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Darrell Landrum (#47662604)
 member for 4 years, 10 months, 2 days
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Bio Photo My main interest is in the Confederate Section of Old City Cemetery here in Lynchburg. With there being more than 2,200 soldiers resting there from all of the states of the Confederacy, the labor of love will continue for quite some time. So many of these men left home to never be heard from again. I am often times humbled walking around in this section. The staggering number of young and old men whose families have no idea where they are. I get the greatest feeling of elation when a current family member finds one of these men and the circle is closed when they are back with family. I owe the greatest debt of gratitude for member LJH who has helped me numerous times in correctly identifying the men.

*Please do not post death certificates on any of my memorials.*

If you are a family member to anyone of the memorials I have posted, I will not hesitate transferring the memorial over to your care. That is why I do this. All I ask is that you please use some tact when requesting a transfer or making a suggestion for an edit.

If you have a better quality photo of any grave marker than the ones I have posted on my memorials, please post it. If not, please don't post it. Thank you. I put a lot of effort into taking good quality photos. These last couple of years have been a learning experience, but I think I have got the hang of it, finally. I hope you don't mind my posting a photo to your memorial, even though you may already have one or more up. ***If you do not want my photo on your memorial, please let me know and I will remove it***. It is so very important to me to take a good quality photo as I want to make sure the info I put on a memorial is correct on the chance that a family member will find the information and be able to use it. I always spend a little extra time wiping off grass clippings or bird poop, but that is all. Sunny days are best for a good photo, morning shadows really make a stone pop. Photoshop is your friend as well :)

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 • 7,597 Memorials Added
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Ann, Art Wells, CDKetchen, Joan Mays, John Paul Neble..., LJH, Sandra Pearson, sandy walton
Messages left for Darrell Landrum (503)[Leave Message]
Janet Hickman
RE: James Madison Lambeth
the other memorial is not mine.
Added by Janet Hickman on Sep 01, 2016 5:27 AM
Janet Hickman
RE: James Madison Lambeth
the other memorial is not mine.
Added by Janet Hickman on Sep 01, 2016 5:27 AM
Janet Hickman
James Madison Lambeth
There is another memorial made back on July 2014, #133561729. Please merge
Added by Janet Hickman on Aug 31, 2016 5:36 AM
Casual Onlooker
Thanks for trying to get Lucile Dalton picture.
You said she is beside her parents in an unmarked grave. Do you happen to remember who they were so I can request a link for her? I appreciate all the hard work you do.
Added by Casual Onlooker on Aug 26, 2016 12:12 PM
cheryle54
John W Bryant
Thank you for your time and effort
on getting the info

Cheryle
Added by cheryle54 on Aug 25, 2016 5:04 AM
D. Goodboe
Patteson, Henrietta Temple "Hennie"
Darrell, thanks so much for the nice clear photo of Hennie's headstone. Would you also give your permission for me to post a copy to the page I have for her on Ancestry.com? I'm happy to credit you as photographer and donor. If you'd rather not see it there I understand.

A short life leaves few records and documenting her burial photographically is a big help. For me she's only a distant cousin but she did have a child and direct (and indirect) descendants who find her Findagrave page will be happy to see your work, I'm sure.
Added by D. Goodboe on Aug 24, 2016 12:19 PM
Henry Webber
RE: Fort Hill photo requests
I will see what I can find out from the cemetery office and let you know. Do you know their phone number as I live in California now. I use to live in Pamplin, Appomattox County, Virginia. Thanks, Henry
Added by Henry Webber on Aug 24, 2016 7:07 AM
Henry Webber
Claude Daniels
Thanks so much Darrell for the photo. Appreciate the photo to at least show where he is buried even though there is no marker at his grave. Thanks, Henry
Added by Henry Webber on Aug 24, 2016 7:05 AM
sew62
Pvt James R Hodo
Thank you sir, for posting the headstone photo to J R Hodo's memorial.

Added by sew62 on Aug 15, 2016 8:17 PM
Rebecca Reuben Dyer
RE: henry dupuy reamey and elsie gravely reamey
THIS WOULD BE ELSIE GRAVELY REAMEY'S UNCLE --
I WROTE THIS LONG AGO AND A PART OR TWO IS MISSING BUT IT IS A QUICK READ. Each sibling was super successful.

THANK YOU FOR THE TRANSFER. I APPRECIATE IT VERY MUCH.


Joseph Jackson Gravely was born on the 25th of September 1828 to Lewis Gravely and Rachel Martha 'Patsy' Dyer in Leatherwood, Henry County, Virginia. His grandparents were Joseph Gravely and Eleanor Cox and George Dyer and Rachel Dalton. Joseph Jackson was the namesake of his paternal grand father. Both grand fathers served in the American Revolution: Private Joseph Gravely served under the leadership of Captain Tarrant and Colonel Penn, and Lieut George Dyer served in George Washington's Army (Maryland Continental Line). In addition, brothers Peyton Gravely and Willis Gravely, uncles to Joseph Jackson, were tobacco growers who became internationally known for their plug tobacco. Parents, uncles and grand parents were distinguished citizens of Leatherwood, Henry County, Virginia.

