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Scott Maxwell (#43707576)
 member for 16 years, 1 month, 12 days
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I live in NW Chicago suburb.

"Damppa" of Jack, Laney, Leah and Joshua.

I have entered relatives, all Chicago Mayors, all Illinois Governors, and all of "haunted" White Cemetery.

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Roy Fredrick
6626269
BIO: Nick Name "Private Joe"
6626269 JOSEPH WILSON FIFER. This distinguished gentleman was 4e elected Governor of Illinois November 6, 1888. He was popularly known during the campaign as "Private Joe." He had served with great devotion to his country during the Rebellion, in the Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. A native of Virginia, he was born in 1840. His parents, John and Mary (Daniels) Fifer, were American born, though of German descent. His father was a brick and stone mason, and an old Henry Clay Whig in politics. John and Mary Fifer had nine children, of whom Joseph was the sixth, and naturally with so large a family it was all the father could do to keep the wolf front the door; to say nothing of giving his children anything like good educational advantages.
Young Joseph attended school some in Virginia, but it was not a good school, and when his father removed to the West. in 1857, Joseph had not advanced much further titan the "First Reader."
Our subject was sixteen then and suffered a great misfortune in the loss of his mother. After the death of Mrs. Fifer, which occurred in Missouri, the family returned to Virginia, but remained only a short time, as during the same year Mr. Fifer came to Illinois. lie settled in McLean County and started a brickyard. Here Joseph and his brothers were put to work. The elder Fifer soon bought a farm near Bloomington and began life as an agriculturist. Here Joe worked and at-tended the neighboring school. He alternated farm-Work, brick-laying, and going to the district school for the succeeding, few years. It was all work and no play for Joe, yet. it by no means made a dull boy of him. All the time he was thinking of the great world outside. of which he had caught a glimpse when coming from Virginia, yet lie did not know just how he was going to get out into it. He could not feel that the woods around the new farm and the log cabin in which the family lived were to 110111 him. The opportunity to get out into the world was soon offered to young Joe. He traveled a dozen miles barefoot in company with his brother George, and enlisted in Company C. 33d Illinois Infantry; he being then twenty years old. In a few days
the regiment was sent to Camp Butler, and then over into Missouri, and saw some vigorous service there. After a second time helping to chase Price out of Missouri. the 33d Regiment went down to Milliken's Bend, and for several weeks "Private Joe" worked on Grant's famous ditch. The regiment then joined the forces operating against Fort Gibson and Vicksburg. Joe was on guard duty in the front ditches when the flag of surrender was run up on the 4th of July, and stuck the bayonet of his gun into the embankment and went into the city with the vanguard of Union soldiers.
The next day, July 5, the 33d joined the force after Johnston, who had been threatening Grant's rear;' and; finally an assault was made on him at Jackson, Miss. In this charge "Private Joe" fell. terribly wounded. He was loading his gun when a Minnie-ball struck him and passed entirely through his body. He was regarded as mortally wounded. His brother, George, who had been made a Lieutenant, proved to be the means of saving his life. The Surgeon told him unless he had ice his brother Joe could not live. It was fifty miles to the nearest point where ice could be obtained. and the roads were rough. A comrade, a McLean county man, who had been wounded, offered to make the trip. An ambulance was secured and the brother soldier started on the journey. lie returned with the ice, but the trip, owing to the roughness of the roads. was very hard on him. After a few months' careful nursing Mr. Fifer was able to come home. The 33d came home on a furlough, and when the boys were ready to return to the tented field. young Fifer was ready to go with them; for he was determined to finish his term of three years. He was mustered out in October, 1864, having been in the service three years and two months.
Private Joe" came out of the army a tall, tanned, and awkward young man of twenty-four. About all he possessed was ambition to be somebody—and pluck. Though at an age when most men have finished their college course, the young soldier saw that if lie was to be anybody he must have an education. Vet lie had no means to enable him to enter school as most young men do. He was determined to have an education. however, and that to him meant success. For the following four years he struggled with his books. He entered Wesleyan University Jan. 1. 1865. He was not a brilliant student, being neither at the head nor the foot of his class. He was in great earnest. however. studied hard and came forth with a well-stored and disciplined mind.
Immediately after being graduated he entered an office at Bloomington as a law student. He had already read law some, and as he continued to work hard, with the spur of poverty and prompting of ambition ever with him, he was ready to hang out his professional shingle in 1869. Being trustworthy he soon gathered about him some influential friends. In 1871 he was elected Corporation Counsel of Bloomington. In 1872 he was elected State's Attorney of McLean County. This office he held for eight years, when he took his seat in the State Senate. Here he served for four years. His ability to perform abundance of hard work made him a most valued member of the Legislature.
Mr. Fifer was married in 1870 to Gertie, daughter of William Lewis. of Bloomington. Mr. Fifer is six feet in height and is spare. weighing only 150 pounds. He has a swarthy complexion, keen black eyes. quick movement, and possesses a frank and sympathetic nature, and naturally makes friends wherever he goes. During the late Gubernatorial campaign his visits throughout the State proved a great power in his behalf. Ills happy faculty of winning the confidence and good wishes of those with whom he comes in personal contact is a source of great popularity. especially during a political battle. As a speaker he is fluent, his language is good. voice clear and agreeable, and manner forcible. His manifest earnestness in what he says as well as his tact as a public speaker, and his fluent and forceful language, makes him a most valuable campaign orator and a powerful pleader at the bar. At the Republican State Convention. held in May. 1888, Mr. Fifer was chosen as its candidate for Governor. He proved a popular nominee. and the name of "Private Joe" became familiar to everyone throughout the State. He waged a vigorous campaign, was elected by a good majority, and in due time assumed the duties of the Chief Executive of Illinois.[Portrait and Biographical Album of Pike and Calhoun Counties, Illinois]
