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PFC Horace Urban "Urb" Wood
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Birth: Dec. 4, 1894
Round Rock
Williamson County
Texas, USA
Death: Oct. 8, 1918
Romagne-sous-Montfaucon, France

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION

Horace U. Wood
Private First Class, U.S. Army
141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division
Entered the Service from: Texas
Died: October 8, 1918
Missing in Action
Tablets of the Missing at Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery
Romagne, France
Awards: French Croix de Guerre

Horace Urban 'Urb' Wood was born in Round Rock, Texas, on December 4, 1894. His family moved to Cuero, Texas where his father published the Cuero Record. The Wood family moved to Seguin, Texas in 1904, where his father, Horace Greeley Wood, purchased the Guadalupe Gazette newspaper. Urb was possessed of a bright mind and acquired a knowledge of the printing business while his father was publisher of The Gazette. In 1912, he left his brother, T. Vincent Wood to operate the The Gazette, while he went to San Diego, California, where his parents had retired. After a couple of years, Urb returned to Seguin and became editor of The Gazette in 1914 and held that position until 1917, when he entered the armed forces. Urb was accepted by the National Guard and was subsequently attached to Company M of the 141 Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division. Following training in July 1918, Urb's Company M, along with the rest of the 36th sailed for France.

Horace Urban Wood was killed on October 8, 1918 near St. Etienne, France. Urb and a fellow soldier ventured over the top of their trench to try to rescue a fallen comrade when heavy artillery fire intensified, causing them to seek refuge in a shell hole in "No Man's Land" between the two armies. Three heavy artillery shells scored direct hits within that shell hole at almost the same time.

A letter sent to a newspaper offered this description, "Not of a belligerent disposition but with an intensive love of country, Urban Wood's patriotic zeal could not be calculated. He entered military life determined to do his bit in making the world a decent place in which to live. He died nobely -- bravely; and now he has paid the supreme sacrifice."

Horace Urban Wood was awarded posthumously the French Croix de Guerre.
The American Legion H. U. Wood Post 245 received the original awards March 14, 1987.
(They are displayed at the American Legion Post)

H. U. Wood Post 245, Seguin, Texas, was organized in 1921. The Post was named in honor of Army Private Horace Urban Wood, this highly patriotic young man, who was killed in action in France

PLAQUE:
Presented to San Diego Post no. 6 American Legion by Gen. and Mrs. Marshall O. Terry, November 11, 1925 reads:

1917-1919
IN HONOR OF THE MEN AND WOMEN OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY WHO ANSWERED THE CALL OF THEIR COUNTRY IN THE WORLD WAR AND TO PERPETUATE THE MEMORY OF THESE HONORED DEAD WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN IT'S SERVICE....Horace Urban Wood........


For A PORTRAIT OF A PATRIOT; A Tribute to Horace Urban Wood 1894-1918, namesake of the H.U. Wood American Legion Post--Seguin Texas please see:
http://www.seguinlegion.org/huwood/portrait%20of%20a%20patriot.pdf.

