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John Person Clark

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John Person Clark

Birth
New York, USA
Death
3 Sep 1888 (aged 80)
Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan, USA GPS-Latitude: 42.3493996, Longitude: -83.0220545
Plot
Sec A Lot 167
Memorial ID
View Source
Prominent shipbuilder and owner of lake passenger steamers during the 1820s

His father, John Clark, was born at Norwich, Connecticut, on November 14, 1777. On February 2, 1802, he married his first wife Sally (Person) Clark, who was born at Brunswick, New York, June 1, 1780, and died at Buffalo, New York, April 18, 1813. The children of John Clark and Sally Person included:

George Clark, born March 9, 1804
James Woodruff Clark, born May 4, 1806
John Person Clark, born April 10, 1808
Nelson Clark, born January 7, 1810
Catherine Clark, born September 8, 1812

John P. Clark had additional half siblings when his father remarried after the death of his mother.

John Person was the widowed son of John Clark, per death certificate

****
John Person Clark - The late John O. Clark was for many years, one of Detroit's most conspicuous and most successful citizens. He was a pioneer in the fishing business in both the Maumee and Detroit rivers, as well as a pioneer ship-builder, with a yard at Spring Wells. His whole life was filled with active endeavor and he was pre-eminently successful in every line he entered. He died possessed of an estate exceeded by few others of his time in this section.

John P. Clark was born near Catskill on the Hudson river, New York, April 10, 1808, the son of John [Clark] and Sally (Person) Clark. The father lost an eye while serving as a soldier in the War of 1812. On April 18, 1813, the mother (Sally Person) died at Black Rock, New York and in November, 1813, he married Sally Swayne, and two children were born to that marriage at Black Rock, New York. In 1818 the father determined to move west, take up government land and establish a home for his boys, and in that same year the family came to Michigan by boat from Buffalo and landed on the south end of Hickory Island. So impressed was the boy, John P. Clark, with the beauty of Sugar Islands and Hickory, where they camped out, that he then and there decided to some day own those beautiful islands. It is characteristic of the man that with his first surplus money he did purchase the islands, which he continued to own and they were a part of his estate. John Clark, the father, established the family on the farm in Brownstown, Wayne county, and there spent the remainder of his life, dying February 22, 1827, aged fifty years.

The first employment of John P. Clark secured away from home was at Toledo, Ohio, where he worked for a firm for fifty cents a week and board. In 1826 he began his fishing business, with fishing grounds in the Maumee river, subsequently removing his operations to the Detroit river. He was successful from the very start, and as his trade increased he employed both a day and a night crew, and even then was barely able to supply the demand for the fish; for, although Detroit at that time was merely a trading post, he found a market for tons of his daily catch, and it was here he laid the foundation of his ample fortune. For ten years after inaugurating his fishing enterprise he fished the Maumee river in conjunction with the Detroit river, and he shipped large quantities of Maumee catfish to New Orleans until the Civil war came on. While on the Maumee river he supplied cargoes of wood to the canal boats as a side issue. In 1833 he bought a steam barge and began the towing business. Three years later he went on an exploring tour around the coast of Lake Michigan, with Indians for pilots, who pointed out to him their choicest fishing grounds, and with fifty men he located at White Fish Bay, Wisconsin.

In 1837 Mr. Clark came to Detroit to make his home. To his manifold enterprises he added that of ship-building, in that year building a dry-dock at Spring Wells (now in the city limits), where he built and owned many boats, notably the steamers "Alaska," "Jay Cooke," "Pearl," 'Gazelle" and "Riverside," all well remembered by many citizens of today. In this line of business, as in all others in which he engaged, he met with success, and prosperity continued to smile upon him. Among his properties were Sugar, Hickory and Celeron Islands in the Detroit river, an island in the Maumee river, Ohio, also Horson Island at the mouth of Huron river, and he owned the upper end of Crosse Isle, all of which he held for years, finally disposing of them at ,a handsome profit. His holdings of Detroit real estate were large including the house at the corner of Fort and Cass streets, where he first resided on coming to the city, and his old homestead on the river road. Tie also at one time was largely interested in Michigan and Wisconsin timber lands.