Added by Roy Fredrick on Jan 08, 2016 3:09 PM
Roy Fredrick
6626269
BIO: Nick Name "Private Joe"
6626269 JOSEPH WILSON FIFER. This distinguished gentleman was 4e elected Governor of Illinois November 6, 1888. He was popularly known during the campaign as "Private Joe." He had served with great devotion to his country during the Rebellion, in the Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. A native of Virginia, he was born in 1840. His parents, John and Mary (Daniels) Fifer, were American born, though of German descent. His father was a brick and stone mason, and an old Henry Clay Whig in politics. John and Mary Fifer had nine children, of whom Joseph was the sixth, and naturally with so large a family it was all the father could do to keep the wolf front the door; to say nothing of giving his children anything like good educational advantages.
Young Joseph attended school some in Virginia, but it was not a good school, and when his father removed to the West. in 1857, Joseph had not advanced much further titan the "First Reader."
Our subject was sixteen then and suffered a great misfortune in the loss of his mother. After the death of Mrs. Fifer, which occurred in Missouri, the family returned to Virginia, but remained only a short time, as during the same year Mr. Fifer came to Illinois. lie settled in McLean County and started a brickyard. Here Joseph and his brothers were put to work. The elder Fifer soon bought a farm near Bloomington and began life as an agriculturist. Here Joe worked and at-tended the neighboring school. He alternated farm-Work, brick-laying, and going to the district school for the succeeding, few years. It was all work and no play for Joe, yet. it by no means made a dull boy of him. All the time he was thinking of the great world outside. of which he had caught a glimpse when coming from Virginia, yet lie did not know just how he was going to get out into it. He could not feel that the woods around the new farm and the log cabin in which the family lived were to 110111 him. The opportunity to get out into the world was soon offered to young Joe. He traveled a dozen miles barefoot in company with his brother George, and enlisted in Company C. 33d Illinois Infantry; he being then twenty years old. In a few days
the regiment was sent to Camp Butler, and then over into Missouri, and saw some vigorous service there. After a second time helping to chase Price out of Missouri. the 33d Regiment went down to Milliken's Bend, and for several weeks "Private Joe" worked on Grant's famous ditch. The regiment then joined the forces operating against Fort Gibson and Vicksburg. Joe was on guard duty in the front ditches when the flag of surrender was run up on the 4th of July, and stuck the bayonet of his gun into the embankment and went into the city with the vanguard of Union soldiers.
The next day, July 5, the 33d joined the force after Johnston, who had been threatening Grant's rear;' and; finally an assault was made on him at Jackson, Miss. In this charge "Private Joe" fell. terribly wounded. He was loading his gun when a Minnie-ball struck him and passed entirely through his body. He was regarded as mortally wounded. His brother, George, who had been made a Lieutenant, proved to be the means of saving his life. The Surgeon told him unless he had ice his brother Joe could not live. It was fifty miles to the nearest point where ice could be obtained. and the roads were rough. A comrade, a McLean county man, who had been wounded, offered to make the trip. An ambulance was secured and the brother soldier started on the journey. lie returned with the ice, but the trip, owing to the roughness of the roads. was very hard on him. After a few months' careful nursing Mr. Fifer was able to come home. The 33d came home on a furlough, and when the boys were ready to return to the tented field. young Fifer was ready to go with them; for he was determined to finish his term of three years. He was mustered out in October, 1864, having been in the service three years and two months.
Private Joe" came out of the army a tall, tanned, and awkward young man of twenty-four. About all he possessed was ambition to be somebody—and pluck. Though at an age when most men have finished their college course, the young soldier saw that if lie was to be anybody he must have an education. Vet lie had no means to enable him to enter school as most young men do. He was determined to have an education. however, and that to him meant success. For the following four years he struggled with his books. He entered Wesleyan University Jan. 1. 1865. He was not a brilliant student, being neither at the head nor the foot of his class. He was in great earnest. however. studied hard and came forth with a well-stored and disciplined mind.
Immediately after being graduated he entered an office at Bloomington as a law student. He had already read law some, and as he continued to work hard, with the spur of poverty and prompting of ambition ever with him, he was ready to hang out his professional shingle in 1869. Being trustworthy he soon gathered about him some influential friends. In 1871 he was elected Corporation Counsel of Bloomington. In 1872 he was elected State's Attorney of McLean County. This office he held for eight years, when he took his seat in the State Senate. Here he served for four years. His ability to perform abundance of hard work made him a most valued member of the Legislature.
Mr. Fifer was married in 1870 to Gertie, daughter of William Lewis. of Bloomington. Mr. Fifer is six feet in height and is spare. weighing only 150 pounds. He has a swarthy complexion, keen black eyes. quick movement, and possesses a frank and sympathetic nature, and naturally makes friends wherever he goes. During the late Gubernatorial campaign his visits throughout the State proved a great power in his behalf. Ills happy faculty of winning the confidence and good wishes of those with whom he comes in personal contact is a source of great popularity. especially during a political battle. As a speaker he is fluent, his language is good. voice clear and agreeable, and manner forcible. His manifest earnestness in what he says as well as his tact as a public speaker, and his fluent and forceful language, makes him a most valuable campaign orator and a powerful pleader at the bar. At the Republican State Convention. held in May. 1888, Mr. Fifer was chosen as its candidate for Governor. He proved a popular nominee. and the name of "Private Joe" became familiar to everyone throughout the State. He waged a vigorous campaign, was elected by a good majority, and in due time assumed the duties of the Chief Executive of Illinois.[Portrait and Biographical of Pike and Calhoun Counties, Illinois]



