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Sir William Cockayne
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Birth: 1561
Death: Oct. 20, 1626

He was a seventeenth-century London merchant, alderman, and, in 1619, Lord Mayor. He was second son of William Cokayne of Baddesley Ensor, Warwickshire, merchant of London, sometime governor of the Eastland Company, by Elizabeth, daughter of Roger Medcalfe of Meriden, Warwickshire; and was descended from William Cokayne of Sturston, Derbyshire, a younger son of Sir John Cokayne of Ashbourne in that county. Apprenticed at Christmas 1582 to his father, he was made free of the Skinners' Company by patrimony 28 March 1590. On his father's death, 28 November 1599, he succeeded to his business. He was sheriff of London 1609, and alderman of Farringdon Without 160913, of Castle Baynard 161318, of Lime Street 161825, of Broad Street 1625 till his death. On 8 June 1616, King James I honoured him with his presence at dinner at his house in Broad Street (Cokayne House, exactly opposite St. Peter's Church), where he dubbed him a knight. During Cockayne's mayoralty (161920) King James visited St. Paul's Cathedral with a view to raising money to complete the spire, and was received by Cockayne in great state. A pageant entitled 'The Triumphs of Love and Antiquity' was performed; the entertainments, which started at Cockayne's house on Monday and Tuesday in Easter week 1620, terminated on Saturday with service for the lords of the privy council, when the marriage was celebrated between Charles, lord Howard, baron of Effingham, and Mary, Cockayne's daughter. The king frequently consulted him, both in council and privately. In 1614, while serving as governor of the Eastland Company of English merchants, Cockayne devised a plan to dye and dress English cloth, England's main export at the time, before shipping it abroad. Cockayne convinced James I to grant him a monopoly on cloth exports as a part of this plan, intended to increase the profits of English merchants, Cockayne's in particular, while boosting royal customs duties through bypassing Dutch merchants. The scheme failed as the Dutch refused to purchase finished cloth, and the English cloth trade was depressed for decades as a result.
 
 
Burial:
Saint Paul's Cathedral
London
City of London
Greater London, England
 
Created by: julia&keld
Record added: Aug 25, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 75475392
 

 
 
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