Mr. Clark was a man of marked individuality and was known widely in his time. In the operation of his business he combined rare foresight and sagacity with the strictest integrity. His rugged honesty was universally known and his credit was unlimited. He possessed none of the speculator's spirit, yet was not too conservative to branch out into new lines, and when once interested in a new business to push it to the utmost. But he never made an investment until he was absolutely certain as to its ultimate outcome. At an age when most men retire from active life he continued in the harness, and was as active almost as in his prime, never content to give over the direction of his large interests to others. He died on September 3, 1888, after a long, successful and useful life of four-score years. He had endured the hardships of pioneer life and lived to see the little trading post grow to a mighty city, in which he and his enjoyed the comforts and luxuries of modern civilization, procured by his own toil and talent.

Mr. Clark married Susan E. Booth on February 20, 1838. She was born in England, the daughter of a Yorkshire yeoman, and she died May 18, 1860. The children of this marriage were: Mrs. J. A. Hecking, who for a long period resided in Paris, France, and is now deceased, dying in that city; Mrs. George Atcheson, of Detroit; Alvin S., deceased: Mrs. W. O. Ashley, residing in California; Arthur J., also deceased; Walter B. and Norman S.. both deceased.
On Feb. 9, 1863, Mr. Clark married Eliza W. Whiting, who died January 14, 1883.

Mrs. Atcheson. who was Alice E. Clark, married in Detroit, September 25, 1866, Captain George Atcheson, who was a native of New York state, born in 1841. While Captain Atcheson never attended school, after he was ten years old, he. by his own efforts, attained more then ordinary learning and culture, and among other accomplishments became fluent in both the Greek and Latin languages, being self taught in both. He was an inveterate student, both of the Bible and Shakespeare, and knew them thoroughly. At the age of eighteen he enlisted in the Fourth United States Regiment of Infantry and served through the Civil war. first as private, then corporal and sergeant, and was later brevetted captain. After the war he continued in the army until 1872. when he resigned from the service and made his home in Kansas. In 1889 he came to Miehisran and died in Detroit in 1893. To the marriage of Captain and Mrs. Alice Clark Atcheson were born three sons, as follows: Walter C. now of Kalamazoo, Michigan, married Alice Williams, and they have two children, Arthur W. and Eliza M.; George W., who died April 13, 1908; and Norman S. [Clark], a well known architect of Detroit, who married Daisy Kellman. and they have one son, Douglas.

History of Detroit, by Paul Leake, Vol. 3, 1912, pp 983-985

Prominent shipbuilder and owner of lake passenger steamers during the 1820s

His father, John Clark, was born at Norwich, Connecticut, on November 14, 1777. On February 2, 1802, he married his first wife Sally (Person) Clark, who was born at Brunswick, New York, June 1, 1780, and died at Buffalo, New York, April 18, 1813. The children of John Clark and Sally Person included:

George Clark, born March 9, 1804
James Woodruff Clark, born May 4, 1806
John Person Clark, born April 10, 1808
Nelson Clark, born January 7, 1810
Catherine Clark, born September 8, 1812

John P. Clark had additional half siblings when his father remarried after the death of his mother.

John Person was the widowed son of John Clark, per death certificate

****
John Person Clark - The late John O. Clark was for many years, one of Detroit's most conspicuous and most successful citizens. He was a pioneer in the fishing business in both the Maumee and Detroit rivers, as well as a pioneer ship-builder, with a yard at Spring Wells. His whole life was filled with active endeavor and he was pre-eminently successful in every line he entered. He died possessed of an estate exceeded by few others of his time in this section.

John P. Clark was born near Catskill on the Hudson river, New York, April 10, 1808, the son of John [Clark] and Sally (Person) Clark. The father lost an eye while serving as a soldier in the War of 1812. On April 18, 1813, the mother (Sally Person) died at Black Rock, New York and in November, 1813, he married Sally Swayne, and two children were born to that marriage at Black Rock, New York. In 1818 the father determined to move west, take up government land and establish a home for his boys, and in that same year the family came to Michigan by boat from Buffalo and landed on the south end of Hickory Island. So impressed was the boy, John P. Clark, with the beauty of Sugar Islands and Hickory, where they camped out, that he then and there decided to some day own those beautiful islands. It is characteristic of the man that with his first surplus money he did purchase the islands, which he continued to own and they were a part of his estate. John Clark, the father, established the family on the farm in Brownstown, Wayne county, and there spent the remainder of his life, dying February 22, 1827, aged fifty years.

