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LoRetta Hughes (#46865226)
 member for 10 years, 7 months, 11 days
[Add to MyFriends]
Bio and Links
Bio Photo I have been climbing around
on my Family Tree, swinging
on it's branches, and digging
at it's roots for over
30 years, (since 1975).
I have been widowed since 1991, retired in 2005.
I LOVE Find-A-Grave. It is a wonderful
asset to the genealogy world.
If I've created a record that someone
needs to correct, update or add
information, please let me know and
I'll be glad to add your information
for you;... or if the person is your
direct family member, and you would
like to have me transfer "ownership"
of that memorial page to you, please
let me know...If that person is not
related to me and they are directly
related to you; I will be glad to
transfer their memorial to you.
However, I want to note:
Nearly all of the memorials that I
have created are connected to my
family tree and are a result of a
lot of years hard work and research.

To all the members who have been
kind enough to transfer "ownership"
of my family members to me....
I THANK YOU!
Find A Grave is one of my favorite
sites.
It has given me a place that I can
remember my loved ones and honor
their memory.

If you have time, please leave a flower
for my dear husband, Roy E. Hughes.


January 2014
I just lost my Daddy & Momma
within 3 weeks. Please be patient,
I am way behind in answering request.

January 2015
PLEASE do not post death certificates
on my memorials.....Please,,,they are
tacky.

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or
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Messages left for LoRetta Hughes (1062)[Leave Message]
Tom
Frank Marion Mangleburg
Hey LoRetta,

Thanks so much for your hard work of compiling this info.

Frank Marion Mangleburg is my grandfather and he is not buried at Evergreen Cemetery, he is at "Riverside Memorial Park" 7242 Normandy Blvd in Jacksonville FL. His daughter (my mom) is at Evergreen Cemetery.

I am an absolute beginner at "Tree Climbing" and I have been trying to learn about the "Mangleburgs"

I did send this change suggestion to Find a Grave.

Blessings,

Charles Williamson
Added by Tom on Apr 26, 2017 10:33 AM
Marilyn Smith
Miles A Smithhart #16190538
Thank you.
If I get any DNA evidence that changes this I will let you know.
Marilyn
Added by Marilyn Smith on Apr 22, 2017 6:05 PM
Marilyn Smith
Miles A Smithhart #16190538
Miles father was John Smithhart per information extracted from probate records:

Jonathon Cochran left a will in Warren Co. leaving Miles, Mariah and Francis their part of their mother's, Melinda, wife of John Smithhart—from Lucille Calder Martin 2015

Information from Lucille who descends from the daughter Delzie Emiline Smithhart Calder

We still need to validate the relationship between Silas Garoc and Miles. Miles Mariah and Frances were in the household of Silas in 1850 and are often “assumed” to be his children.

Obviously they are the children of John ? Smithhart, who may/may not have murdered his wife and children in 1801-2 in S.C. This John would have to have been born before 1810 in order to have fathered Miles who was born in 1827. There are records for several different John Smithhart/Smithart/Smithheart's in Mississippi around that time.

Some DNA indicates a relationship between the various people but what degree is still in question. But DNA indicates he is probably a nephew not a son of Silas.

Would you consider removing the parental link to Silas?
Added by Marilyn Smith on Apr 21, 2017 3:08 PM
robin pellicci moore
Re: Sara Susan Perritt Rogers
Thank you for the message but I prefer to leave the date as it appears on the stone.
Added by robin pellicci moore on Apr 17, 2017 5:35 PM
Martin Burrell
David Grant, FAG Memorial# 21296580

The 'newest' edition has the spacing more correct and easier for installation. That is why there are two copies. easier and easier for you to install. I spent most of the day on my part of it.

page 663-4.... needs to be included in info at bottom for reference info..

Sorry and thank you for all the help. Martin Burrell
Added by Martin Burrell on Apr 15, 2017 6:17 PM
Martin Burrell
David Grant, FAG Memorial# 21296580
Greetings, [from the Oregon Territorial capital]

This direct copying has been done by others for many years and is an excepted practice. It did take me a long time to transcribe this text as it was printed in a outdated character type and I had to work on each line to correct computer generated printing errors..

This is an open source book being as it was never copyrighted. I am able to post this verbatim as long as I give all the proper source information. Feel free to use my name if you need to.

David Grant, deceased, was one of Oregon's worthy pioneers of 1844. He was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, August 27, 1810, son of Richard and Rachel (McCoy) Grant, both natives of Tennessee. His parents were well-to do farmers and had a family of eight children, six sons and two daughters. They moved from Tennessee to Missouri when David was ten years old. There he grew to manhood, and March 12, 1839, married Miss America Gilliam. She was born in Missouri, December 18, 1823, oldest daughter of General Cornelius Gilliam and his wife, nee Mary Crawford.

