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Clara Boynton Cole
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Birth: Sep. 22, 1869
Atlanta
Fulton County
Georgia, USA
Death: Aug. 22, 1951
Atlanta
Fulton County
Georgia, USA

Wife of F. W. Cole

Daughter of Charles Boynton and Myra Haygood. She graduated from Wesleyan College. She married on January 10, 1894. Her husband Frederick graduated from Vanderbilt University. They were the parents of Laura H, Frederick W Jr, Clara B, Elizabeth, and Charles Boynton.


Atlanta and environs: a chronicle of its people and events, Volume 1 by Franklin Miller Garrett, Harold H. Martin

p. 176

Mrs. Frederick Winship Cole, the former Clara Rawson Boynton, died at 91. Her father established one of the city's first department stores in 1860 - Chamberlain, Cole and Boynton. She was educated at Wesleyan College and Attended Trinity Methodist Church, founded by her uncle, Atticus, G. Haygood. Her husband was the first president of the Georgia Association of Insurance Agencies. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Charles Edward Rawson Boynton (1836 - 1890)
  Myra A. Haygood Boynton (1847 - 1927)
 
 Spouse:
  Frederick Winship Cole (1868 - 1950)*
 
 Children:
  Elizabeth Cole Shaw (1906 - 1973)*
 
 Sibling:
  Clara Boynton Cole (1869 - 1951)
  Martha Askew Boynton Craig (1874 - 1958)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Oakland Cemetery
Atlanta
Fulton County
Georgia, USA
 
Created by: L Ferree
Record added: Oct 04, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 77613691
Clara <i>Boynton</i> Cole
Added by: L Ferree
 
Clara <i>Boynton</i> Cole
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Tim Oliver
 
 
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.

8th cousin 3X removed
- Allen Boynton
 Added: Dec. 2, 2011
 
 
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