After attending public schools, young Gravely engaged in farming and taught school. Later he became interested in law, studied it, was admitted to the bar and began the practice of law in the Old Dominion. Now established in a profession at age 22, on the 23rd of June in 1850 at the home of the Benjamin Marshall and Nancy Nance in Henry County, he took Miss Martha Jane Marshall, their daughter and one of his former students, as his bride. Their union would bring eight children. It should be noted that ---

As his uncles* had before him, Mr. Gravely turned to politics and was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates. He served two terms (1853 and 1854) in the Lower House of the Virginia General Assembly. In a state rich with history, the Virginia House of Delegates is considered the successor of the Virginia House of Burgesses which first convened in 1619 in the settlement of Jamestown, and is the oldest continuously functioning legislative body on this side of the world.
*Benjamin Dyer and brother David Dalton Dyer, and Peyton Gravely

Sometime around 1854, following Benjamin and Nancy Nance Marshall, Martha Jane’s parents, Mr. Gravely and his family left Henry County, Virginia, for Missouri where he would acquire land and build, according to his wife, “the prettiest log house I ever saw.” He also continued his career in law and politics. In 1860 as the Civil War was in its beginning, Mr. Gravely was a delegate to the Missouri Constitutional Convention and served as a representative in the Missouri State Senate for two terms (1862 and 1864).

During the American Civil War, or War Between the States, in many cases, brother was pitted against brother in their beliefs. This could not have been truer than in this family. Joseph Jackson Gravely organized and was Colonel of the 8th Missouri State Militia Cavalry Regiment in the Union Army. First cousin David Patterson Dyer* organized the 49th Missouri Volunteer Infantry in the Union Army and was Colonel of that Regiment, while his brother John Salmon Dyer was a Lieutenant in the Confederate Service. Back in Virginia, Francis B. Gravely, brother of Joseph Jackson Gravely, enlisted as a Private in the Danville Greys and served in the Confederate army until he was wounded at the battle of Gaines Mill. His obituary states he was considered by his fellow soldiers and by his commanding officers as being one of the bravest men in the service, and was commended for his display of valor. Thomas Marshall Gravely, the youngest brother of Joseph Jackson Gravely and namesake of the Marshall family, was 2nd Lieut of Company F, 42nd Virginia Infantry Regiment, CSA. Sadly, First cousin and Missouri State Representative George Washington Dyer, eldest brother to David Patterson Dyer, had been among the Missouri legislators jailed when the Union troops seized the Legislature in 1862. He died there in the jail in McDowell, Missouri. This was not mentioned in the Autobiography of David Patterson Dyer.
* David Patterson Dyer’s career in brief: lawyer, State’s attorney, legislator/1862, Secretary of State (Missouri)/1866, Representative 41st Congress/1869, U.S. Attorney.

After the war, Joseph Jackson Gravely was elected to the U. S. House of Representatives (Fortieth Congress) as a Republican. He represented the constituents of the 4th District of Missouri in the term from March 4, 1867, to March 3, 1869. In addition, in 1868 he was the Alternate Delegate from Missouri to the Republican National Convention, and was elected Liberal Republican Lieutenant Governor. Unlike Mr. Gravely’s native state of Virginia, the Lieutenant Governor in Missouri is elected separately from the Governor and may be a member of a different political party. He served with the 20th Governor of Missouri, Benjamin Gratz Brown, also a Liberal Republican. Lieutenant Governor Joseph Jackson Gravely served one full term and part of a second term, from January 4, 1871, thru April 28, 1872, the day of his death. Joseph Jackson Gravely died in Stockton, Cedar County, Missouri, at the peak of his career. He was 43 years of age and is interred at Lindley Prairie Cemetery near Bear Creek, Missouri.

SOURCE: The General Assembly of VA, 1619-1978, A Bicentennial Register of Members, VA State Library; compiled by Cynthia Miller Leonard, published for the General Assembly of VA by the VA State Library, Richmond, VA, 1978, p299, 304, 309, 314, 318
Session 06 Dec 1819, thru 25 Feb 1820: House of Delegates, Henry Co VA: Joseph Martin, Benjamin Dyer
Session 04 Dec 1820, thru 05 Mar 1821: House of Delegates, Henry Co VA: Robert Allen, Benjamin Dyer
Session 03 Dec 1821, thru 04 Mar 1822: House of Delegates, Henry Co VA: Robert Allen, Benjamin Dyer
Session 02 Dec 1822, thru 25 Feb 1823: House of Delegates, Henry Co VA: James E. Bouldin, Benjamin Dyer
Session 01 Dec 1823, thru 10 Mar 1824: House of Delegates, Henry Co VA: Joseph S. King*, James E. Bouldin, Benjamin Dyer*
*Benjamin Dyer died before the session began and was succeeded by Joseph S. King.