In 1844, General Gilliam organized a company, and with his wife and eight children, Mr. Grant and his wife and two children, and others, started May 10, 1844, on the long overland journey for Oregon, reaching their destination December 21, 1844. General Gilliam commanded this company. Upon his arrival here he settled on a donation claim near where the City of Dallas is now located. He subsequently sold this property and took up his abode on the Luckamute, where he resided until the massacre of Whitman. He then commanded a company of the settlers and went to fight the Indians. Marching with his command after supplies and recruits, they arrived at Wells Springs, where he met with an accident that cost him his life. While taking a rope from the wagon, intending to tie his horse with it, a loaded gun with the ramrod in it was accidentally discharged. The rod struck his head he fell and almost instantly expired. He was one of the bravest pioneers that ever landed in Oregon, and his untimely death was a source of great bereavement to his family and to all the early settlers who knew him. He was not only a brave soldier and good citizen, but was also an earnest Christian and a Baptist Minister. His widow survived him thirty years, her death occurring in 1878. She, too, was an earnest Christian, being noted for her generosity and hospitality. She was a member of the Methodist Church. Four of her family are still living, one of which is Hon. W. 8. Gilliam of Walla Walla, Washington, all occupying useful and honorable positions in society.

Upon their arrival in Oregon Mr. and Mrs. Grant took a donation claim of 640 acres, one mile east of where the City of Dallas now stands. Here they built a little log cabin. Their bedstead was made of poles. The rest of their furniture comprised a frying-pan, a skillet, an iron pot, two chairs and their bedding. Here they worked hard from 1845 till 1880, during which time their well directed labor developed this farm into one of the most valuable properties in this vicinity. Mr. Grant died of consumption December 29, 1880. His life was such that he gained the respect and good-will of all with whom he came in contact. Although he took little interest in political matters his views were in harmony with Democratic principles and he always voted that ticket.

He was a devoted member of the Methodist Church South, as also is Mrs. Grant.

The two children they brought with them across the plains were William and Mary Ann. The former has a family and resides in Dallas. The latter died March 21, 1845, at the age of two years. They had two other children, namely: Margaret Jane Grant, born November 12. 1847, is the wife of William Elkins and lives in Dallas; and Martha Ellen Grant , born June 7, 1858, wife of Monroe Burford, died in her thirtieth year, leaving one child.

Mr. Grant had retired from the farm in 1879, purchased property in Dallas and built a residence there. In this home Mrs. Grant still lives. After his death his part of the land was sold for $8,000 and the money divided among the children. Mrs. Grant still retains her portion of the estate. She owns and rents seven dwellings in Dallas.

Personally Mrs. Grunt is a woman of marked iantelligence. Now, at the age of sixty-nine years, she has handsome black eyes, is tall and straight, and well preserved, both mentally and physically. Few have a larger circle of friends and held in higher esteem than she.

For thirty-nine years Mrs. Grant had in her possession a lock of Mrs. Whitman's hair which was taken from her head after she was killed by the Indians. Mrs. Grant received it from one of the volunteer soldiers, who had secured it. After keeping it so long and fearing that it might get lost she presented it to Whitman College, where it is treasured as a memorial of that martyred lady.
********************************
From the book, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, by REV. H. K. Hinds, D. D., CHICAGO, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1893. This is an open source book being as it was never copyrighted. Provided by, Library Division, Provincial Archives of British Columbia, Canada.
Added by Martin Burrell on Apr 15, 2017 4:11 PM
Martin Burrell
David Grant, FAG Memorial# 21296580
Greetings, [from the Oregon Territorial capital]

This direct copying has been done by others for many years and is an excepted practice. It did take me a long time to transcribe this text as it was printed in a outdated character type and I had to work on each line to correct computer generated printing errors..

This is an open source book being as it was never copyrighted. I am able to post this verbatim as long as I give all the proper source information. Feel free to use my name if you need to.

David Grant, deceased, was one of Oregon's worthy pioneers of 1844. He
was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, August 27, 1810, son of Richard and Rachel (McCoy) Grant, both natives of Tennessee. His parents were well-to do farmers and had a family of eight children, six sons and two daughters. They moved from Tennessee to Missouri when David was ten years old. There he grew to manhood, and March 12, 1839, married Miss America Gilliam. She was born in Missouri, December 18, 1823, oldest daughter of General Cornelius Gilliam and his wife, nee Mary
Crawford.

In 1844, General Gilliam organized a company, and with his wife and eight children, Mr. Grant and his wife and two children, and others, started May 10, 1844, on the long overland journey for Oregon, reaching their destination December 21, 1844. General Gilliam commanded this company. Upon his arrival here he settled on a donation claim near where the City of Dallas is now located. He subsequently sold this property and took up his abode on the Luckamute, where he resided until the massacre of Whitman. He then commanded a company of
the settlers and went to fight the Indians. Marching with his command after supplies and recruits, they arrived at Wells Springs, where he met with an accident that cost him his life. While taking a rope from the wagon, intending to tie his horse with it, a loaded gun with the
ramrod in it was accidentally discharged. The rod struck his head he fell and almost instantly expired. He was one of the bravest pioneers
that ever landed in Oregon, and his untimely death was a source of great bereavement to his family and to all the early settlers who knew
him. He was not only a brave soldier and good citizen, but was also an earnest Christian and a Baptist Minister. His widow survived him thirty years, her death occurring in 1878. She, too, was an earnest Christian, being noted for her generosity and hospitality. She was a member of the Methodist Church. Four of her family are still living, one of which is Hon. W. 8. Gilliam of Walla Walla, Washington, all occupying useful and honorable positions in society.

