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Scott Maxwell (#43707576)
 member for 15 years, 6 months, 21 days
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I live in NW Chicago suburb.

"Damppa" of Jack, Laney, Leah and Joshua.

I have entered relatives, all Chicago Mayors, all Illinois Governors, and all of "haunted" White Cemetery.

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Roy Fredrick
6626269
BIO: Nick Name "Private Joe"
6626269 JOSEPH WILSON FIFER. This distinguished gentleman was 4e elected Governor of Illinois November 6, 1888. He was popularly known during the campaign as "Private Joe." He had served with great devotion to his country during the Rebellion, in the Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. A native of Virginia, he was born in 1840. His parents, John and Mary (Daniels) Fifer, were American born, though of German descent. His father was a brick and stone mason, and an old Henry Clay Whig in politics. John and Mary Fifer had nine children, of whom Joseph was the sixth, and naturally with so large a family it was all the father could do to keep the wolf front the door; to say nothing of giving his children anything like good educational advantages.
Young Joseph attended school some in Virginia, but it was not a good school, and when his father removed to the West. in 1857, Joseph had not advanced much further titan the "First Reader."
Our subject was sixteen then and suffered a great misfortune in the loss of his mother. After the death of Mrs. Fifer, which occurred in Missouri, the family returned to Virginia, but remained only a short time, as during the same year Mr. Fifer came to Illinois. lie settled in McLean County and started a brickyard. Here Joseph and his brothers were put to work. The elder Fifer soon bought a farm near Bloomington and began life as an agriculturist. Here Joe worked and at-tended the neighboring school. He alternated farm-Work, brick-laying, and going to the district school for the succeeding, few years. It was all work and no play for Joe, yet. it by no means made a dull boy of him. All the time he was thinking of the great world outside. of which he had caught a glimpse when coming from Virginia, yet lie did not know just how he was going to get out into it. He could not feel that the woods around the new farm and the log cabin in which the family lived were to 110111 him. The opportunity to get out into the world was soon offered to young Joe. He traveled a dozen miles barefoot in company with his brother George, and enlisted in Company C. 33d Illinois Infantry; he being then twenty years old. In a few days
the regiment was sent to Camp Butler, and then over into Missouri, and saw some vigorous service there. After a second time helping to chase Price out of Missouri. the 33d Regiment went down to Milliken's Bend, and for several weeks "Private Joe" worked on Grant's famous ditch. The regiment then joined the forces operating against Fort Gibson and Vicksburg. Joe was on guard duty in the front ditches when the flag of surrender was run up on the 4th of July, and stuck the bayonet of his gun into the embankment and went into the city with the vanguard of Union soldiers.
The next day, July 5, the 33d joined the force after Johnston, who had been threatening Grant's rear;' and; finally an assault was made on him at Jackson, Miss. In this charge "Private Joe" fell. terribly wounded. He was loading his gun when a Minnie-ball struck him and passed entirely through his body. He was regarded as mortally wounded. His brother, George, who had been made a Lieutenant, proved to be the means of saving his life. The Surgeon told him unless he had ice his brother Joe could not live. It was fifty miles to the nearest point where ice could be obtained. and the roads were rough. A comrade, a McLean county man, who had been wounded, offered to make the trip. An ambulance was secured and the brother soldier started on the journey. lie returned with the ice, but the trip, owing to the roughness of the roads. was very hard on him. After a few months' careful nursing Mr. Fifer was able to come home. The 33d came home on a furlough, and when the boys were ready to return to the tented field. young Fifer was ready to go with them; for he was determined to finish his term of three years. He was mustered out in October, 1864, having been in the service three years and two months.
Private Joe" came out of the army a tall, tanned, and awkward young man of twenty-four. About all he possessed was ambition to be somebody—and pluck. Though at an age when most men have finished their college course, the young soldier saw that if lie was to be anybody he must have an education. Vet lie had no means to enable him to enter school as most young men do. He was determined to have an education. however, and that to him meant success. For the following four years he struggled with his books. He entered Wesleyan University Jan. 1. 1865. He was not a brilliant student, being neither at the head nor the foot of his class. He was in great earnest. however. studied hard and came forth with a well-stored and disciplined mind.
