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 George Perham Spaulding

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George Perham Spaulding

Birth
Cavendish, Windsor County, Vermont, USA
Death
28 Nov 1913 (aged 70)
Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
Burial
Longview, Gregg County, Texas, USA
Plot
Ave E plot 6
Memorial ID
10166641 View Source

Residence Cavendish VT;
Enlisted on 5/2/1861 as a private.
On 5/9/1861 he was mustered into Co. E, 1st Vermont Infantry
Mustered Out on 8/15/1861
Re-enlisted on 8/20/1861 as a sergeant.
On 9/21/1861 he was mustered into Co. C, 4th Vermont Infantry
Re-enlisted on 12/15/1863
Promoted to 1st Sergeant of Co. C (date?)
Transferred 2/25/1864 to Co. E
Promoted to 2nd Lieut 5/5/1864 and transferred to Co. K
POW 6/23/1864 Weldon Railroad, VA
Paroled 11/28/1864 (place not stated)
Promoted to 1st Lieut 6/4/1865 and transferred to Co. B
Mustered Out on 7/13/1865

Son of John Jr. & Lucy (Marsh) Spaulding. He lived at home until 15 years of age, when he went to live with General and Mrs. Davis in Cavendish. He remained there until the Civil War broke out. When he was 18 years old he enlisted at Cavendish, in Feb., 1861. He served three months, taking part in the Battle of Bethel on the James River.
Enlisting a second time, 20 Aug 1861, in Co. C, 4th Vermont Infantry, George served three years and at the end of this he re-enlisted to serve until the close of the war.
He distinguished himself in the Civil War by his bravery and was made Corporal soon after enlisting, then promoted to First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, and at the close of the war, he was promoted to 1st Lieutenant and Acting Captain of Co. B, not having received his commission.

He returned from the army aching to the bone with scurvy, which he had contracted while in prison. The food in prison, Mr. Spaulding said, was terrible. Many a day only beans were given to the soldiers to eat. Half the time there were not fires to cook with and the water was white with life [lice]. He told of a wonderful happening while in prison. The prisoners craving for some fresh water to drink, and had been for days praying for some to be given to them when suddenly there sprang up a pool of clear, fresh, cold water out of the ground in a very dry spot. It was a great relief to the poor suffering prisoners and they felt it was some miracle performed by God. The prisoners were divided into groups of 81 each. Mr. Spaulding had charge of one of these groups. These men were taken out to get wood in groups of six or eight and the one in charge of the group was responsible for the lives of each man. Immediate death by shooting was the penalty paid if one of the men escaped. One incident occurred when one of his men was missing, having hidden behind a stump, one of the head officials of the prison noticed the absence and was about to punish Mr. Spaulding with his life, when suddenly the missing man arrived upon the scene. During his time in prison he has said that he craved for salt to eat so badly that he told the prison guard if he would get some he would give him his only coat. The guard brought him a small bag, at which Mr. Spaulding gave up his only coat. This occurred during the winter months, and Mr. Spaulding has said he was very choice of the salt and would take only a little pinch at a time. When Mr. Spaulding came out of prison, he said that the only clothing he had was just the pair of trousers he had on and those were so rotten that the threads had rotted away to the seams so he had made little sticks and fastened the seams together. The other clothes had rotted to pieces from having to sleep on the damp ground. In February, 1864, before the close of the war, Mr. Spaulding wedded Miss Margaret Sullivan of Cavendish, after a typical soldier's romance. During the few years of their living in Vermont, three sons were born to them. At the close of the war, while Mr. Spaulding remained in Rutland, he was a locomotive engineer, running from Rutland, Vt. to Schenectady, NY When leaving Vermont, he and family went West and from there to Texas, where he had been living for more than 33 years prior to his coming to Worcester. Mrs. Spaulding died 10 June, 1912. She was an active and faithful worker in St. Anthony's Catholic Church and was looked to as one of the finest women in Longview, Texas, where both lived. Mr. Spaulding also became a Roman Catholic during the Civil War.
He died at the age of 70 years, 7 months and 2 days. At the time of his death he had not a single gray hair in his head. He had dark brown hair.
Residing in Proctorsville, Vermont, on RSVO 1885 roster.

Died of cancer of the larynx. Granted an invalid pension from Missouri in 1883.