The first employment of John P. Clark secured away from home was at Toledo, Ohio, where he worked for a firm for fifty cents a week and board. In 1826 he began his fishing business, with fishing grounds in the Maumee river, subsequently removing his operations to the Detroit river. He was successful from the very start, and as his trade increased he employed both a day and a night crew, and even then was barely able to supply the demand for the fish; for, although Detroit at that time was merely a trading post, he found a market for tons of his daily catch, and it was here he laid the foundation of his ample fortune. For ten years after inaugurating his fishing enterprise he fished the Maumee river in conjunction with the Detroit river, and he shipped large quantities of Maumee catfish to New Orleans until the Civil war came on. While on the Maumee river he supplied cargoes of wood to the canal boats as a side issue. In 1833 he bought a steam barge and began the towing business. Three years later he went on an exploring tour around the coast of Lake Michigan, with Indians for pilots, who pointed out to him their choicest fishing grounds, and with fifty men he located at White Fish Bay, Wisconsin.

In 1837 Mr. Clark came to Detroit to make his home. To his manifold enterprises he added that of ship-building, in that year building a dry-dock at Spring Wells (now in the city limits), where he built and owned many boats, notably the steamers "Alaska," "Jay Cooke," "Pearl," 'Gazelle" and "Riverside," all well remembered by many citizens of today. In this line of business, as in all others in which he engaged, he met with success, and prosperity continued to smile upon him. Among his properties were Sugar, Hickory and Celeron Islands in the Detroit river, an island in the Maumee river, Ohio, also Horson Island at the mouth of Huron river, and he owned the upper end of Crosse Isle, all of which he held for years, finally disposing of them at ,a handsome profit. His holdings of Detroit real estate were large including the house at the corner of Fort and Cass streets, where he first resided on coming to the city, and his old homestead on the river road. Tie also at one time was largely interested in Michigan and Wisconsin timber lands.

Mr. Clark was a man of marked individuality and was known widely in his time. In the operation of his business he combined rare foresight and sagacity with the strictest integrity. His rugged honesty was universally known and his credit was unlimited. He possessed none of the speculator's spirit, yet was not too conservative to branch out into new lines, and when once interested in a new business to push it to the utmost. But he never made an investment until he was absolutely certain as to its ultimate outcome. At an age when most men retire from active life he continued in the harness, and was as active almost as in his prime, never content to give over the direction of his large interests to others. He died on September 3, 1888, after a long, successful and useful life of four-score years. He had endured the hardships of pioneer life and lived to see the little trading post grow to a mighty city, in which he and his enjoyed the comforts and luxuries of modern civilization, procured by his own toil and talent.

Mr. Clark married Susan E. Booth on February 20, 1838. She was born in England, the daughter of a Yorkshire yeoman, and she died May 18, 1860. The children of this marriage were: Mrs. J. A. Hecking, who for a long period resided in Paris, France, and is now deceased, dying in that city; Mrs. George Atcheson, of Detroit; Alvin S., deceased: Mrs. W. O. Ashley, residing in California; Arthur J., also deceased; Walter B. and Norman S.. both deceased.
On Feb. 9, 1863, Mr. Clark married Eliza W. Whiting, who died January 14, 1883.

Mrs. Atcheson. who was Alice E. Clark, married in Detroit, September 25, 1866, Captain George Atcheson, who was a native of New York state, born in 1841. While Captain Atcheson never attended school, after he was ten years old, he. by his own efforts, attained more then ordinary learning and culture, and among other accomplishments became fluent in both the Greek and Latin languages, being self taught in both. He was an inveterate student, both of the Bible and Shakespeare, and knew them thoroughly. At the age of eighteen he enlisted in the Fourth United States Regiment of Infantry and served through the Civil war. first as private, then corporal and sergeant, and was later brevetted captain. After the war he continued in the army until 1872. when he resigned from the service and made his home in Kansas. In 1889 he came to Miehisran and died in Detroit in 1893. To the marriage of Captain and Mrs. Alice Clark Atcheson were born three sons, as follows: Walter C. now of Kalamazoo, Michigan, married Alice Williams, and they have two children, Arthur W. and Eliza M.; George W., who died April 13, 1908; and Norman S. [Clark], a well known architect of Detroit, who married Daisy Kellman. and they have one son, Douglas.

History of Detroit, by Paul Leake, Vol. 3, 1912, pp 983-985


Inscription


JOHN P. CLARK
Born April 10, 1808
Died Sept. 3, 1888



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