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Gen Joseph Benjamin Palmer
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Flowers 1 to 50 (of 56 total)51 - 56 
For service rendered the Confederacy during our American Civil War. May you rest in peace, General.
- Daniel Moran
 Added: Nov. 4, 2016
 

- bob tarte
 Added: Jan. 30, 2016
 

- Hamilton Smith
 Added: May. 16, 2015
 
Your rememberance will last for eternity.
- Patrick Murphy
 Added: Jun. 2, 2014
 
Thank you Sir.
- Dixon In Dixie
 Added: May. 13, 2014
 

- shelby
 Added: Nov. 4, 2013
 

- MosherSt.Munger
 Added: Nov. 4, 2013
 

- Tracey Reid
 Added: Nov. 4, 2013
 

- Tracey Reid
 Added: Nov. 1, 2013
 

- Roxღed
 Added: Jul. 31, 2013
 

- Roxღed
 Added: Jul. 31, 2013
 

- Kathy Smith
 Added: Nov. 4, 2012
 

- Sgt. Rock
 Added: Nov. 4, 2012
 
Rest In Peace Brother.
- Treeoligy
 Added: Sep. 3, 2012
 
JOSEPH B. PALMER was raised in Rutherford Co., TN by his maternal grandparents (Joseph B. Johns and Elizabeth Vaughan) after the death of his mother. He was proud of the fact that he was named for his grandfather Johns.He attended Union University and taught school for one year after graduation.He then "read law" and studied with Hardy M. Burton, an attorney inMurfreesboro, TN. He was admitted to the bar in March of 1848 and then openedhis own office. He served in the Tennessee General Assembly for the 1849-50 and 1851-52 sessions. In 1854 he married Ophelia M. Burrus. They had only one child, Horace E. Palmer, before her death in 1856. Although initially opposed to succession, he organized a company and later a regiment. He was elected Colonel of this regiment - the Eleventh Tennessee Infantry (CSA).In 1862 his unit was captured with the fall of Ft. Donelson near Dover,Tennessee; he was imprisoned for 8 months at Fort Warren before beingexchanged. His regiment was reorganized. He was promoted to BrigadierGeneral in July of 1864 and at the end of the war was commanding allConfederate troops in Tennessee - which he surrendered and disbanded. Hereturned to Murfreesboro and the practice of law. His second marriage wasto Mrs. Margaret J. Mason of Pulaski, Tennessee in 1869. They had nochildren. In 1879 he was joined by his son in the firm of Palmer andPalmer. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge and the Methodist Church.("Rutherford County-History of Tennessee", by Goodspeed Publishing Co. 1887)THE DISTINGUISHED MILITARY SERVICE OF JOSEPH B. PALMER:Brigadier-General JOSEPH B. PALMER, at the beginning of the Civil War, was a prominent lawyer of Murfreesboro, Tenn. He opposed secession, and insisted that the South should make her fight in the Union. But like the vast majority of Southern Union men, he believed that his first allegiance was due to his State. So when Tennessee resolved upon secession, he obeyed her voice and raised a company for the defense of the South. Of this company he was elected captain, and when it, with nine other companies, was formed into the Eighteenth Tennessee regiment of infantry, Captain Palmer was unanimously elected colonel. This regiment was assigned to the army commanded by Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston. It formed a part of the army at Fort Donelson, sharing in the glories and disasters of that fierce conflict. When the fort was surrendered, February 16, 1862, Colonel Palmer and his men found themselves prisoners of war. He was kept in prison at Fort Warren until his exchange in August, 1862, then joined his regiment, which had also been just exchanged at Vicksburg. Shortly afterward the regiment was reorganized at Jackson, Miss., and re-elected Palmer as its colonel. In Breckinridge's brilliant, though unsuccessful charge at Murfreesboro on the 2d day of January, 1863, Palmer's regiment suffered heavily, and Palmer was himself badly wounded in three places. These wounds incapacitated him for service for about four months, but he returned to his regiment in time for the battle of Chickamauga, where, while leading his command in one of the headlong charges of that hotly-contested field, he received another dangerous wound in the shoulder, which bled so profusely as to threaten death before help could come. It was not until the army reached Atlanta that he was in condition to resume his duties. Here he was appointed to the command of his brigade, and commissioned brigadier-general November 15, 1864. His brigade, formerly commanded by John C. Brown, comprised the Third, Eighteenth, Thirty-second, and Forty-fifth Tennessee regiments. In the campaign of Hood into Tennessee, this brigade was detached from the army at Nashville and send to co- operate with Bate and Forrest in a movement against Murfreesboro. On the retreat of the army, Palmer's brigade formed part of the force under Walthall and Forrest which brought up the rear, and did its duty so bravely as to win the applause of even the enemy. During the North Carolina campaign of 1865, all the decimated infantry regiments of Tennessee then serving under Johnston were consolidated into four regiments and placed in a brigade commanded by General Palmer. Mr. G. N. Baskette, of Nashville, Tenn. (Confederate Veteran, November 1897), relates a remarkable exploit of Palmer's brigade at the battle of Bentonville, the last one fought by the gallant army of Tennessee. On this occasion, "part of Palmer's brigade charged through the enemy's line and kept on to the rear of the Federal army, capturing a number of prisoners, and by a detour, after a long and painful march of about a week, rejoined the brigade." The same writer, summing up the character of General Palmer, says: "He was ever courteous to his subordinate officers and men in the line, and while maintaining proper discipline had always a warm sympathy for the boys in the trenches or on the march. On the battlefield he was cool and collected, bearing himself always as a leader who felt the weight of his responsibility, and yet was ever ready to brave any danger which promised to benefit the cause of which he was devoted."At the close of the war, General Palmer proved himself as good a citizen as he had been a soldier. He died on the 4th of November, 1890, mourned by his many friends and countrymen.
- James Goff
 Added: Jun. 17, 2012
 

