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Dr Charles Dudley Boyd

Birth
Due West, Abbeville County, South Carolina, USA
Death
23 Dec 1992 (aged 72)
Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA
Burial
Webster, Harris County, Texas, USA
Memorial ID
10030619 View Source

Charles was the son of Reverend Carroll Mac Boyd and Julia Wardlaw Boyd. His siblings were brothers Mac and Bob, and sister, Louise Boyd Frances. While in college, he married Jane Zaidee Lewis, daughter of Dr. William Bryant Lewis and Zaidee Lewis, medical missionaries in the Belgian Congo, Africa. Charles and Jane had three sons, Charles Bryant Boyd, Gary Lewis Boyd, and Robert Dudley Boyd.

Dr. Charles Boyd, who was affectionately known to his patients and friends as "Doc", was the founder of The Presbyterian Service Center located on Westover Street in Houston, Texas. Doc, a wheelchair bound polio survivor, realized that there was a need for barrier free housing in Houston and dreamed of building such housing, as well as medical and dining facilities. His dream began to come to fruition when the first duplex, the medical office, and his and Jane's home were built on a five acre tract of land fronted by a grove of oak trees. Between 1972 and 1982, the remaining four duplexes were constructed, and the Service Center provided low-cost, barrier free housing to elderly and handicapped people. Doc provided medical attention for the residents. For many years, Doc went fishing on Wednesdays with his fishing buddies. However, in time, as his buddies became ill and died, his own physical restrictions ended his fishing days on Galveston Bay, and then you could find him out on the five acres of the Service Center, mowing and using the weed trimmer, working alongside his loyal friends, Bob Barber and George Byrd, as well as other volunteers, maintaining the Service Center property.

Doc had always accomplished amazing feats in spite of being confined to a wheelchair, and he was famous for his story-telling and jokes. He had a wonderful sense of humor and a great smile. However, surviving polio was not the only battle he would wage during his lifetime. In 1981, he was diagnosed with melonoma, and underwent a 15 hour surgery to remove the malignant tissue. Following that ordeal, he underwent numerous other surgeries for reconstruction and skin grafts. In 1982, he was pronounced free of cancer, but a routine examination a few years later revealed a return of the illness. He fought valiantly, but finally lost the battle. He went home on December 23, 1992.

Doc met a lot of people during his lifetime, and most of them have never forgotten him. He was a Marcus Welby who made house calls when a patient was worse off than he was. His phone number was always published and he was always available to friends, family, and patients, if and when they needed him. He was a good man.

Charles was the son of Reverend Carroll Mac Boyd and Julia Wardlaw Boyd. His siblings were brothers Mac and Bob, and sister, Louise Boyd Frances. While in college, he married Jane Zaidee Lewis, daughter of Dr. William Bryant Lewis and Zaidee Lewis, medical missionaries in the Belgian Congo, Africa. Charles and Jane had three sons, Charles Bryant Boyd, Gary Lewis Boyd, and Robert Dudley Boyd.

Dr. Charles Boyd, who was affectionately known to his patients and friends as "Doc", was the founder of The Presbyterian Service Center located on Westover Street in Houston, Texas. Doc, a wheelchair bound polio survivor, realized that there was a need for barrier free housing in Houston and dreamed of building such housing, as well as medical and dining facilities. His dream began to come to fruition when the first duplex, the medical office, and his and Jane's home were built on a five acre tract of land fronted by a grove of oak trees. Between 1972 and 1982, the remaining four duplexes were constructed, and the Service Center provided low-cost, barrier free housing to elderly and handicapped people. Doc provided medical attention for the residents. For many years, Doc went fishing on Wednesdays with his fishing buddies. However, in time, as his buddies became ill and died, his own physical restrictions ended his fishing days on Galveston Bay, and then you could find him out on the five acres of the Service Center, mowing and using the weed trimmer, working alongside his loyal friends, Bob Barber and George Byrd, as well as other volunteers, maintaining the Service Center property.

Doc had always accomplished amazing feats in spite of being confined to a wheelchair, and he was famous for his story-telling and jokes. He had a wonderful sense of humor and a great smile. However, surviving polio was not the only battle he would wage during his lifetime. In 1981, he was diagnosed with melonoma, and underwent a 15 hour surgery to remove the malignant tissue. Following that ordeal, he underwent numerous other surgeries for reconstruction and skin grafts. In 1982, he was pronounced free of cancer, but a routine examination a few years later revealed a return of the illness. He fought valiantly, but finally lost the battle. He went home on December 23, 1992.

Doc met a lot of people during his lifetime, and most of them have never forgotten him. He was a Marcus Welby who made house calls when a patient was worse off than he was. His phone number was always published and he was always available to friends, family, and patients, if and when they needed him. He was a good man.

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