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James Franklin McKenzie I

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James Franklin McKenzie I

Birth
Prairie Lea, Caldwell County, Texas, USA
Death
4 Mar 1939 (aged 65)
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA
Burial
El Paso, El Paso County, Texas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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McKENZIE, HON. J. F.
Hon. J. F. McKenzie is one of the most talented and prominent of the members of the Reeves County bar, and he is also a member of a family prominent in the pioneer life and history of Texas. Thomas N. McKenzie, his father, came to this state from Henderson County, Tennessee, in 1839. He was then but a lad of eleven, and the journey hither with his parents was made by boat down the Tennessee and Mississippi rivers, thence across the gulf to Matagorda Bay, landing at the old town of Linnville, and they were not there long until the town was sacked and burned by the Comanche Indians, the family barely escaping with their lives by taking boats and rowing out in the bay. On this same raid the Indians burned the town of Victoria.
J. F. McKenzie, his son, born March 18, 1873, at Prairie Lea, in Caldwell County, was reared at the home in Guadalupe County and received his educational training in the country schools, A. and M. College of Texas and in the Vanderbilt University at Nashville. He prepared for the law principally in the office of F. M. Etheridge in Dallas, and was admitted to the bar in that city, and forming a partnership with R. E. L. Saner, he practiced in Dallas until moving in 1898 to Fort Stockton in Pecos, where he established the McKenzie ranch on the Escondido creek in that county. This is one of the best ranches in western Texas and the McKenzie brothers are noted for their successful enterprises in the cattle business. They have had a large and varied experience in this line in the west, they having been among the first to establish headquarters on the southern plains. They had an outfit in Andrews County in its early days, and moving from there farther north, on the line of Texas and New Mexico, they established a large ranch, and afterwards they located permanently at the Pecos County ranch. While at Fort Stockton, J. F. McKenzie was elected and served as the county judge and coming from there to Pecos in 1903 he has since been actively engaged in the practice of law and identified with the professional life of this city. He was elected and served as a member of the Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth legislatures, representing the Ninety-ninth legislative district. He is an able lawyer and commands a large practice, and he also owns valuable property interests in the Pecos country.
Mr. McKenzie married Blanche Terrell, a member of the Seguin branch of the well-known Terrell family of Texas. Their two sons are James F. and Terrell McKenzie. Source: A History of Central and Western Texas, Vol 1, Captain B. B. Paddock, The Lewis Publishing Company, New York, 1911
McKENZIE, HON. J. F.
Hon. J. F. McKenzie is one of the most talented and prominent of the members of the Reeves County bar, and he is also a member of a family prominent in the pioneer life and history of Texas. Thomas N. McKenzie, his father, came to this state from Henderson County, Tennessee, in 1839. He was then but a lad of eleven, and the journey hither with his parents was made by boat down the Tennessee and Mississippi rivers, thence across the gulf to Matagorda Bay, landing at the old town of Linnville, and they were not there long until the town was sacked and burned by the Comanche Indians, the family barely escaping with their lives by taking boats and rowing out in the bay. On this same raid the Indians burned the town of Victoria.
J. F. McKenzie, his son, born March 18, 1873, at Prairie Lea, in Caldwell County, was reared at the home in Guadalupe County and received his educational training in the country schools, A. and M. College of Texas and in the Vanderbilt University at Nashville. He prepared for the law principally in the office of F. M. Etheridge in Dallas, and was admitted to the bar in that city, and forming a partnership with R. E. L. Saner, he practiced in Dallas until moving in 1898 to Fort Stockton in Pecos, where he established the McKenzie ranch on the Escondido creek in that county. This is one of the best ranches in western Texas and the McKenzie brothers are noted for their successful enterprises in the cattle business. They have had a large and varied experience in this line in the west, they having been among the first to establish headquarters on the southern plains. They had an outfit in Andrews County in its early days, and moving from there farther north, on the line of Texas and New Mexico, they established a large ranch, and afterwards they located permanently at the Pecos County ranch. While at Fort Stockton, J. F. McKenzie was elected and served as the county judge and coming from there to Pecos in 1903 he has since been actively engaged in the practice of law and identified with the professional life of this city. He was elected and served as a member of the Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth legislatures, representing the Ninety-ninth legislative district. He is an able lawyer and commands a large practice, and he also owns valuable property interests in the Pecos country.
Mr. McKenzie married Blanche Terrell, a member of the Seguin branch of the well-known Terrell family of Texas. Their two sons are James F. and Terrell McKenzie. Source: A History of Central and Western Texas, Vol 1, Captain B. B. Paddock, The Lewis Publishing Company, New York, 1911


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