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Uley T. Washburn, Jr. (#46888152)
 member for 7 years, 7 months, 4 days
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Bio Photo Uley Thomas Washburn Jr. died in his sleep on August 20, 2012. Thank you.

The following was written by Uley:

"I have been "hobbying" off and on in genealogy since 1977, and really enjoy walking through cemeteries, searching libraries, the internet, and books to collect historical information. I try very hard to post information here, and other websites to make history as free as possible to all. I actually started to research the Civil War veterans because of my great-great-grandfather. My Dad was 8 when August Adler died, and still recalls him speaking of being a "drummer" in the Civil War. Well, one thing led to another, and here I am. And so glad I found this site.

My wife, Victoria, posted several for me before setting up her own account. She is originally from Jamestown, Tennessee.

If anyone has anything to share on "find-a-grave", please feel free to e-mail me at: CWSG_2007@yahoo.com, and I will post it asap. I would greatly appreciate any further info anyone may have on "my" veterans also. Plus, feel free to e-mail and ask if I have further on your relative. I have several books and sources which may help.

Thanks, in advance,
Uley
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 Website: http://www.freewebs.com/5...
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 • 506 Memorials Managed
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Uley's Cemetery (15)
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Bev, Vicki Roberts
Messages left for Uley T. Washbur... (25)[Leave Message]
Twig Of The Tree
KINCHELOE TRANSFER
If they not a close relatives to you, could you please transfer
Charles I Kincheloe # 28723598
and
Rebekah Kincheloe #28723420
to me. Charles is my 3rd great grandfather, and Rebekah is my 3rd great aunt.

Twig
Twig Of The Tree
# 48280310
Added by Twig Of The Tree on Jul 21, 2014 9:10 PM
Steve Dahl
Pvt Louis Smith
I visited Frankilton Cemetery in Henry Co Kentucky today researching my wife's great grandfather's family (Roberts). While I was there and took some shots to post on findagrave.com. I took one of Pvt Smith and saw the info you posted on him regarding the "Orphan Brigade." My wifes maternal great grandfather was also in the Orphan Brigade. Here is a blurb...thanks for the info!

Notes from the Orphan Brigade web site www.rootsweb.com/~orphanhm/index.html
THOMPSON, Alexander A. Born in West Point, Hardin Co., ca. 1845; family of William "Curly Bill" and Louisia Thompson (family from Taylor Co.). Enlisted 18 August 1861 at Camp Burnett, age 19. Fought at Shiloh (where he was wounded, 6 April 1862), Murfreesboro (where he was again wounded, in the knee), Rocky Face Ridge, and Resaca (where he was wounded in the ankle, 15 May 1864). Detached for service in the pioneer corps, July-August 1863. Absent wounded at Montgomery, AL, May-August 1864 and at Macon, GA, September-November 1864 and January 1865. Returned to duty, 13 February 1865, and took part in the subsequent engagements of the mounted campaign. Died 21 July 1930 of uremic poisoning; buried in the Perkins Cemetery, near Bloyd's Crossing, Green Co. Kentucky Confederate pension file number 1958.
Added by Steve Dahl on Dec 29, 2011 4:32 PM
dviehman
Samuel Burk
Would you consider transferring Samuel Burk's memorial page 18770743 to me? He was my 4th great grandfather. Thank you.

Donna Palmer Viehman
Added by dviehman on Nov 26, 2011 7:41 PM
Garland Hill
Grave Help

Thank you fore the Grave Stones

Added by Garland Hill on Sep 11, 2011 7:46 AM
J. Moore
William Dean
Thank you, Uley!

Need a lookup on Ancestry.com?

~ Jesse Moore
Added by J. Moore on Aug 29, 2011 7:10 PM
Gaye Hill
Elijah BASYE Cave Hill Cemetery
Hello Uley,

I am in the process of entering this family into Find A Grave.

This is Elijah BASYE Find A Grave Memorial# 74245476.

