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Anna Brockmeyer Raab Benda
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Birth: Apr. 17, 1879
Death: Jun. 28, 1959

Anna Brockmeyer, Peter Raab's second wife, was the sister of his first wife, Emilie Brockmeyer. Emilie Brockmeyer Raab died in 1900 and is buried in the cemetery of St. Joseph RCC, Fullerton, Baltimore County.

Peter and Emilie had three children who survived to adulthood: George Peter (1891-1953), John Peter (1893-1956), and Gregory R. Raab 1898-1944)

Anna bore Peter Raab eight more children:: Charles Alphonsus (approx. 1901-1903); Anna Mary; George Aloysius (approx. 1911-1912); Francesca Agnes, called Frances; Peter Andrew; Christina, and Frederick Warren.

After Peter Raab's death, Anna apparently remarried.

Thanks to C. Herr, whose research uncovered her second husband's full name: Charles T. Benda. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Richard J Brockmeyer (1826 - 1913)
  Emilie Brockmeyer (1839 - 1899)
 
 Spouse:
  Peter Raab (1864 - 1916)
 
 Siblings:
  Charles Brockmeyer (1863 - 1928)*
  Emilie Brockmeyer Raab (1871 - 1900)*
  Anna Brockmeyer Raab Benda (1879 - 1959)
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Inscription:
Daughter
 
Burial:
Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery
Baltimore
Baltimore City
Maryland, USA
 
Maintained by: waldonia
Originally Created by: CHerr
Record added: Dec 21, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 82222182
Anna <i>Brockmeyer</i> Raab Benda
Added by: CHerr
 
Anna <i>Brockmeyer</i> Raab Benda
Added by: CHerr
 
Anna <i>Brockmeyer</i> Raab Benda
Added by: CHerr
 
 
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- waldonia
 Added: Sep. 2, 2013
 
 
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