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Owen Windrow (#47932431)
 member for 2 years, 10 months, 17 days
Gloria Tune
John William Tune
Hi Owen,

Regarding John William Tune, Find A Grave Memorial# 62329736

I was just going through the Tune memorials submitted by another cousin who I have not heard from in quite a while when I noticed your note:
"John William Tune would be my 3rd cousin 2x."

Not sure if you ever made contact with her(Family Chronicles), as her memorial appeared to be a duplicate of the one left by another cousin & is no longer on her list of memorials!!

Anyway, if you needed some info about the family, you can always contact me here.

Gloria J. Tune

Added by Gloria Tune on Sep 11, 2014 12:36 PM

Carol Robertson White
RE: Richard Windrow and Elsie Windrow
Done

Added by Carol Robertson White on Jan 28, 2014 12:48 PM

Carol Robertson White
RE: Richard Windrow and Elsie Windrow
Done

Added by Carol Robertson White on Jan 28, 2014 12:48 PM

Carol Robertson White
RE: Richard Windrow and Elsie Windrow
Done

Added by Carol Robertson White on Jan 28, 2014 12:48 PM

Carol Robertson White
RE: Richard Windrow and Elsie Windrow
Please send me memorial numbers of the ones that you want transferred.

Carol

Added by Carol Robertson White on Jan 27, 2014 10:40 AM

Mark Thilmony
James R Windrow
Your fathers memorial has been transferred to you.

Mark

Added by Mark Thilmony on Jan 26, 2014 2:56 AM

Ann De
Bridget Butler Humphreys
Just discovered this website while looking up John Humphreys online. Margaret Humphreys & Chichester Leech would be 7 generations from me. Chichester Leech's parents were Andrew Leech Born 1760 in Virginia and Elizabeth (no other info). Margaret Humphrey's parents were John Humphreys Born near Dublin, Married in Virginia to Catherine Dickison born near cow pasture river, Bath Co. VA. John Humphreys mother's last name was Butler but we don't have the first names of his parents. My father's records show John Humphrey's mother was the daughter of Sir Toby Butler though. Sir Toby Butler's children appear to be James Butler and Frances Butler but it is not clear if Frances married the father of John Humphreys. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks!

Added by Ann De on Jun 17, 2013 11:15 PM

Linda Doile Morris
KNIGHT FAMILY
Ron, I found you name on the flowers part of Giles Kinght memorial. You state he was your grandfather. Ron, I am a decendent too and I am really interested in finding more than just my line. I have three records of a Giles Knight who was born before 1800 and also attended Byberry MM. But I have no clue who he is. I do hope to hear from you.

Linda Morris

Added by Linda Doile Morris on Jan 08, 2013 4:43 PM

ron
RE: Catherine Dickison Humphreysys
THANK YOU FOR YOUR COMMENTS. I HAVE A COMMENT CONCERNING A "10 YEAR OLD" BEING MARRIED IN THE 1600-1700S. THE INFORMATION I RECEIVED ABOUT THE MARRIAGE DATE FOR CATHERINE CAME FROM 2 HUMPHREY RESEARCHERS WHO CLAIMED TO HAVE THEIR INFORMATION FROM FAMILY MEMBERS--NOT FROM OTHER SOURCES LIKE DOCUMENTS. THESE LADIES WERE MISS BLANCHE HUMPHREYS AND MRS. VIRGINIA HUMPHRIES/YATES. BOTH OF THESE LADIES WERE BORN, RAISED AND SPENT THEIR ENTIRE LIVES IN RONCEVERTE, GREENBRIER CO., VA/WVA. THE FACT OF A MARRIAGE BY A GIRL OF ABOUT 10 OR SO YEARS MAY NOT BE AS FAR FETCHED AS YOU MAKE IT OUT TO BE. I HAVE FOUND A FOLLOWING ARTICLE CONCERNING THE AVERAGE AGE OF MARRIAGES IN 1600-1700 COLONIAL AMERICA,THERE APPEARS TO BE PRACTICAL REASONS FOR THIS NOT BEING A SO FAR OUT POSSIBILITY.

SOURCE: Everyday Life in Colonial America: From 1607-1783, by Dale Taylor
In general in the 1700's and before the average age of marriage was 12.5 for girls and 13.5 for boys. Based on the fact girls generally mature sooner than boys. Also, though the life expectancy had increased in the 1700's it was still around 30 to 40 years. Early marriage was also encouraged because bloodlines were important for potential husbands as there was less chance of the girl being pregnant at the time of marriage. First born male children in a marriage were the primary inheritors of what the husband and father had accumulated. This was very important for land owners and was responsible for sisters marrying brothers or even fathers marring daughters. It was all done to protect the bloodlines for inheritance of wealth.
Arranged marriages were also quite common yet and many children were arranged into marriage from a very young age.



The life expectancy of a colonial was short. As many as 50% of all women died in child birth or from child bed disease. The infant mortality rate was also high. If a child could reach the age of eleven, they stood a better chance at survival. Individuals in their forties and fifties during the 17th century were considered "old." Statistics peering back to the 18th century indicate the average life expectancy was the age of 45!

For families of consequence, marriage was viewed as a business transaction, love not being made a part of the arrangement. Love was saved for affairs outside of the marriage contract. Marriage, on the other hand, was the institution in which legitimate heirs were produced, a title obtained or additional monies and properties achieved. The children of poor families had an easier time selecting a mate. Property and money didn't play as large a role in their decision. Love could be taken into the equation when it came to spouse selection.

The wealthy aristocracy of the Southern colonies arranged marriages of their offspring. A young man simply did not go off on his own and begin a courtship without attending to business first. Restrictions existed on the inheritance a couple received if they married without the permission of their parents.

As such, a young man approached his father first before soliciting his attentions to a local girl. If a young man's father approved of the match, he would write a letter to the girl's father outlining the financial particulars of the match. Upon receipt of a letter from the girl's father approving the match, including his own financial tribute, the couple could commence with their courtship. Courting took place in the typical places: dances, church, and visiting the young girl's home.


A marriage in colonial America could be viewed as an absolute partnership with the man and woman having a specific role to fulfill. A man's sphere of influence was in the area of war, politics, and business. Although women did not have a legal right to property ownership, they could hold influence over the running of the internal affairs of the home. A high stationed, literate wife would be expected to handle basic accounting and management affairs within the household. The overseeing of servants in the higher classes also demanded her time in addition to her other traditional duties including child rearing and sewing. When death took a spouse, little time was put aside for mourning. Within four weeks of a spouse's passing, the surviving spouse might remarry. The challenges of day-to-day living demanded that a partnership always be in place.

I AM FAMILIAR WITH THE ISABELLA AND CHICHESTER LEECH OUTLINE UP TO A POINT. I COMMUNICATED SOME YEARS AGO WITH A SUSAN KATHERINE BREAZEALE B:1947 WHO INDICATED A HUSBAND AS MICHAEL DAVID PARK. I DDN'T FOLLOW UP WITH THIS LINE AND SHE NEVER MENTIONED A 2 VOLUME WORK DONE ON THIS LINE. SO I AM NOT FAMILIAR WITH THAT HISTORY.

Added by ron on Dec 11, 2012 6:02 PM

 
 

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