Added by Roy Fredrick on Jan 08, 2016 3:05 PM
C R Cole
Thomas Wynne
Scott Thomas Wynne was buried at Ducketts farm which was the Quaker burial ground. Philadelphia has a long history of building on cemeteries. Ducketts farm is located at what is today 30th st Station or the Post Office Building.

There are multiple Thomas Wynnes because the cemetery is not defined. GramereC@aol.com Can we add Ducketts Farm Quaker Burial Ground?
Added by C R Cole on Jul 18, 2015 6:24 AM
LoveHistory
White Cemetery
If you are not the creator of the cemetery page, then how can this reselling of grave sites be published on Find A Grave?
Added by LoveHistory on Jan 31, 2014 12:26 PM
LoveHistory
White Cemetery
Are you the creator of the cemetery?
If so, I just found this in Cuba Township's newsletter and you might want to post this.
http://www.cubatownship.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/2012-Fall.pdf

Probably too late for some but, how awful this is reselling grave plots. You can credit me with the discovery, if you wish.

Bonnie Duresa
Added by LoveHistory on Jan 31, 2014 12:24 PM
LoveHistory
White Cemetery
Re Christian (Christopher ) Schumacher died Oct 20, 1927.
Front page news of Barrington Review October 27, 1927,
It states his eldest son William shot him on Oct 20th.
The article goes on & says, William confessed to the shooting, because his father had been abusive for many years toward the entire family. I didn't look further for the obit, maybe you might be interested in posting this information or researching further. It was front page news in 1927. How sad...
Thanks
Bonnie
Added by LoveHistory on Jan 30, 2014 10:26 PM
Dr B
Cary Family
Scott thanks for the Cary transfer. My wife is a descendant of the Cary family.
Added by Dr B on Dec 27, 2013 9:13 AM
ForgetMeNot
transfer
Thank you for the transfer of the Wallace Bruso memorial. I have already made the additions. Have a nice week!
Added by ForgetMeNot on Nov 11, 2013 5:30 PM
Richard O. Rotenberry
RE: Hamrick Familys& Entrekin Familys
OK, thanks. Linda said that you might be related. I am a direct descendant of the Entrekin, Smith, Hamrick, and Rotenberry familys. if you run into any information to share, please do. Sicerely, Richard Rotenberry, Panama City, Fla.
Added by Richard O. Rotenberry on Sep 13, 2013 7:03 AM
Richard O. Rotenberry
Hamrick Familys& Entrekin Familys
Scott Maxwell, I was told by a distant cousin, Linda Ellis that you are also a cousin. I am a descendant of the Hamrick's of Wayne County, Ms., and the Entrekins of Buckatunna, Ms. I have the Entrekin genealogy book on Descendants of John Bryant Entrekin of South Mississippi, as does Linda. I felt that we should compare notes. Sincerely, Richard Rotenberry, Panama City, Fla. great grandson of William Jasper Entrekin...
Added by Richard O. Rotenberry on Sep 05, 2013 8:26 PM
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