Black Hills National Cemetery
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Black Hills National Cemetery

Sturgis, Meade County , South Dakota, USA

About

FAX: 605-347-0269
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, new railroads were laid across the Dakotas and aided in the development of numerous communities. In 1890, Pierre was chosen as the permanent capital of South Dakota. Twelve years later, in 1902, the Battle Mountain Sanitarium was established in nearby Hot Springs to aid in the care of veterans within the region. Cemeteries at both the Fort Meade Military Reservation and the former sanitarium eventually became a part of the National Cemetery System in 1973.
Monuments and Memorials
In 1990, a memorial carillon was dedicated at the cemetery. It was replaced in 2005.

A memorial to Korean War veterans was dedicated in 2002.

Bivouac of the Dead erected 2004. A 52 Charlie memorial was dedicated in 2007.

Medal of Honor Recipients
The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force that can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States. Recipients receive the Medal of Honor from the president on behalf of Congress. It was first awarded during the Civil War and eligibility criteria for the Medal of Honor have changed over time.

Recipients buried or memorialized here:

Sergeant Charles Windolph (Indian Wars). He received the Medal of Honor while serving in the U.S. Army, Troop H, 7th Cavalry, for actions at the Little Big Horn River, Montana Territory, June 25-26, 1876. Windolph died in 1950 and is buried in Section A, Site 239.

Other Burials
Senator Francis H. Case was transferred from a private cemetery on Dec. 3, 1981 and rests in Section F, Site 789.

Brigadier General Richard E. Ellsworth, Commander of Rapid City Air Force Base (which was renamed Ellsworth Air Force Base in his honor).


John Bear King of South Dakota enlisted in the U.S. Army on May 18, 1943. PFC Bear King was one of eleven known Lakota Code Talkers in the Pacific Theater during World War II. The 2008 Code Talkers Recognition Act honored all Code Talkers from World War I and World War II and awarded the Congressional Gold Medal to American Indian tribes whose members participated in the top secret program; individuals would receive a Congressional Silver Medal. In 2013, the Lakota Code Talkers received their medals. Bear King died September 2, 1949, and is one of two Lakota Code Talkers interred in a VA national cemetery (Section E, Site 1394).

Clarence Eugene Wolf Guts, native of South Dakota, enlisted in the U.S. Army on June 17, 1942. He was one of eleven known Lakota Code Talkers in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He served in the army until January 13, 1946, as the personal Code Talker for Gen. Mueller. The 2008 Code Talkers Recognition Act honored all Code Talkers from World War I and World War II, and awarded the Congressional Gold Medal to American Indian tribes whose members participated in the top secret program; individuals would receive a Congressional Silver Medal. In 2013, the Lakota Code Talkers received their medals. PFC Wolf Guts was the last living member of the Oglala Lakota Code Talkers from World War II. He died June 16, 2010, and is one of two Lakota Code Talkers interred in a VA national cemetery (Section H, Site 260).

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Photos

  • Added: 1 Jan 2000
  • Find a Grave Cemetery ID: 96818