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 • Rose Hill Cemetery
 • Columbia
 • Maury County
 • Tennessee
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Esther Jackson Abernathy
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Birth: 1898
Tennessee, USA
Death: 1972
Tennessee, USA

Esther Jackson was born in 1898 the youngest daughter of James and Frances "Fannie" Jackson of Nolensville, Tennessee where James had established the town's sawmill. She worked as a teacher for many years. In 1924 she became the wife of Sidney Guy Abernathy, a native of Dyer County, Tennessee. Guy and Esther met and married in Columbia, Tennessee. They were soon blessed with the birth of a daughter, Evelyn, followed by two sons, Sidney Guy Abernathy Jr. and William Jackson Abernathy. In 1930 the family is listed as living on Jackson Highway in District 9 of Maury County, Tennessee. They have two children in the household with them - Evelyn age 5 years, 8 months and Sidney Jr., age 1 year, 3 months. Esther died in 1972 and was buried in the Rose Hill Cemetery in Columbia, Tennessee.
 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Sidney Guy Abernathy (1882 - 1952)
 
Inscription:
"ESTHER JACKSON ABERNATHY"
"1898 - 1979"
 
Burial:
Rose Hill Cemetery
Columbia
Maury County
Tennessee, USA
 
Maintained by: Mary Bob McClain
Originally Created by: Rick L. Gray
Record added: Sep 03, 2002
Find A Grave Memorial# 6747735
Esther <i>Jackson</i> Abernathy
Added by: Cheryl Martin
 
Esther <i>Jackson</i> Abernathy
Added by: Cheryl Martin
 
Esther <i>Jackson</i> Abernathy
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Mary Bob McClain
 
 
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- Rick L. Gray
 Added: Jun. 18, 2010

- Rick L. Gray
 Added: Dec. 8, 2009

- Mary Bob McClain
 Added: Feb. 25, 2006
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