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 Louis Simkins Stackhouse

Louis Simkins Stackhouse

Birth
Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio, USA
Death 1 Oct 1914 (aged 63)
Carroll County, Ohio, USA
Burial Carrollton, Carroll County, Ohio, USA
Memorial ID 100011445 · View Source
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the Carroll Free Press, Carrollton, Ohio, Wednesday, August 10, 1887.

SAD ACCIDENT, In Which Abner Beadle was Instantly Killed and Louis Stackhouse was Seriously Injured.

Monday morning about 9 o'clock, while there was yet but little stir in the business part of town, the sad and shocking news was spread abroad that the gravel bank on the old still house road near north Lisbon Street had caved in, burying Abner Beadle and Louis Stackhouse under tons of stone and gravel. In a very short time hundreds of people hurried to the scene in conveyances, and on foot, only to be shocked beyond their expectations by the ghastly sight before them.
Abner Beadle and Louis Stackhouse had been digging gravel to grade around John W. Helfrich's new house, and at the point of the road where the accident occurred the gravel bed extends out into the road proper, making it desirable to have the bank removed in order to widen the passage for teams. Monday morning these parties had gone out to continue their work of tunneling under the hill, but shortly after the first load had been delivered, the overhanging bank, of several wagon loads, fell down upon the unfortunate victims, covering them completely from sight. Mr. Beadle when he was exhumed was bent forward with his neck broken and several ugly looking wounds about his head and neck. His head was evidently forced forward by the weight of stone and clay from above, striking his forehead on a sharp rock in front, which crushed in that part of the skull above his eyes, leaving a triangular shaped gash about three inches from point to point, and similar contusion upon the back of his head near the base of the brain, the stroke which doubtless broke his neck.
William Birch, a boy of about 13 years, was nor far off and was the first to give the alarm, and when assistance came Mr. Stackhouse's feet were seen protruding from beneath the heap of gravel. He was taken out first and placed upon a stretcher under the shade of a stable across the road. By this time Drs. Williams and Skeeles and Coroner Butler were upon the ground rendering such temporary assistance as they could until the body of Mr. Beadle was uncovered and removed from under the heavy weight upon it. Mr. Stackhouse was badly bruised and scarred in several places and his left arm was broken in two places, but after he was taken home and his real injuries ascertained by a consultation among the doctors it is thought that his injuries, though very severe and painful, will not prove fatal. But not so with his unfortunate partner, Mr. Beadle, who was killed upon the spot, and so sudden that he evidently experienced no pain.
While the doctors were preparing the wounded man to be taken home, some persons were sent to bring stretchers upon which to carry both unfortunates, and to inform their families of the sad event. It was indeed a melancholy sight to see both stretchers being carried down Lisbon Street, with the sidewalks lined with people anxious to learn the particulars of the accident, and as to which one of the stretchers contained the wounded man and which one the dead man. When the procession reached the Presbyterian Church, Mr. Stackhouse was taken up North Street to his home on Park Hill, and the body of Mr. Beadle carried across the public square to his home east of the new jail on Canal Street, where a large crowd had already gathered, the female portion consoling the newly made widow in this her sad affliction. In this instance trouble has not come singly to Mrs. Beadle, for she still mourns the loss of her oldest son, who passed away within the present year; and now the sudden and untimely death of her husband, leaving her almost homeless and with three fatherless children to support, is a shock that it is feared will require more than the oil of kindness and the hand of sympathy to assuage.
In this world of sickness, sorrow, pain and death, family circles are frequently broken up, and now and then a whole neighborhood is disturbed and puts on mourning over some sad calamity that has befallen it; and in this instance Carrollton responded readily in tendering their services and sympathies to the afflicted and bereaved families of Monday's fatal accident. And in response to the people's liberality, these afflicted ones should receive these manifestations of sympathy in the same spirit with which they are tendered.
Abner Beadle was a soldier in Company A., 80th Regiment, O.V.I., and was about 45 years of age. He was a member of our G.A.R. Post, and was buried by that organization yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock, after the funeral services were held at the Reform Church where a very impressive sermon was preached over the remains by his comrade, Rev. John I. Wilson of the M. E. Church. Prayer by Rev. J. H. Hawk, and congregational singing of the hymn: "Rock of Ages, cleft for me"

Information researched by Richard Paul Culler of Carrollton, Ohio.



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  • Created by: Names in Stone
  • Added: 1 Nov 2012
  • Find A Grave Memorial 100011445
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Louis Simkins Stackhouse (30 Oct 1850–1 Oct 1914), Find A Grave Memorial no. 100011445, citing Grandview Cemetery, Carrollton, Carroll County, Ohio, USA ; Maintained by Names in Stone (contributor 47318282) .