Sources:
VermontCivilWar.Org Database
http://www.civilwardata.com/
active/hdsquery.dll?SoldierHistory?U&354811
http://www.weldonrailroad.com/updates.html

Residence Cavendish VT;
Enlisted on 5/2/1861 as a private.
On 5/9/1861 he was mustered into Co. E, 1st Vermont Infantry
Mustered Out on 8/15/1861
Re-enlisted on 8/20/1861 as a sergeant.
On 9/21/1861 he was mustered into Co. C, 4th Vermont Infantry
Re-enlisted on 12/15/1863
Promoted to 1st Sergeant of Co. C (date?)
Transferred 2/25/1864 to Co. E
Promoted to 2nd Lieut 5/5/1864 and transferred to Co. K
POW 6/23/1864 Weldon Railroad, VA
Paroled 11/28/1864 (place not stated)
Promoted to 1st Lieut 6/4/1865 and transferred to Co. B
Mustered Out on 7/13/1865

Son of John Jr. & Lucy (Marsh) Spaulding. He lived at home until 15 years of age, when he went to live with General and Mrs. Davis in Cavendish. He remained there until the Civil War broke out. When he was 18 years old he enlisted at Cavendish, in Feb., 1861. He served three months, taking part in the Battle of Bethel on the James River.
Enlisting a second time, 20 Aug 1861, in Co. C, 4th Vermont Infantry, George served three years and at the end of this he re-enlisted to serve until the close of the war.
He distinguished himself in the Civil War by his bravery and was made Corporal soon after enlisting, then promoted to First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, and at the close of the war, he was promoted to 1st Lieutenant and Acting Captain of Co. B, not having received his commission.

He returned from the army aching to the bone with scurvy, which he had contracted while in prison. The food in prison, Mr. Spaulding said, was terrible. Many a day only beans were given to the soldiers to eat. Half the time there were not fires to cook with and the water was white with life [lice]. He told of a wonderful happening while in prison. The prisoners craving for some fresh water to drink, and had been for days praying for some to be given to them when suddenly there sprang up a pool of clear, fresh, cold water out of the ground in a very dry spot. It was a great relief to the poor suffering prisoners and they felt it was some miracle performed by God. The prisoners were divided into groups of 81 each. Mr. Spaulding had charge of one of these groups. These men were taken out to get wood in groups of six or eight and the one in charge of the group was responsible for the lives of each man. Immediate death by shooting was the penalty paid if one of the men escaped. One incident occurred when one of his men was missing, having hidden behind a stump, one of the head officials of the prison noticed the absence and was about to punish Mr. Spaulding with his life, when suddenly the missing man arrived upon the scene. During his time in prison he has said that he craved for salt to eat so badly that he told the prison guard if he would get some he would give him his only coat. The guard brought him a small bag, at which Mr. Spaulding gave up his only coat. This occurred during the winter months, and Mr. Spaulding has said he was very choice of the salt and would take only a little pinch at a time. When Mr. Spaulding came out of prison, he said that the only clothing he had was just the pair of trousers he had on and those were so rotten that the threads had rotted away to the seams so he had made little sticks and fastened the seams together. The other clothes had rotted to pieces from having to sleep on the damp ground. In February, 1864, before the close of the war, Mr. Spaulding wedded Miss Margaret Sullivan of Cavendish, after a typical soldier's romance. During the few years of their living in Vermont, three sons were born to them. At the close of the war, while Mr. Spaulding remained in Rutland, he was a locomotive engineer, running from Rutland, Vt. to Schenectady, NY When leaving Vermont, he and family went West and from there to Texas, where he had been living for more than 33 years prior to his coming to Worcester. Mrs. Spaulding died 10 June, 1912. She was an active and faithful worker in St. Anthony's Catholic Church and was looked to as one of the finest women in Longview, Texas, where both lived. Mr. Spaulding also became a Roman Catholic during the Civil War.
He died at the age of 70 years, 7 months and 2 days. At the time of his death he had not a single gray hair in his head. He had dark brown hair.
Residing in Proctorsville, Vermont, on RSVO 1885 roster.

Died of cancer of the larynx. Granted an invalid pension from Missouri in 1883.

Sources:
VermontCivilWar.Org Database
http://www.civilwardata.com/
active/hdsquery.dll?SoldierHistory?U&354811
http://www.weldonrailroad.com/updates.html


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