Immediately after being graduated he entered an office at Bloomington as a law student. He had already read law some, and as he continued to work hard, with the spur of poverty and prompting of ambition ever with him, he was ready to hang out his professional shingle in 1869. Being trustworthy he soon gathered about him some influential friends. In 1871 he was elected Corporation Counsel of Bloomington. In 1872 he was elected State's Attorney of McLean County. This office he held for eight years, when he took his seat in the State Senate. Here he served for four years. His ability to perform abundance of hard work made him a most valued member of the Legislature.
Mr. Fifer was married in 1870 to Gertie, daughter of William Lewis. of Bloomington. Mr. Fifer is six feet in height and is spare. weighing only 150 pounds. He has a swarthy complexion, keen black eyes. quick movement, and possesses a frank and sympathetic nature, and naturally makes friends wherever he goes. During the late Gubernatorial campaign his visits throughout the State proved a great power in his behalf. Ills happy faculty of winning the confidence and good wishes of those with whom he comes in personal contact is a source of great popularity. especially during a political battle. As a speaker he is fluent, his language is good. voice clear and agreeable, and manner forcible. His manifest earnestness in what he says as well as his tact as a public speaker, and his fluent and forceful language, makes him a most valuable campaign orator and a powerful pleader at the bar. At the Republican State Convention. held in May. 1888, Mr. Fifer was chosen as its candidate for Governor. He proved a popular nominee. and the name of "Private Joe" became familiar to everyone throughout the State. He waged a vigorous campaign, was elected by a good majority, and in due time assumed the duties of the Chief Executive of Illinois.[Portrait and Biographical Album of Pike and Calhoun Counties, Illinois]
Added by Roy Fredrick on Jan 08, 2016 3:09 PM
Roy Fredrick
6626269
BIO: Nick Name "Private Joe"
6626269 JOSEPH WILSON FIFER. This distinguished gentleman was 4e elected Governor of Illinois November 6, 1888. He was popularly known during the campaign as "Private Joe." He had served with great devotion to his country during the Rebellion, in the Thirty-third Illinois Infantry. A native of Virginia, he was born in 1840. His parents, John and Mary (Daniels) Fifer, were American born, though of German descent. His father was a brick and stone mason, and an old Henry Clay Whig in politics. John and Mary Fifer had nine children, of whom Joseph was the sixth, and naturally with so large a family it was all the father could do to keep the wolf front the door; to say nothing of giving his children anything like good educational advantages.
Young Joseph attended school some in Virginia, but it was not a good school, and when his father removed to the West. in 1857, Joseph had not advanced much further titan the "First Reader."
Our subject was sixteen then and suffered a great misfortune in the loss of his mother. After the death of Mrs. Fifer, which occurred in Missouri, the family returned to Virginia, but remained only a short time, as during the same year Mr. Fifer came to Illinois. lie settled in McLean County and started a brickyard. Here Joseph and his brothers were put to work. The elder Fifer soon bought a farm near Bloomington and began life as an agriculturist. Here Joe worked and at-tended the neighboring school. He alternated farm-Work, brick-laying, and going to the district school for the succeeding, few years. It was all work and no play for Joe, yet. it by no means made a dull boy of him. All the time he was thinking of the great world outside. of which he had caught a glimpse when coming from Virginia, yet lie did not know just how he was going to get out into it. He could not feel that the woods around the new farm and the log cabin in which the family lived were to 110111 him. The opportunity to get out into the world was soon offered to young Joe. He traveled a dozen miles barefoot in company with his brother George, and enlisted in Company C. 33d Illinois Infantry; he being then twenty years old. In a few days
the regiment was sent to Camp Butler, and then over into Missouri, and saw some vigorous service there. After a second time helping to chase Price out of Missouri. the 33d Regiment went down to Milliken's Bend, and for several weeks "Private Joe" worked on Grant's famous ditch. The regiment then joined the forces operating against Fort Gibson and Vicksburg. Joe was on guard duty in the front ditches when the flag of surrender was run up on the 4th of July, and stuck the bayonet of his gun into the embankment and went into the city with the vanguard of Union soldiers.
