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centavo (#47155688)
 member for 5 years, 7 months, 13 days
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I've been an amateur genealogist for almost 40 years and I'm still continually amazed by the openhandedness I encounter among my fellow researchers - genealogists have to be the most generous bunch of people in the world.

Find A Grave is a wonderful resource, I've found a good many of my ancestors here and want to try and do my part to contribute at least grave marker information. I'll have to request photos of the graves themselves since I'm a couple thousand miles from where my ancestors lived and died.
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Messages left for centavo (29)[Leave Message]
John Mallory Land
STATHAM family
I forgot to mention that I'm glad to hear you are working on a history of the STATHAM family. I am not a direct STATHAM descendant, but my people on my maternal grandfather's side have several connections with the STATHAMS, and they are also among the families who were at Clapp's Factory, which I have researched extensively. I would be interested in seeing any information you may compile, and I'll be glad to share what I have. Thanks - John
Added by John Mallory Land on Jan 05, 2015 3:20 PM
John Mallory Land
Memorial #71154465
Hi - thank you for your message about the GOINS marriage to Mrs. Sarah Tommie (COURSON) DIFFLEY. Of course, you're correct, Drury Sr. died in 1876 and could not have remarried in 1891 - but Drury Jr. died in 1884. This is actually a second marriage for Drury Sr.'s son Levi Jones GOINS, Mem. #26633359, after his first wife Mary Ann (REFRO) GOINS died in 1890. I have created a memorial for Sarah (#140930337) and am posting some additional information about the DIFFLEY family. Thanks again for catching my error and alerting me to it. - John
Added by John Mallory Land on Jan 05, 2015 5:24 AM
John Mallory Land
Robert P. STATHAM
Thanks for your message. The short answer is that I think his first wife is Annie Susie ESTES and appears in her death notice as Susie STATHAM, and then he married Sarah LEWIS. That would mean it is a coincidence that an R. P. STATHAM married a Susie OWENS in Troup County, Georgia. I am running late for work but will look at this in more detail when I get home and make the necessary corrections. I appreciate your alerting me to this discrepancy.
Added by John Mallory Land on Nov 29, 2014 4:51 AM
John Mallory Land
Memorial #82409429
Thank you for the information about Pleasant Joseph STATHAM's WWI draft registration record. - John
Added by John Mallory Land on Nov 24, 2014 10:55 AM
Betty Statom
RE: William G. Statham
Thank you so much. I went to check and I had entered the wrong month. I correct it. Betty
Added by Betty Statom on Nov 04, 2014 7:16 PM
yorkies1
Lets hope the old man didnít die in the poor house

We Have a Little Downton Abbey Action goin on

WEDDING OF MISS WELD.

A recent London bride of Brooklyn note and especial interest socially has been Miss Gladys H. Weld, daughter of Mrs. George F. Clement, formerly of this borough, and a sister of Mrs. Walter T. Post, of 359 Grand avenue; Mrs. Georgia Osborn, of 207 Prospect place, and Mrs. John Victor Doniphan, Jr., of Manhattan. Miss Weld was married to Clarence E. Harrison, son of Sir Frederick Harrison, of Stanmore, England, in St. Barnabas Church, Addison road, Kensington, West London, on January 9. A large number of New York and London people, friends of both families, witnessed it, and the bridal proved an attractive one.

Miss Weld was gowned in white satin trimmed with old point lace and her shower bouquet consisted of gardenias, star jessamines and phantom ferns. She was attended by her niece, Miss Katherine Twyford of London, as maid of honor, while Mr. Harrison's best man was his brother, Harry Harrison. A reception followed the ceremony at the residence of the bride's sister, Mrs. Harry B. Twyford, at 34 Addison road, Kensington West. Among the guests were Sir Frederick and Lady Harrison, Miss Harrison, Miss Alice Harrison, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Turnbull, Mr. and Mrs. Rea, Mr. and Mrs. William Lee Cooper, Mrs. George J. Clement, mother of the bride, and a large contingent of the American colony living in London.

The bride and bridegroom left almost immediately for a picturesque, tour of South Wales, where they will remain for several weeks, returning to London at the expiration of that time to establish their permanent home.

