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Find all Nonakas in:
 • Temple Hill Cemetery
 • Raymond
 • Lethbridge Census Division
 • Alberta
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Sode Nonaka
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Birth: unknown
Death: unknown

The individuals named on this memorial likely died between 1887 and 1942. Official emigration to Canada commenced in 1887 with the opening of a regular steamship service between Yokohama and Canada. The enforced relocation of people of Japanese origin from the west coast began in 1942 after the Pearl Harbor attack.
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1942
January 16 Order-in-Council P.C. 365 creates a 100-mile ‘protected area' on the coast of British Columbia from which male enemy aliens are excluded.
February 7 All male Japanese Canadian citizens between the ages of 18 and 45 are ordered to be removed from a 100-mile-wide zone along the coast of British Columbia.
February 24 Order-in-Council P.C. 1486 empowers the Minister of Justice to control the movements of all persons of Japanese origin in the protected area.
February 26 Mass evacuation of Japanese Canadians begins. Some are given only 24 hours notice. Cars, cameras and radios are confiscated for "protective measures". A curfew is imposed.
March 4 Under Order-in-Council P.C. 1665 Japanese Canadians are ordered to turn over property and belongings to the Custodian of Enemy Alien Property as a "protective measure only".
March 16 First arrivals at Vancouver's Hastings Park pooling centre. All Japanese Canadian mail is censored from this date.
March 25 British Columbia Security Commission initiates a scheme of forcing men to road camps and women and children to "ghost town" detention camps.
April 21 First arrivals at detention camp in Greenwood, British Columbia.
May 21 First arrivals at camps at Kaslo, New Denver, Slocan, Sandon and Tashme, British Columbia.
June 29 Under Order-in-Council P.C. 5523 Director of Soldier Settlement is given authority to buy or lease confiscated Japanese Canadian farms. 572 farms are turned over without consulting owners.
November 30 First Kaslo issue of The New Canadian is published. The newspaper and its staff are moved to the "ghost town" on Kootenay Lake in late October. The New Canadian becomes the primary source of information between the various camps and across the country and is used by the government to disseminate information.
By the end of the year, approximately 12,029 persons are in detention camps in the interior of British Columbia, 945 men are in enforced labour camps, 3,991 are placed as labourers on sugar beet farms in the Prairie provinces, 1,161 are in voluntary self-supporting sites outside the ‘protected area', 1,359 are given special work permits, 699 are interned in prisoner-of-war camps in Ontario, 42 are repatriated to Japan, 111 are in detention in Vancouver and 105 are in hospital in Hastings Park, approximately 2,000 were living outside the ‘protected area' and allowed to remain in place but required to register and give up prohibited items, and subject to restriction of activities.
1943
January 19 Order-in-Council P.C. 469 allows the government, through the Custodian of Enemy Alien Property, to sell Japanese-Canadian property held in custody without owners' consent.
People are gradually released from camps if they agree to move east of the Rocky Mountains. They encounter severe hostility from the public. Many cities, among them the City of Toronto, are closed to persons of Japanese ancestry.
The Japanese Canadian Committee for Democracy and the Co-Operative Committee on Japanese Canadians (a white, mainly Christian group) are organized to assist in re-settlement.
1944
August The Government announces a program to disperse Japanese Canadians throughout the country, to separate those who are "loyal" from those who are "disloyal", and to "repatriate" the disloyal to Japan.
1945
January At the request of the British government, Japanese Canadians are allowed to enlist.
Those remaining in the camps are canvassed for "loyalty", and told to choose between "repatriation" to Japan and immediate movement east of the Rocky Mountains. Some 10,632 people, facing uncertainty and unable to confirm new residences east of the Rockies, sign repatriation forms. Nearly half later apply to rescind their signatures.
Orders-in-Council P.C. 7335, 7356 and 7357 empower the government to assess the loyalty of Japanese Canadians, order their deportation and strip them of citizenship.
January-May 150 Japanese Canadians volunteer for service with the Canadian army in the Far East.
April 13 Beginning of intimidation campaign towards Japanese Canadians living in British Columbia to move to Eastern Canada or be deported to Japan.
September 2 Japan surrenders after atomic bombs are dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
1946
January 1 On expiry of the measures under the War Measures Act, the National Emergency Transitional Powers Act is used to keep the measures against Japanese Canadians in place.
May 31 "Repatriation" begins; 3,964 go to Japan, many of whom are Canadian citizens.
December The Privy Council upholds a Supreme Court decision that the deportation orders are legal. By this time more than 4,000 people have been deported to Japan.
1947
January 24 Federal cabinet order-in-council on deportation of Japanese Canadians repealed after protests by churches, academics, journalists and politicians.
April The Citizenship Act extends the franchise to Canadians of Chinese and South Asian origin, but excludes Japanese Canadians and aboriginal peoples.


 
 
Inscription:
DURING THE EARLY 1940S AT THE OUTBREAK OF THE PACIFIC WAR, ALL PERSONS OF JAPNESE ORIGIN WERE FORCIBLY REMOVED FROM THE WEST COASTY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.

ALL JAPANESE OWNED CHURCHES AND TEMPLES WITHIN A 100 MILE AREA INLAND FROM THE B.C. COASTLINE WERE THEN CLOSED. THE'OKOTSU' (ASHES) OF MANY DECEASED LOVED ONES HAD BEEN PLACED IN SAFEKEEPING AT MANY OF THESE TEMPLES. AT THECLOSURE OF THESE TEMPLES, THE ASHES WERE SHIPPED TO THE RAMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH, THE ONLY CHURCH IN SERVICE EAST OF THE ROCKIES. THUS THE RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH BECAME THE CUSTODIAN OF THE ASHES OF OVER 100 DECEASED LOVED ONES OF JAPANESE ORIGIN.ORIGINALLY THESE ASHES WERE HOUSED IN A COLUMBARIUM ERECTED ON THIS SITE.

THIS MONUMENT IS DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF THESE CANADIANS OF JAPANESE ORIGIN WHO HAD PASSED ON BEFORE THEOUTBREAK OF THE PACIFIC WAR AND THE ENDING THE ENSUING MASS EVACUATION FROM THE B.C. COAST.
ERECTED BY:
• RAYMOND BUDDHIST CHURCH
• ALBERTA HISTORICAL RESOURCES FOUNDATION
• JAPANESE CANADIAN REDRESS FOUNDATION
• CHRISTENSEN SALMON FUNERAL HOME
• TOWN OF RAYMOND

 
Burial:
Temple Hill Cemetery
Raymond
Lethbridge Census Division
Alberta, Canada
 
Created by: Bear Hugs
Record added: Jan 23, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 104062171
Sode Nonaka
Added by: Linda
 
Sode Nonaka
Added by: Linda
 
Sode Nonaka
Added by: Bear Hugs
 
 
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