Nathaniel J. Barber

Nathaniel J. Barber

Birth
Death 1 Dec 1923
Burial Marshall, Harrison County, Texas, USA
Plot Section 5A
Memorial ID 15733433 · View Source
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C.S.A.; Husband of Hattie Vaughn Barber
"The LaFayette (AL) Sun" - December 6, 1923

Former Pioneer Is Dead In Texas.

N. J. Barber, aged 78 years, Confederate veteran, former citizen of Chambers County, died last Saturday at Marshall, Texas. Several relatives of the deceased still reside in this county. During the deceased's residence in Chambers county he lived about six miles north of LaFayette.

AND.....

"The LaFayette (AL) Sun" - January 2, 1924:

In Memoriam - N. J. Barber.

Mr. N. J. Barber died at 3:15 a.m., December 1, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. R. A. Patrick, in Marshall, Texas.
Mr. Barber was born in Chambers County, near LaFayette, Alabama, on July 4, 1845.
In the early 80's, he left Chambers county, Alabama, to take his family to Texas. For a number of years he made Winsboro, Texas, his home then he lived with his son, N. M. Barber, in Gilmer; and for the past twelve years he has made Marshall his home, and has impressed everyone with whom he came in contact with the stalwart nobility of his character. Everyone loved him because of his sterling qualities in making and keeping friends. For more than half a century he has served his friends and his country as a loyal, upright citizen.
Mr. Barber joined the Methodist Church when 13 years of age, and through all the years he has lived as his Master would have him. To his friends he was known to have high ideals, a happy way in taking life, and a never ending faith in his Master.
He is survived by three children: Mrs. S. P. Barber, of Carney, Oklahoma; Mrs. R. A. Patrick, of Marshall, Texas, and Mr. N. M. Barber, of Marshall, Texas. He has 13 grandchildren and he is also survived by a sister Mrs. M. J. Stephens, of Paul's Valley, Oklahoma. All his children were with him when the end came.
At the age of 17 Mr. Barber joined the Confederate Army. The Company F, of the 61st Alabama regiment under the command of Captain Zachery, to which he belonged, was made up in the LaFayette community. He was mustered into service at Montgomery, Alabama. He was put on guard duty for the first eight weeks of service at Pollard at which time he first saw the Yankees. It was on the Gulf of Mexico at Pensacola, Florida, that his company captured two large fishing boats. From Pensacola his company was sent to Richmond on a freight train; this was his first ride on a freight train. After arriving in Richmond, they camped in an old tobacco factory, and the next morning they were placed in line of march, and he marched into his first battle at White Oak Bottom. After being stationed there three days, his company made their way to Orange Courthouse. They skirmished on the Rappidane River until the latter part of April 1863. On May 1, 1863, camp was broken and they began to march to one knew not where. When General Lee called for sharpshooters in February of 1864, all men were tested. Mr. N. J. Barber was the first to be drawn out of his company as a sharpshooter. On the morning of May 5, 1864, yelling was heard in the rear of the march. Immediately all the men knew that Mars. Robert E. Lee was coming. They asked General Lee if there was danger ahead. The answer was, "Boys, you'll meet them at one o'clock." This was the Battle of the Wilderness. After three days fighting Mr. Barber's company was ordered to Spottsylvania. Here Mr. Barber captured a Yankee and a flag. It was later learned that his gun was empty and that the Yankee was loaded. His next battle was at Frazier's farm at Hanover Junction. He was later stationed near the crater where he heard the tunneling underground a number of days before the big blow-up. Mr. Barber was also in the battles of Winchester and Fisher's Hill.



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