The next day, July 5, the 33d joined the force after Johnston, who had been threatening Grant's rear;' and; finally an assault was made on him at Jackson, Miss. In this charge "Private Joe" fell. terribly wounded. He was loading his gun when a Minnie-ball struck him and passed entirely through his body. He was regarded as mortally wounded. His brother, George, who had been made a Lieutenant, proved to be the means of saving his life. The Surgeon told him unless he had ice his brother Joe could not live. It was fifty miles to the nearest point where ice could be obtained. and the roads were rough. A comrade, a McLean county man, who had been wounded, offered to make the trip. An ambulance was secured and the brother soldier started on the journey. lie returned with the ice, but the trip, owing to the roughness of the roads. was very hard on him. After a few months' careful nursing Mr. Fifer was able to come home. The 33d came home on a furlough, and when the boys were ready to return to the tented field. young Fifer was ready to go with them; for he was determined to finish his term of three years. He was mustered out in October, 1864, having been in the service three years and two months.
Private Joe" came out of the army a tall, tanned, and awkward young man of twenty-four. About all he possessed was ambition to be somebody—and pluck. Though at an age when most men have finished their college course, the young soldier saw that if lie was to be anybody he must have an education. Vet lie had no means to enable him to enter school as most young men do. He was determined to have an education. however, and that to him meant success. For the following four years he struggled with his books. He entered Wesleyan University Jan. 1. 1865. He was not a brilliant student, being neither at the head nor the foot of his class. He was in great earnest. however. studied hard and came forth with a well-stored and disciplined mind.
Immediately after being graduated he entered an office at Bloomington as a law student. He had already read law some, and as he continued to work hard, with the spur of poverty and prompting of ambition ever with him, he was ready to hang out his professional shingle in 1869. Being trustworthy he soon gathered about him some influential friends. In 1871 he was elected Corporation Counsel of Bloomington. In 1872 he was elected State's Attorney of McLean County. This office he held for eight years, when he took his seat in the State Senate. Here he served for four years. His ability to perform abundance of hard work made him a most valued member of the Legislature.
Mr. Fifer was married in 1870 to Gertie, daughter of William Lewis. of Bloomington. Mr. Fifer is six feet in height and is spare. weighing only 150 pounds. He has a swarthy complexion, keen black eyes. quick movement, and possesses a frank and sympathetic nature, and naturally makes friends wherever he goes. During the late Gubernatorial campaign his visits throughout the State proved a great power in his behalf. Ills happy faculty of winning the confidence and good wishes of those with whom he comes in personal contact is a source of great popularity. especially during a political battle. As a speaker he is fluent, his language is good. voice clear and agreeable, and manner forcible. His manifest earnestness in what he says as well as his tact as a public speaker, and his fluent and forceful language, makes him a most valuable campaign orator and a powerful pleader at the bar. At the Republican State Convention. held in May. 1888, Mr. Fifer was chosen as its candidate for Governor. He proved a popular nominee. and the name of "Private Joe" became familiar to everyone throughout the State. He waged a vigorous campaign, was elected by a good majority, and in due time assumed the duties of the Chief Executive of Illinois.[Portrait and Biographical of Pike and Calhoun Counties, Illinois]



Added by Roy Fredrick on Jan 08, 2016 3:05 PM
Roy Fredrick
6624148
JOEL A. MATTESON, Governor 1853-6, was born Aug. 8, 1808, in Jefferson County, New York, to which place his father had removed from Vermont three years before. His father was a farmer in fair circumstances, but a common English education was all that his only son received. Young Joel first tempted fortune as a small tradesman in Prescott, Canada, before he was of age. He returned from 'that place to his home, entered an academy, taught school, visited the principal Eastern cities, improved a farm his father had given him, made a tour in the South, worked there in building railroads, experienced a storm on the Gulf of Mexico, visited the gold diggings of Northern Georgia, and returned via Nashville to St. Louis and through Illinois to his father's home, when hemarried. In 1833, having sold his farm, he removed. with his wife and one child, to Illinois, and entered a claim on Government land near the head of Au Sable River, in what is now Kendall County. At that time there were not more than two neighbors within a range of ten miles of his place, and only three or four houses between him and Chicago. He opened a large farm. His family was boardcd 12 miles away while he erected a house on his claim, sleeping, during this time, under a rude pole shed. Here his life was once placed in imminent peril by a huge prairie rattlesnake sharing his bed.