Upon their arrival in Oregon Mr. and Mrs. Grant took a donation claim of 640 acres, one mile east of where the City of Dallas now stands.
Here they built a little log cabin. Their bedstead was made of poles. The rest of their furniture comprised a frying-pan, a skillet, an iron pot, two chairs and their bedding. Here they worked hard from 1845 till 1880, during which time their well directed labor developed this farm into one of the most valuable properties in this vicinity. Mr. Grant died of consumption December 29, 1880. His life was such that he gained the respect and good-will of all with whom he came in contact. Although he took little interest in political matters his views were in harmony with Democratic principles and he always voted that ticket.

He was a devoted member of the Methodist Church South, as also is Mrs. Grant.

The two children they brought with them across the plains were William and Mary Ann. The former has a family and resides in Dallas. The latter died March 21, 1845, at the age of two years. They had two other children, namely: Margaret Jane Grant, born November 12. 1847, is the wife of William Elkins and lives in Dallas; and Martha Ellen Grant , born June 7, 1858, wife of Monroe Burford, died in her thirtieth year, leaving one child.

Mr. Grant had retired from the farm in 1879, purchased property in Dallas and built a residence there. In this home Mrs. Grant still lives. After his deafh his part of the land was sold for $8,000 and the money divided among the children. Mrs. Grant still retains her portion of the estate. She owns and rents seven dwellings in Dallas.

Personally Mrs. Grunt is a woman of marked intelligence. Now, at the age of sixty-nine years, she has handsome black eyes, is tall and straight, and well preserved, both mentally and physically. Few have a larger circle of friends and held in higher esteem than she.

For thirty-nine years Mrs. Grant had in her possession a lock of Mrs. Whitman's hair which was taken from her head after she was killed by the Indians. Mrs. Grant received it from one of the volunteer soldiers, who had secured it. After keeping it so long and fearing that it might get lost she presented it to Whitman College, where it is treasured as a memorial of that martyred lady.
********************************
From the book, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, by REV. H. K. Hinds, D. D., CHICAGO, The Lewis Publishing Company, 1893. This is an open source book being as it was never copyrighted. Provided by, Library Division, Provincial Archives of British Columbia, Canada.
Added by Martin Burrell on Apr 15, 2017 3:19 PM
Martin Burrell
David Grant, FAG Memorial# 21296580
Greetings, [it is easy to copy and paste all of this into their Find A Grave bio...]

Please, consider adding these paragraphs to their bio(s). You may freely change any part you want to. Thanks... Martin Burrell
***********************

David and America Grant were married in Andrew County, Missouri, on 12 March 1839. This was several years before their overland trip to the Oregon Territory, in 1845.

In 1845, Oregon Provisional Census, David Grant's name appears and shows him residing in Twality County, No. 12193. Twality County was soon to be divided up into several counties. The Provisional government was the earliest recognized by the United States.

The State of Oregon today bestows upon them the title, 'Early Oregonian'.

The Grant family secured their Oregon Donation Land Claim, No. 4142, on 01 July 1850, at Oregon City's Federal Land Office. That meant that they had already fulfilled the many requirements of ownership like remaining continually on their claim for a period of time and making the required improvements such as: building a house and barn with fences. Clearing the land for a farm and growing crops. Also, showing proof of both U. S Citizenship and marriage when required. Soon the allotment of land was cut in half to 320 acres..

The physical location of their farm was near Dallas, Polk, Oregon, Sections 33 & 34 of T7S R5W, at 640.77 acres, comprising just over a square mile of fertile farm land located in the Willamette River Valley. This was the maxium land allotment under the U. S. Congress Land Act. It was also the 'first time' that the wife was given ownership of one half the land allotment. Later, these early settlers were able to sell off their land and retire with some wealth. Or, give it away to their heirs.

******************************
Oregon State Archives, Salem
Oregon Historical Records Index
Case #: 0248
Name: Grant, David
Date: 1880
Record Type: Estate
County: Polk
Source: County
******************************
Oregon State Archives, Salem
Oregon Historical Records Index
Case #: 0249
Name: Grant, America
Date: 1896
Record Type: Estate
County: Polk
Source: County
******************************
Added by Martin Burrell on Apr 15, 2017 1:49 PM
Mindi Sandlin
O'Neil family
Hi Loretta,

Are you related to the O'Neil family? If,so do you know exactly where Calvin Wade O'Neil a brother to George Washington O'Neil is buried? Calvin Wade is my 3x great grfth. I read somewhere is is an unmarked grave between goodwater & hatchett creek? If you are not familiar and know someone who is please send my way. I am the "geaneologist" of the family you could say and am trying to piece all I can together. Thanks in advance. You can also email me at msandlin26@gmail.com
Added by Mindi Sandlin on Apr 07, 2017 2:04 PM
Charlotte Ann Price
RE: William Pinkney Price #11719963
Thanks so much,Charlotte Ann Price
Added by Charlotte Ann Price on Apr 04, 2017 8:42 AM
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