SOURCE: The General Assembly of VA, 1619-1978, A Bicentennial Register of Members, VA State Library; compiled by Cynthia Miller Leonard, published for the General Assembly of VA by the VA State Library, Richmond, VA, 1978, p339, 344, 356, 368
Session Dec 3, 1827, thru Mar 1, 1828: House of Delegates: Peyton Gravely, David Dalton Dyer
Session Dec 1, 1828, thru Feb 17, 1829: House of Delegates: Peyton Gravely, David Dalton Dyer
Session Dec 6, 1830, thru Apr 19, 1831: House of Delegates: Peyton Gravely, David Dalton Dyer
Session Dec 2, 1833, thru Mar 14, 1834: House of Delegates: Peyton Gravely, David Dalton Dyer


GRAVELY, Joseph Jackson, a Representative from Missouri; born near Leatherwood, Henry County, Va., September 25, 1828; attended the public schools; engaged in agricultural pursuits and taught school; studied law; was admitted to the bar and practiced; member of the State house of representatives in 1853 and 1854; moved to Missouri in 1854; delegate to the State constitutional convention in 1860; served in the State senate in 1862 and 1864; during the Civil War served in the Union Army as colonel of the Eighth Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Cavalry; elected as a Republican to the Fortieth Congress (March 4, 1867-March 3, 1869); Lieutenant Governor of Missouri in 1871 and 1872; died in Stockton, Cedar County, Mo., April 28, 1872; interment in Lindley Prairie Cemetery, near Bear Creek, Mo.



SOURCE: http://bioguide.congress.gov/
GRAVELY, JOSEPH JACKSON, 1828-1872, a Representative from MO; b near Leatherwood, Henry Co VA, Sep 25, 1828; attended the public schools; engaged in agricultural pursuits and taught school; studied law; was admitted to the bar and practiced; member of the State house of representatives in 1853 and 1854; moved to MO in 1854; c a delegate to the Missouri Constitutional Convention in 1860. During the Civil War, Gravely served as colonel of the 8th Missouri State Militia Cavalry Regiment in the Union Army and was a member of the Missouri Senate in 1862 and 1864.
y; elected as a Republican to the Fortieth Congress (Mar 4, 1867-Mar 3, 1869); Lieutenant Governor of MO in 1871 and 1872; d in Stockton, Cedar Co MO, Apr 28, 1872; interment in Lindley Prairie Cemetery, near Bear Creek, MO.

SOURCE: Find A Grave
US Congressman. Elected to represent Missouri's 4th District in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1867 to 1869. Also served as a Member of the Missouri State Legislature, Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention from Missouri in 1868, and Lieutenant Governor of Missouri. (bio by: K)

SOURCE: Bruce Locke, rootsweb post of 20 Sep 1998
The Henry Bulletin, Vol 28, No 9, Aug 13, 1915, p1 [Edited].
Woodstock, VA, Aug 10. Capt Peyton B. GRAVELY d here Sat. Came to Woodstock 5 yrs ago from Danville. Oldest son of Willis GRAVELY Sr, b Henry Co, Jul 15, 1835. His father d Aug 1886, age 86, and his mother who was Miss Anna M. BARROW, d Dec 1886. Capt GRAVELY m. 24 Oct 1871, Martinsville, to Miss Mary F. WALTERS, formerly of Pittsylvania Co. Survivors: Wife & 5 children: Mrs. Kate W. CABELL of NY, Peyton B. GRAVELY Jr, James G. GRAVELY of Woodstock, Mrs. Nannie TURPIN & Mrs. Mary V. CLAPP.

SOURCE: Lib of VA
BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
Peyton B. Gravely was born in Henry County, Virginia, in 1935 [sic 1835]. In 1860, he was living with his parents and at least 8 siblings, including Marshall F. Gravely enlisted in April 1861 and served through the end of the war with Price's Company, Virginia Light Artillery (Danville Artillery) and the 42nd Regiment, Virginia Infantry. He was promoted five times, the last leading to his being a captain of Company F from January 1863. Gravely was wounded three times at the battles of Gettysburg, Wilderness, and Fisher's Hill.
By 1880, he was a tobacco manufacturer in Danville. He was married to Mary Walter and had at least five children: Kate W., Peyton, James G., Mary, and Nannie Daisy. Gravely died in Virginia in 1928.

Sources:
http://genforum.genealogy.com/walters/messages/4724.html
See 42nd Virginia Infantry by John Chapla for notes on Peyton B. Gravely's service.
SCOPE AND CONTENT
The collection includes a single letter from Peyton B. Gravely to one of his sisters (she is not identified) in 1863. The first part of the letter is devoted to a vehement attack on the Reynolds family. The letter suggests the family instigated a rumor about Gravely (the nature of which is never shared). In addition to a brief paragraph on news about family and friends, Gravely also writes about a recent review of General Ewell's troops by Jefferson Davis, in which he intends to wear the Yankee sword he captured at Chancellorsville.

Birth: May 15, 1835
Leatherwood
Henry County
Virginia, USA
Death: Aug. 8, 1915

Wikipedia:
Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 – December 13, 1885) was an American politician. He was a Senator, the 20th Governor of Missouri, and the Liberal Republican andDemocratic Party Vice presidential candidate in the presidential election of 1872.


Added by Rebecca Reuben Dyer on Jul 20, 2016 7:54 AM
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