington County, Mr.
Early removed to Driftwood Township,
Jackson County, and engaged in farming
and teaching school. In 1852 Mr.
Early entered into political life, and became
the Democratic candidate for
Sheriff. He was little known in the
county at that timd, and his race for
the nomination was a surprise to many;
but in that contest he exhibited those
powers of endearing people to him
which proved so effective in after years.
He was elected Sheriff in 1852, and reelected
in. 1854. In 1856 he was chosen
for the lower house of the Legislature,
and re-elected two years later, serving
in the special season of 1858, and in the
regular session of 1853. Imiiiedlately
following this, iia 1860, Mr. Early was
elected Treasurer of Jackson County",
and re-elected to the same office in 1862.
About this time Mr. Early engaged in
merchandising at Brownstown, with
W. W. Wamsley, since deceased. On
his retirement from the Treasurer's office
Mr. Early was chosen Principal of
White River Academy, situated at
Brownstown, and continued in that
capacity for two 3'ears, subsequently
engaging largely in the life insurance
business.
During the terms of Sheriff Bower,
Mr. Early was chief deputy in tho
Sheriff's office, and in 1874 became once
more a candidate for the sheriffalty.
He was nominated by the Democracy,
and elected, and i-e-elected in 1876.
Samuel S. Early has, perhaps, had
more political experience than any
other person in Jackson County, having
filled a large number of official positions,
and al^-ays to the entii-e satisfaction
of the people. He has rt^sided in
Driftwood, Carr, Owen and Brownstown
Townships, in .lackson County,
and is thoroughly acquainted with the
people. He is a true friend, an efficient
officer, kind to the poor and oppressed,
and a man of superior intelligence. Mr.
Early has not been enjoying good
health of late years, but his great will
power keeps him constantly at his post
of duty. Few men have passed
through such an eventful life as Sheriff
Early, and none have borne so many
honors with so much plain, unassumed
modesty.
On the 4th of IMarch, 1849, Mr. Early
was united in marriage with Miss Bernette
Beem, daughter of Michael Beem,
deceased, by whom he had six children,
four of whom are living. She died in
July, 1860. Mr. Early remained a widower
until February 24, 1862, when he
was married to Mary E. Boyd, by
whom he had two children, who died
in infancy. His present wife survives
h i o K
Samuel S. Early was a man of iron
will and unyielding determination, one
whose unflinching fidelity to his friends
was only equaled by the unrelenting
pertinacity with which he would combat
his enemies. In whatever undertaking
he engaged, he was bold, outspoken
and manly, and when he antagonized
any person or any thing, he did
it openly and above-board, leaving coneequences
to take care of themselves.
Socially he was urbane and convivial,
and a most agreeable companicni.
Although a believer iu the christian
religion, he was not identified with any
church. -He was for many years a devoted
member of the Independent Order
of Odd Fellows, and before btricken
down with disease the lodge room
was as a sacred retreat to him, and he
rarely was absent from a meeting. He
had tilled every position in the Subordinate
JLodge and was a member of the
Grand Lodge of the State, in which he
had upon various occasions served upon
important committees.
The funeral took place on Monday
morning. The body was taken in
charge by Brownstown Lodge, No. 488,
L O. O. F., of which Mr. Early was a
charter member, and borne to the Court
House, where the impressive ceremonies
prescribed by the new ritual wore performed,
followed by a very appropriate
discourse delivered by Rev. Virgil W.
Tevis, at the conclusion of which an
opportunity was afforded the large audience
to view the remains. The procession
was then re-formed, and to the
music of a funeral march played by the
Ewing Band, the cortege moved to the
depot, thence by special train to Medora,
and thence to Heighten Hill Burying
Ground, where all that was mortal
of Samuel St. Clair Early was lain to
rest by the side of his first wife and four
children, who had preceded him to the
other world

Brownstown Banner January 12, 1882


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  • Created by: PR
  • Added: 27 Jan 2013
  • Find A Grave Memorial 104263187
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Samuel St. Clair Early (1830–7 Jan 1882), Find A Grave Memorial no. 104263187, citing Beem Heighten Hill Cemetery, Medora, Jackson County, Indiana, USA ; Maintained by PR (contributor 47037475) .