- James Goff
 Added: Jun. 17, 2012
 

- Pipedreamer
 Added: Nov. 4, 2011
 

- Pipedreamer
 Added: Nov. 1, 2011
 

- Leon Edmund Basile
 Added: Feb. 12, 2011
 

- LaDene
 Added: Nov. 4, 2010
 
Your sacrifice has not been forgotten!
- Martha Reid 19 UDC
 Added: Sep. 2, 2010
 
Remembering and Honoring a True Southern Hero, A Confederate Soldier. Deo Vindice.
- Tony Smith SCV Camp 38, North Charleston S.C.
 Added: Jan. 20, 2010
 

- Tom Cummings
 Added: Nov. 4, 2009
 

- shelby
 Added: Nov. 4, 2009
 

- Cougar
 Added: Nov. 4, 2009
 

- Southernatheart
 Added: Nov. 4, 2009
 

- LaDene
 Added: Nov. 1, 2009
 

- Southernatheart
 Added: Nov. 1, 2009
 

- purple-lady
 Added: Apr. 12, 2009
 

- TD Miller
 Added: Nov. 1, 2008
 

-Anonymous
 Added: Nov. 1, 2007
 

- Kat
 Added: Nov. 1, 2007
 

- Scott and Robyn Phillips
 Added: Oct. 9, 2007
 

- Eclectic One
 Added: Oct. 4, 2007
 

- A Marine Daughter
 Added: Nov. 4, 2006
 
Deo Vindice, Sir.
- Bob Hufford
 Added: Nov. 1, 2006
 

- D K Railsback B
 Added: May. 13, 2006
 
REPOSE EN PAIX!
- quebecoise
 Added: Dec. 6, 2005
 
Rest Well,Sir. Thank You.
- Bob Hufford
 Added: Nov. 1, 2005
 
R I P
-Anonymous
 Added: Nov. 1, 2005
 
God Bless you.
Rest in Peace
- Trisha W.
 Added: Nov. 4, 2004
 
Happy Birthday, General.
- The Proud Kentuckian
 Added: Nov. 1, 2004
 
Happy birthday sir! Thank you for your service to the South. Deo vindice.
- Kelley G
 Added: Nov. 1, 2004
 

- chlse
 Added: Nov. 1, 2004
 

- Allen
 Added: Mar. 17, 2004
 

- kimshockey (reb)
 Added: Oct. 17, 2003
 
Salute
- Brenda
 Added: Sep. 18, 2003
 

- quebecoise
 Added: Jun. 7, 2003
 
Thank you for defending our homeland. Deo vindice.
- Kelley G
 Added: May. 25, 2003
 
rest in peace, you fought for what you believed in. no one can ask for anything more.
-Anonymous
 Added: Nov. 2, 2002
 
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 56 total)51 - 56 
 

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