Chief Dan George

Chief Dan George

Original Name Geswanouth Slahoot
Birth
North Vancouver, Greater Vancouver Regional District, British Columbia, Canada
Death 23 Sep 1981 (aged 82)
Vancouver, Greater Vancouver Regional District, British Columbia, Canada
Burial North Vancouver, Greater Vancouver Regional District, British Columbia, Canada
Memorial ID 10211109 · View Source
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Actor. A native of North Vancouver, British Columbia, he was Chief of the Squamish Band of the Salish Indian Tribe of Burrard Inlet, British Columbia, and a highly respected actor of both American actors and Canadian actors. Born 'Geswanouth Slahhot,' George had also worked as a logger, longshoreman, construction worker, and a school bus driver. In 1960, George began his acting career when he auditioned for the part of 'Old Antoine' for the television series, "Cariboo County," and won it. George played the role from 1960 to 1967. George then began a long and successful career on both stage, on television, and in films. Among his other projects were the films, "Smith" (1969), "A Bon Pied, Bon Oeil" (1972), "The Special London Bridge Special" (1972), "Cancel My Reservation" (1972), "A Different Drum" (1974), "Chief Dan George Speaks" (1974), "Alien Thunder" (1974), "Harry And Tonto" (1974), "The Bears And I" (1974), "Cold Journey" (1975), "The Outlaw Josey Wales" (1976), "Shadow Of The Hawk" (1976), "Americathon" (1979), "Spirit Of The Wind", "Nothing Personal" (1980), and his television appearances, "The Incredible Hulk", "Matt And Jenny", "McCloud", "V.I.P.-Schaukel", "Marcus Welby, M.D.", Cade's County", "Bonanza", "The High Chaparral", "The Beachcombers", and "Centennial." In 1970, George received the nomination of Best Supporting Actor for his role as 'Old Lodge Skins' in the film, "Little Big Man." George also became a stage actor appearing in the play, "The Ectasy Of Rita Joe" in 1967, and also a successful poet writing the books, "My Heart Soars" (1974), and My Spirit Soars" (1982). George also recited his famous work, "Lament For Confederation" at the Canadian Centennial Celebrations in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1967, and he also became an influential speaker on the rights of the native peoples of North America. On September 23, 1981, Chief Dan George died in Vancouver, British Columbia, at the age of 82, and was buried at his native birthplace. George was succeeded as Chief by his son.

Bio by: Peterborough K



Inscription

His Heart Soared Like The Eagle
In Loving Memory of
Our Dad


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  • Maintained by: Find A Grave
  • Originally Created by: Vivian Pattee
  • Added: 3 Jan 2005
  • Find A Grave Memorial 10211109
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Chief Dan George (24 Jul 1899–23 Sep 1981), Find A Grave Memorial no. 10211109, citing Burrard Cemetery, North Vancouver, Greater Vancouver Regional District, British Columbia, Canada ; Maintained by Find A Grave .