Gaye Hill
Added by Gaye Hill on Aug 01, 2011 7:33 AM
Alice P.
Pioneer Cemetery, Spencer Co., KY
I noticed you had taken a picture of the Pioneer Cemetery in Spencer Co., Kentucky. There are only two people listed in this cemetery but in your picture I see lots of tombstones. Is this cemetery the same cemetery as Old Taylorsville Cemetery or are they two separate cemeteries? I am trying to locate a Joseph Eggen, died Dec 3, 1896 and Elizabeth Taylor Eggen who died June 28, 1857. Joseph's obit said he was buried in the old cemetery next to his wife but I am not sure where that would be. He lived in Taylorsville and his funeral was held in the Presbyterian Church in Taylorsville. Do you have any information that may help me?
Thanks so much,
Alice Price
Added by Alice P. on Jul 26, 2011 6:38 PM
Gaye Hill
Elijah Bayse
Find A Grave Memorial# 10176544

There are many BAYSE in Cave Hill, but their names are mispelled in the records. I will try to find my notes for you.

Gaye Hill
Added by Gaye Hill on Jul 14, 2011 4:43 PM
Gaye Hill
UPDATE on memorial
SIMPSONVILLE, Ky. (AP) When Mary L. Bailey's grandmother would take her to a Simpsonville cemetery to decorate their relatives' graves, the older woman would point out where a group of African-American soldiers in the Civil War were buried after being killed in a Confederate ambush.

On Sunday, Bailey, 80, returned to the site for a ceremony to dedicate a memorial to those solders, slain months after they turned from slaves into Union soldiers.

"I think it's beautiful," she said afterward. "Because we are honoring something that needed to be done."

The memorial, on U.S. 60 west of Simpsonville, features 22 headstones, a sitting wall and a historical marker.

Area residents like Bailey had long passed down the story of the soldiers who were gunned down by Confederate guerrillas as they herded cattle from Central Kentucky. The soldiers were then buried in a mass grave in what is now the United Brothers of Friendship Cemetery.

But it was only early this year that archaeologists confirmed the probable location of one, and possibly two, mass graves, said Jerry Miller, project manager for the Shelby County Historical Society.

The memorial is alongside U.S. 60, instead of up the hill in the cemetery itself, in part so it can be seen by passing motorists, he said.

Grants from the Louisville Civil War Round Table, Shelby County government, Kentucky African American Heritage Commission, and Kentucky Historical Society helped pay to investigate the solders' likely burial site and build the memorial.

Members of those groups spoke at Sunday's ceremony, and the 12th United States Colored Heavy Artillery re-enactment group and the Boy Scouts also took part.

"It is our belief that this story deserves to be told, and that their sacrifice . should be remembered," said Art Boerner, president of the Louisville Civil War Round Table. "We are standing on hallowed ground."

The slain soldiers were members of the Fifth U.S. Colored Cavalry, formed after President Abraham Lincoln issued an order in 1864 allowing enlistment of slaves in border states.

John Graham of the Shelby County Historical Society read from battlefield reports and newspaper articles about the exploits of the black soldiers, as well as an account of the Simpsonville killings that blamed the soldiers' white commanders for not being present.

During an October 1864 attack by 400 black soldiers on a salt works in western Virginia, "the Negroes rushed upon the works with a yell, killing and wounding a large number of the enemy," Graham read from a commanding officer's report.

"The men could not have behaved more bravely," the officer wrote. "I have seen white troops fight in 27 battles, and I have never seen any fight better."

"Kentucky sent 24,000 African Americans to fight in the Civil War. Only Louisiana sent more," said J. Blaine Hudson, chairman of the Kentucky African American Heritage Commission and arts and sciences dean at the University of Louisville.

He said some were present at Appomattox, when General Robert E. Lee surrendered to the Union's Ulysses S. Grant.

"We do stand in the midst of a piece of Kentucky's history," Hudson said.

2011 Evansville Courier & Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Added by Gaye Hill on Jul 14, 2011 4:37 PM
babs
Bayse
According to Cave Hill's database, Elijah Bayse is not buried there. The only Bayse is a Myrtle Bayse.
Added by babs on Jan 28, 2011 9:03 AM
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