With Miss Gladys Weld, the youngest of the six Weld girls, Manhattan and Brooklyn lose the last of the daughters of a well known family. All are married and three are settled in London. THE BROOKLYN DAILYEAGLE, NEW YORK, SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1907.
Added by yorkies1 on Aug 31, 2014 6:24 PM
yorkies1
RE: tidbit...Charlotte writes: Miss Annie Statum, from Georgia. She is highly educated, but...
she married the Lawyer

Mrs. Weld's Suit Dismissed

The suit of Mrs. Anna Weld against her husband, Leon C. Weld, of 64 Sands street, for abandonment which was began last week and which promised sensational developments was dismissed yesterday afternoon by Justice Walsh, on the ground that Mrs. Weld, being now a resident of New York, was in no danger of becoming a burden on Kings County. When the parties appeared in court yesterday afternoon Counselor Quintard had a list of sensational questions which had been prepared by Mrs. Weld for the lawyer to put to her husband when on the stand. The questions charged him with various outrageous and heartless actions. THE STANDARD-UNION, Gives all the News of the Day in Bright, Crisp, Compete Form, Without Sensationalism, VOL XXVII. NO. 79, BROOKLYN, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1890.

FLOWERS IN PLACE OF MONEY.
MRS. WELD'S COMPLAINT AGAINST HER HUSBAND HEARD IN COURT.

Leon C. Weld is on trial In the Adams Street Police Court, Brooklyn, on a charge of abandonment preferred by his wife Hannah, who lives at No. 156 West 136th street, this city. He is an insurance agent, and lives at No. 64 Sands street, Brooklyn. They have eight children. Three years ago, he says, his wife ejected him from the house and has since refused to live with him.

After their separation she started a boarding house at No. 145 Montague street, on money advanced, as she says, by Governor Alger, of Michigan. A year subsequently she came to New York to keep house for a man named Clement, who had boarded with her in Brooklyn.

She claims that all her husband has given her since they parted was a basket of flowers on her birthday. The flowers were accompanied by some sentimental verses. She declined the gift, as her children were without shoes. She admitted that she had never asked her husband for help. The children appear to sympathize with their mother. Decision in the case will be handed down next week. THE NEW YORK HERALD, FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 1890.-TRIPLE SHEET.



1880 United States Federal Census
about George Clement
Name:
George Clement
Age:
30
Birth Year:
abt 1850
Birthplace:
New York
Home in 1880:
Brooklyn, Kings, New York
Race:
White
Gender:
Male
Marital Status:
Married
Father's Birthplace:
New York
Mother's Birthplace:
New York
Neighbors:
View others on page
Occupation:
Lawyer



1900 United States Federal Census
about Anna M Clement

Name:
Anna M Clement
Age:
51
Birth Date:
Mar 1849

Birthplace:
Georgia
Home in 1900:
Manhattan, New York, New York
Race:
White

Gender:
Female
Relation to Head of House:
Wife
Marital Status:
Married
Spouse's Name:
George J Clement
Marriage Year:
1890
Years Married:
10
Father's Birthplace:
Virginia
Mother's Birthplace:
Georgia
Mother: number of living children:
8
Mother: How many children:
8
Occupation:
View on Image

Neighbors:
View others on page
Household Members:
Name
Age
George J Clement 49
Anna M Clement 51
Eleanor C Weld 23
Lillian F Weld 21
Gladys H Weld 23
Added by yorkies1 on Aug 31, 2014 5:31 PM
yorkies1
RE: tidbit...Charlotte writes: Miss Annie Statum, from Georgia. She is highly educated, but...
Trouble in Paradise

