Joseph Claypoole Clark

Joseph Claypoole Clark

Birth
Mount Holly, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
Death 3 Apr 1906 (aged 80)
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, USA
Burial Mount Holly, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA
Plot Division B, Section B, Lot 61, Block 4, Grave 7
Memorial ID 10324867 · View Source
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Civil War Union Army Officer. Appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York by Congressman George Sykes, he entered there in 1844 and graduated 9th out of 43 in 1848. First posted as a 2nd Lieutenant in Battery C, 3rd United States Artillery, less than a year later he was transferred to Battery C of the 4th United States Artillery, and would go on to serve in garrison duty at Fort Wood in Louisiana, Fort Mifflin in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina and Fort Hamilton in New York City, New York. Promoted to 1st Lieutenant in December 1850, he would serve through the next decade as a member of the United States Coastal Survey, on the American Frontier in post duties, and in expeditions against the Mormons in the Utah Territory. When the Civil War began he was recalled to the East, promoted Captain in May 1861, and was assigned to command Battery E of the 4th United States Artillery. He led his battery in combat for the first time at the June 9 1862 Battle of Port Republic in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, where Confederate forces under Major General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson defeated a Union Army force under Brigadier General Erastus B. Tyler. He would later command his battery at the August 1862 Battle of 2nd Bull Run and September 1862 Battle of South Mountain. On September 17, 1862 at the Battle of Antietam his battery was part of Brigadier General Samuel Sturgis' II Division of Major General Ambrose E. Burnside's IX Corps, which during the later hours of the battle was part of the Union Army left flank in the Lower Bridge area. His command supported General Burnside's attack and capture of the bridge (known afterwards as "Burnside's Bridge") and the subsequent assault on the Confederate right flank. After his battery crossed the bridge and was posted along the Otto Farm Lane, he was engaging in covering the Union forward movements when he received four wounds - three in the legs and one in the hand. He convalesced for eight months, but was rendered unfit for field service. In August 1863 he was assigned to West Point as an assistant Philosophical Department professor. On July 26, 1866 he was promoted to Major, given the brevets of Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, and retired from the Regular Army. He retained his Military Academy professorship until 1870, then served as a mathematics professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. From 1876 to 1878 he served as Deputy Governor of the Soldiers' Home in Washington, DC, resigning and retiring for good when his Antietam wounds reopened and debilitated him. He passed away in Philadelphia in 1906.

Bio by: Russ Dodge


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Russ Dodge
  • Added: 14 Jan 2005
  • Find A Grave Memorial 10324867
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Joseph Claypoole Clark (28 Nov 1825–3 Apr 1906), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10324867, citing Saint Andrews Graveyard, Mount Holly, Burlington County, New Jersey, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave .