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 John Apriesnig

John Apriesnig

Birth
Austria
Death Aug 1922 (aged 39)
Iron Mountain, Dickinson County, Michigan, USA
Burial Iron Mountain, Dickinson County, Michigan, USA
Plot MINNEWAWA, LOT 31, GR. 2
Memorial ID 100027687 · View Source
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The Iron Mountain News, Iron Mountain, Dickinson County, Michigan, [Saturday, August 5, 1922], page 1, columns 1-2

CHAPIN MINE MISHAPS TAKE LIVES OF TWO
Fatalities Occur Within 24 Hours of Each Other

EXCHANGED JOBS
One Man Falls Down Chute, Other Caught By Cave-In
Two fatalities within 24 hours, the first in four or five years, marred the safety record of the Chapin mine yesterday and today. The first occurred about 3:30 yesterday afternoon when John Apriesnig, aged about 40, fell down a timber chute near the old Millie workings. Frank Kozel, about 32 years old, was the second victim, when he was caught in a cave of ore on a stope about 100 feet above the twelfth level of B shaft at about 8:30 this morning. Apriesnig was alive when taken to surface, but died at the hospital early last evening. Kozel was buried alive, dying of suffocation before the rescuers could reach him. More than an hour was required to remove the ore which covered his body. Both men were married, Kozel living on a farm west of the city park, and Apriesnig in a home at 316 Vulcan street. By an odd coincidence, the two men had exchanged jobs about a month before.
Apriesnig had climbed the ladder road alongside the timber chute to warn the miners above not to dump any more ore down the chute until a jam in the lower end had been cleared away. After giving his warning, he started down again and a minute later his body shot out the base of the chute on the level below.
The distance he fell is estimated at from 100 to 150 feet. Whether he slipped or was struck by a chunk of ore will never be known. He was rushed to St. George's hospital, but his injuries were so severe that death was seen to be inevitable. He was terribly bruised and mangled, and had also suffered internal injuries.
Working in Stope.
Kozel and his partner, Atilio Mochen, were working in a stope about 100 feet above the twelfth level. Kozel was drilling preparatory to blasting. How the cavein occurred is uncertain, but it completely buried Kozel, and narrowly missed his partner, who escaped by crawling through a small hole to the ladder way. Mochen gave the alarm, the cage was called, and the ambulance summoned, but it was found that considerable time would be required to move the ore that covered the body of the unfortunate man. All the men who could get into the stope set to work with shovels, and the body was reached shortly after 10 o'clock, and brought to surface a few minutes later. It was taken to Payant's undertaking establishment.
News of the tragedy this morning spread quickly, and a crowd of probably 200 men, women and children gathered about the mouth of the shaft, silently waiting to learn the identity of the victim. Crowds of others in front yards and on sidewalks, [sic] watched the slow progress of the ambulance through the streets.
Scene Has Changed.
"I sometimes wish that I were an artist and could sketch the scenes about the mouth of a shaft after an accident," Dr. J.A. Crowell, for forty years physician for the Oliver Iron Mining Co., declared this morning while waiting for the body of Frank Kozel to be brought up B shaft, [sic] "It is one of the most pathetic scenes I know of."
"This isn't like it used to be. In the old days, when there was an accident, the whole shift would quit work, and would come to surface in their digging clothes. Then they would stand around the mouth of the shaft and wait.
"It would not be long before the location heard of the news, and the women and children would come to join the men. I have seen hundreds of people grouped about this same shaft – waiting, like they are this morning.
"Then, all of a sudden, we would hear the slow, mournful clang of the six bells – the hoisting signal giving notice that we would know the worst in a few moments. The look of strained anxiety, of dreading anticipation, on those faces can never be forgotten once one has seen it.
"Of course, we don't have as many accidents as we used to; the safety movement has that to its credit. It's too bad that these should occur just when we're beginning to feel that we have a really safe mine."
Services Tomorrow.
Funeral services for Apriesnig will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the home to St. Mary's church. Rev. Mockler officiating. He is survived by his widow and three children, John, 18; Frank, 12, and Priscilla, 9. Apriesnig was an Austrian, born in German-Austria, December 12, 1882 and came to this country in 1913. After working in Milwaukee for about five years, he came to Iron Mountain and entered the employ of the Oliver Mining company. A year ago last May he brought his wife and children over from Austria and for the last few weeks had been building a new home on Stanton street. He was a member of the Sick Benefit association, Sons of Carinthia, which will take part in the services.
Kozel had been a resident of Iron Mountain for about two years and is survived by his widow and one son, 5 years of age. The body will be shipped Monday morning to his home in Bessemer and the funeral will be held there Tuesday morning. Kozel was born in Poland and was a member of the Polish lodge in Bessemer.


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APRIESNIG
FATHER
1882-1922


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  • Created by: klh
  • Added: 2 Nov 2012
  • Find A Grave Memorial 100027687
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for John Apriesnig (22 Dec 1882–Aug 1922), Find A Grave Memorial no. 100027687, citing Iron Mountain Cemetery Park, Iron Mountain, Dickinson County, Michigan, USA ; Maintained by klh (contributor 47722765) .