Mrs. Weld's Suit Dismissed
The suit of Mrs. Anna Weld against her husband, Leon C. Weld, of 64 Sands street, for abandonment which was began last week and which promised sensational developments was dismissed yesterday afternoon by Justice Walsh, on the ground that Mrs. Weld, being now a resident of New York, was in no danger of becoming a burden on Kings County. When the parties appeared in court yesterday afternoon Counselor Quintard had a list of sensational questions which had been prepared by Mrs. Weld for the lawyer to put to her husband when on the stand. The questions charged him with various outrageous and heartless actions. THE STANDARD-UNION, Gives all the News of the Day in Bright, Crisp, Compete Form, Without Sensationalism, VOK XXVII. NO. 79, BROOKLYN, THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1890.
Added by yorkies1 on Aug 31, 2014 3:28 PM
yorkies1
RE: tidbit...Charlotte writes: Miss Annie Statum, from Georgia. She is highly educated, but...
the dude in the poor house I think is a M.D.....odd.....
Added by yorkies1 on Aug 31, 2014 2:52 PM
yorkies1
tidbit...Charlotte writes: Miss Annie Statum, from Georgia. She is highly educated, but...
Now comes my last own brother, Harvey Stone Weld. In 1829, with the assistance of friends, he commenced business in New York, and followed it attentively for fourteen years, when he came to the conclusion that his profits were not sufficient for a family's support, and he sold out and moved to Ohio. While living in New York he married Miss Elizabeth Greenleaf of that city. They lived for each other's welfare, and both being prudent they were nicely prospering at the time of her death, which was fourteen years ago. He attempted to follow the same business in Ohio that he had done in New York. Unfortunately, he settled in a village (Richfield) which new railroads leading to and ending at Cleveland, and other thriving places, shortly stopped the growth and business of, and he retraced his steps to New York, and in 1854 he accepted the position, through a friend, of sexton and collector of Henry Ward Beecher's church, at a salary of $750 per year. For two years he filled this position, when, in 1856, he was elected Secretary of the Board of Trustees of said church, still continuing collector of its revenues, which he holds to this clay, April 24th, 1875. During the Treasurer's absence one summer in Europe, he was made Treasurer pro tem, till his return. All this time he has held the office of chief sexton and general superintendent of the temporal affairs of the church, with an assistant to do the sexton work. His salary, as I said before, commenced at $750, and gradually increased with the duties and responsibilities of his position, until it reached the sum of three thousand five hundred per year. Names of their children: Mary Elizabeth Weld, - - - Born July, 1833; died 1838. She was a beautiful child, but was permitted to cheer her friends but a few short years. The little darling died at the early age of four years. Leonard Chamberlain Weld, - - - Born Aug., 1836. Elizabeth Greenleaf Weld, - - - Born Dec, 1839. She is not married, but would make a tidy, prudent housekeeper, and whoever gets her will find it true. She is a kind niece to me. Leonard C. Weld is a brilliant, fine-appearing man. He married Miss Annie Statum, from Georgia. She is highly educated, but, like most Southern ladies, is not familiar with domestic affairs, and is more fit for the parlor than for the numerous cares of a family. Names of their children: Georgia Ellerby Weld, - - - Born Oct. 15th, 1863. Grace Elizabeth Weld, - - - Born Feb. 17th, 1867. Ella Campbell Weld, - Born Jan. 2d, 1869. Lucy Mabel Weld, - Born April 5th, 1871. Leonard Howard Weld, - - - Born May 7th, 1873. Harvey Stone Weld, - - - - Born Oct. 18th, 1874. And another young daughter; I do not know the name. Harvey S. Weld, Jr., died at the tender age of six months. It is hard for parents to part with the little creatures, but they surely go to a better home than any earthly parent can provide. I will not omit speaking of my brother's loneliness after the death of his wife. He was a sincere mourner, and passed two years very lonely. Himself, daughter and servant constituted the family during the time. His son and family, then living on Long Island, were not company for him, and he thought his feelings would never be changed, but, as I said before, time covers the grave of a friend with verdure, and it also soothes the heart of a mourner, and thus it proved in his case. He formed an alliance with Mrs. Mary Ann Rogers, a highly respectable lady in Danbury, Conn. She is an honor to all her friends, and I am proud to call her sister. HlSTORY OF THE WELD FAMILY FROM 1632 TO 1878, WRITTEN BY Mrs. Charlotte Weld Fowler, AT THE ADVANCED AGE OF 86. MIDDLETOWN, CONN., Palton & King, St am Printers and Book-Binders, 1879.
Added by yorkies1 on Aug 31, 2014 8:57 AM
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