NEWSPAPER ARTICLE: The Seguin Gazette-Enterprise › 1987 › March › 1Tuesday 7 March 1987 › Page 10
Wood's story is told during ceremonies at Seguin Legion The story of how Horace Urban Wood, the namesake of the H.U. Wood American Legion Post No. 245 in Seguin, died during a battle in World War I was recounted Saturday night as the post officially received the four original American and French honors posthumously awarded to Wood following the end of the war. John C. Taylor, publisher emeritus of the Seguin Gazette-Enterprise, told the story of how Wood had entered the war in the summer of 1917 at the age 22. At the time of entry into the armed services, Wood was editor of the Guadalupe Gazette newspaper. Wood was described as a "highly patriotic, keenly sensitive young man," and Urb, as he was called, immediately following America's entry into the war on April 6,1917, sought to enter the armed forces. He was ultimately accepted by the National Guard a few weeks later, and his training for war commenced shortly thereafter. He was attached to Company M of the 141st Infantry, a unit that soon became a part of the Panther Division, Texas' famed 36th Division. Wood and the rest of the 36th sailed for France in July 1918. As Taylor told the crowd at the American Legion Hall Saturday night, little is known of Wood's first two months (July and August 1918) in France. "There were occasional contacts with home from a series of locations in France as Urb's unit neared the front line trenches. But it took until the day following Armistice Day for his parents to receive word that their son and his unit had advanced to the trenches a month earlier," Taylor wrote in a prepared speech. "That word came in the form of a personal letter from their son, a letter received on the morning of November 12, 1918. Urb's letter was in two parts, having been started when he was billeted near a French village, and, finally being concluded by the young soldier as he neared those front line trenches." Later that same day, at 6:03 p.m. to be exact, the family received word of Wood's death in the form of a telegram. It read, "Deeply regret to inform you that Private Horace U. Wood Infantry is officially reported as killed in action October eighth. Harris, Adjutant General." According to Taylor's speech, Wood's mother never truly survived the loss of her son. She became frail, and her health withered over the next few years as she searched through every agency of government for evidence of the location or burial site of her son. Actual details of his death were alow in arriving. "It was finally reported that Urb and a fellow soldier, Pvt Albert Domstad, had ventured 'over the top' of their trench in the late afternoon of October 8 to try rescuing a fallen comrade. Heavy artillery firing immediately intensified, causing the two soldiers to seek momentary refuge in a shell hole in 'No Man's Land' between the two armies. "Three heavy artillery shells scored direct hits within that shell hole almost at the same time. "A report written six months later, April 8, 1919, from Roffsy Yonne, France by Sgt. R.R. Johnson, of the 36th Division School, confirmed again that Urb and his fellow soldier 'were both instantly killed by three direct hits of artillery fire about 6 p.m. of Oct. 1918, in extreme northern portion of a small woodland about three kilometers east of St. Etienne."' Taylor also noted that there has been some confusion as to the exact date of death—Oct. 8 or 10. Company M suffered extremely heavy losses throughout the battle near St. Etienne, with the great majority of its officers and men losing their lives. A story printed in the San Antonio Light claimed that the unit had been "betrayed by a German spy into almost certain death." Taylor also noted that many testimonials about Wood were sent to both the local newspaper as well as those in San Antonio. It was three years later that the new American Legion post here was named in his honor. Taylor also eluded to Wood's life before he entered the armed services. Wood's father, Horace Greely Wood, could himself be the subject of acclaim as a true pioneer of newspaper journalism in Texas, Taylor wrote. He was the publisher of the Round Rock newspaper when the outlaw, Sam Bass, was cornered and slain atop a small mountain nearby. Lawmen had pursued Bass to that site, and Wood was on hand nearby to write the original story about the incident. In the 1880s he moved his family to Cuero where he commenced publication of the Cuero Record. In 1904, he again moved the family, this time to Seguin where he'd purchased the Guadalupe Gazette from the William Bryan family. The young Urb Wood had been born in Round Rock on Dec. 4, 1894, and had moved with the family first to Cuero and then to Seguin. In 1912, when the family moved to San Diego, Calif, he went with the others, leaving brother Vince behind to run the newspaper. But he soon returned. He was the editor from 1914 until the time he entered the service. His father had been born in Springfield, 111. in 1863. He died in San Diego, Calif, in 1933. His mother, Annie Marie Dooley Wood, was born in 1860. She followed her husband in death in 1954. She was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland. Vince died Nov. 15, 1985, at Long Beach, Calif. A sister, Aileen Marie Jackson Martin, died in 1968 at San Diego, Calif. Survivors include two brothers, L.A. and Howard. Both live in California; and a sister, Agnes Louise Purcell, who also lives in California. Howard returned to Seguin several years ago to write a regular column for the Gazette.

Four honors were received by the local H. U. Wood post in Urbs honor. They include the U.S. Army Award of Honor, a portrait of Columbia signed by President Woodrow Wilson, the French Croix de Guerre (Cross of War) and an inscription from the president of France.
 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Horace Greeley Wood (1863 - 1933)
  Annie Marie Dooley Wood (1860 - 1954)
 
 Siblings:
  Thomas Vincent Wood (1892 - 1985)*
  Horace Urban Wood (1894 - 1918)
  Aileen Marie Wood Martin (1895 - 1968)*
  Howard Justin Wood (1898 - 1987)*
  Lucien Adrian Wood (1901 - 1989)*
  Agnes Louise Wood Purcell (1902 - 1991)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Note: "MISSING IN ACTION"
 
Burial:
Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial
Romagne-sous-Montfaucon
Departement de la Meuse
Lorraine, France
 
Created by: anne
Record added: Sep 28, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 59349739
PFC Horace Urban Urb Wood
Added by: anne
 
PFC Horace Urban Urb Wood
Added by: anne
 
PFC Horace Urban Urb Wood
Added by: anne
 
 
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RIP
- Texas WW1 Honor Roll
 Added: Jan. 10, 2017
Sorely missed at home but surely an enhancement in the heavens.
- anne
 Added: Aug. 5, 2012
 
 
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