In 1835 he bought largely at the Government land sales. During the speculative real-estate mania which broke out in Chicago in 1836 and spread over the State, he sold his lands under the inflation of that period and removed to Joliet. In 1838 he became a heavy contractor on the Illinois & Michigan Canal. Upon the completion of his job in 1841, when hard times prevailed, business at a stand, contracts paid in State scrip; when all the public works except the canal were abandoned, the State offered for sale loo tons of railroad iron, which was purchased by Mr. Matteson at a bargain. This he accepted, shipped and sold at Detroit. realizing a very handsome profit, enough to pay off all his canal debts and leave him a surplus of several thousand dollars. His enterprise next prompted him to start a woolen mill at Joliet, in which he prospered, and which, after successive enlargements, became an enormous establishment.
In 1842 he was first elected a State Senator, but, by a bungling apportionment, John Pearson, a Senator holding over, was found to be in the same distric:, and decided to be entitled to represent it. Matteson's seat was declared vacant. Pearson, however with a nobleness difficult to appreciate in this day of greed for office, unwilling to represent his district under the circumstances, immediately resigned his unexpired term of two years. A bill was passed in a few hours ordering a new election, and in ten days' time Mr. Matteson was returned re-elected and took his seat as Senator. From his well known capacity as a business man, he was made Chairman of the Committee on Finance, a position he held during this half and two full succeeding Senatorial terms, discharging its important duties with ability and faithfulness. Besides his extensive woolen-mill interest, when work was resumed on the canal under the new loan of $1,600,000 he again became a heavy contractor, and also subsequently operated largely in building railroads. Thus he showed himself a most energetic and thorough business man.
He was nominated for Governor by the Democratic State Convention which met at Springfield April 20, 1852. Other candidates before the Convention were D. L. Gregg and F. C. Sherman, of Cook ; John Dement, of Lee ; Thomas L. Harris, of Menard; Lewis W. Ross, of Fulton; and D. P. Bush, of Pike. Gustavus Koerner, of St. Clair, was nominated for Lieutenant Governor. For the same offices the Whigs nominated Edwin B. Webb and Dexter A. Knowlton. Mr. Matteson received 80,645 votes at the election, while Mr. Webb received 64,408. Matteson's forte was not on the stump; he had not cultivated the art of oily flattery, or the faculty of being all things to all men. His intellectual qualities took rather the direction of efficient executive ability. His turn consisted not so much in the adroit management of party, or the powerful advocacy of great governmental principles, as in those more solid and enduring operations which cause the physical development and advancement of a State, of commerce and business enterprise, into which he labored with success to lead the people. As a politician he was just and liberal in his views, and both in official and private life he then stood untainted and free from blemish. As a man, in active benevolence, social rirtties and all the amiable qualities of neighbor or citizen, he had few superiors. His messages present a perspicuous array of facts as to the condition of the State, and are often couched in forcible and elegant diction.
