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Montrose Whiting Morris
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Birth: Mar. 20, 1861
Death: Apr., 1916

Architect. Born in Hempstead, Long Island, his family moved to Brooklyn and he was educated in Brooklyn public schools and at the Peekskill Academy. Morris studied under Manhattan architect Charles W. Clinton, who with his partner, Hamilton Russell, were responsible for some of NY's most iconic buildings, including the 7th Regiment Armory, on Park Ave, the Apthorp and Graham Court Apartments, and the Moorish style Masonic Temple, now famous as the New York City (Dance) Center. In 1883, after seven years with the Clinton firm, Morris opened up his own office on Exchange Place, which he maintained until his death. Morris bought about half the block of Hancock Street, between Marcy and Thompkins Avenues in Bedford, and on a 20 foot lot, designed and built a home that became both his residence and his showroom. The houses he designed on Hancock Street are among his best, and the area contains the largest concentration of his work still standing. 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Florence Gould Travis Morris (1870 - 1933)
 
 Children:
  LeRoy C. Morris (1890 - 1946)*
  Geraldine Morris Fiske (1894 - 1972)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Green-Wood Cemetery
Brooklyn
Kings County (Brooklyn)
New York, USA
Plot: Sec 203 Lot 28310
 
Created by: BKGenie
Record added: Nov 12, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 44245881
Montrose Whiting Morris
Added by: BKGenie
 
Montrose Whiting Morris
Added by: BKGenie
 
Montrose Whiting Morris
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Russ Dodge
 
 
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Click on image for full size.


- BKGenie
 Added: Nov. 18, 2009
 
 
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