The greatest excitement during his term of office was the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, by Congress, under the leadership of Stephen A. Douglas in 1854, when the bill was passed organizing the Terri. tory of Kansas and Nebraska. A large portion of the Whig parry of the North, through their bitter opposition to the Democratic party, naturally drifted into the doctrine of anti-slavery, and thus led to what was temporarily called the " Anti-Nebraska " party, while the followers of Douglas were known as " Nebraska or Douglas Democrats." It was during this embryo stage of the Republican party that Abraham Lincoln was brought forward as the "Anti-Nebraska" candidate for the United States Senatorship, while Gen. James Shields, the incumbent, was re-nominated by the Democrats. But after a few ballotings in the Legislature (1855), these men were dropped, and Lyman Trumbull, an Anti-Nebraska Democrat, was brought up by the former, and Mr. Matteson, then Governor, by the latter. On the r rth ballot Mr. Trumbull obtained one majority, and was accordingly declared elected. Before Gov. Matteson's term expired, the Republicans were fully organized as a national party, and in 1856 put into the field a full national and State ticket, carrying the State, but not the nation.
The Legislature of 1855 passed two very important measures, the present free-school system and a submission of the Maine liquor law to a vote of the people. The latter was defeated by a small majority of the popular vote.
During the four years of Gov. Matteson's administration the taxable wealth of the State was about trebled, from $137,818,079 to $349,951,272; the public debt was reduced from $17,398,985 to $12,843,- 144; taxation was at the same time reduced, and the State resumed paying interest on its debt in New York as fast as it fell due; railroads were increased in their mileage from something less than 400 to about 3,000 ; and the population of Chicago was nearly doubled, and its commerce mare than quadrupled.
Before closing this account, we regret that we have to say that Mr. Matteson, in all other respects an upright man and a good Governor, was implicated in a false reissue of redeemed canal scrip, amounting to $224,182.66. By a suit in the Sangamon Circuit Court the State recovered the principal and all the interest excepting $27,500.
He died in the winter of 1872--3, at Chicago. [Source: Portrait and Biographical Album Pike and Calhoun Counties, Illinois]
Added by Roy Fredrick on Jan 02, 2016 10:19 AM
C R Cole
Thomas Wynne
Scott Thomas Wynne was buried at Ducketts farm which was the Quaker burial ground. Philadelphia has a long history of building on cemeteries. Ducketts farm is located at what is today 30th st Station or the Post Office Building.

There are multiple Thomas Wynnes because the cemetery is not defined. GramereC@aol.com Can we add Ducketts Farm Quaker Burial Ground?
Added by C R Cole on Jul 18, 2015 6:24 AM
LoveHistory
White Cemetery
If you are not the creator of the cemetery page, then how can this reselling of grave sites be published on Find A Grave?
Added by LoveHistory on Jan 31, 2014 12:26 PM
LoveHistory
White Cemetery
Are you the creator of the cemetery?
If so, I just found this in Cuba Township's newsletter and you might want to post this.
http://www.cubatownship.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/2012-Fall.pdf

Probably too late for some but, how awful this is reselling grave plots. You can credit me with the discovery, if you wish.

Bonnie Duresa
Added by LoveHistory on Jan 31, 2014 12:24 PM
LoveHistory
White Cemetery
Re Christian (Christopher ) Schumacher died Oct 20, 1927.
Front page news of Barrington Review October 27, 1927,
It states his eldest son William shot him on Oct 20th.
The article goes on & says, William confessed to the shooting, because his father had been abusive for many years toward the entire family. I didn't look further for the obit, maybe you might be interested in posting this information or researching further. It was front page news in 1927. How sad...
Thanks
Bonnie
Added by LoveHistory on Jan 30, 2014 10:26 PM
Dr B
Cary Family
Scott thanks for the Cary transfer. My wife is a descendant of the Cary family.
Added by Dr B on Dec 27, 2013 9:13 AM
ForgetMeNot
transfer
Thank you for the transfer of the Wallace Bruso memorial. I have already made the additions. Have a nice week!
Added by ForgetMeNot on Nov 11, 2013 5:30 PM
Richard O. Rotenberry
RE: Hamrick Familys& Entrekin Familys
OK, thanks. Linda said that you might be related. I am a direct descendant of the Entrekin, Smith, Hamrick, and Rotenberry familys. if you run into any information to share, please do. Sicerely, Richard Rotenberry, Panama City, Fla.
Added by Richard O. Rotenberry on Sep 13, 2013 7:03 AM
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