Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Find all Egans in:
 • Friars Cemetery at Graymoor
 • Garrison
 • Putnam County
 • New York
 • Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Community Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Sponsor This Memorial! Advertisement
Rev Fr Daniel Egan
Learn about sponsoring this memorial...
Birth: Jun. 18, 1915
Bronx
Bronx County
New York, USA
Death: Feb. 10, 2000
Peekskill
Westchester County
New York, USA

Father Daniel Egan, SA


From the Sullivan County Democrat in an issue dated Feb 2000


Fr. Daniel Egan, 84 "Junkie Priest" Author
Fr. Daniel Egan, a Franciscan Friar of the Atonement, d. at Hudson Valley Hospital in Peekskill on Thurs, Feb 10, 2000. He was 84 years of age.
The son of the late Thomas and Mary Egan, he was born June 18, 1915, in the Bronx.
He attended school in the Bronx, entered the Friars of the Atonement in 1935 and professed his first vows in 1937. He received a Bachelor's degree in Philosophy in 1940 from Catholic University in Washington, D.C. and received a Master's degree in Religious Education in 1945.
Ordained to the priesthood in 1945, he spent 15 years in teaching and pastoral work at Graymoor, at Kingston, North Carolina and at Gardiner Mines, Nova Scotia. During that period he became involved in drug rehabilitation, a field he entered full time in 1960 when he became a member of the first White House Conference on Drugs and of the White House Conference on Youth.
Fr. Egan became internationally known for his work in drug prevention and education. His biography, "The Junkie Priest," by John D. Harris, was published in 1970.
He founded Village Haven for drug addicts in Greenwich Village in 1962 and New Hope Manor at Graymoor for drug-addicted teenage girls in 1970. New Hope Manor has grown to include two facilities, one of which is located in Barryville, and is celebrating its thirtieth anniversary in October. Special Services throughout the year will honor the memory of Father Egan.
Fr. Egan is survived by three brothers, John, Philip and Gerard, and a sister, Veronica Egan of East Falmouth, Mass. He was precedeased by three brothers, Fr. Joseph, S.A., Thomas and Raymond, and a sister, Margaret Mary.
Following a Mass of Christian Burial at Graymoor on Monday, interment was made in the Friar's Cemetery..

-----------------------------


"THE JUNKIE PRIEST" Funeral services will be held here at Graymoor for Father Daniel Egan, a Franciscan Friar of the Atonement, who died here today February 10, 2000. He was 84 years old. Fr. Egan was born in the Bronx, NY, on June 18, 1915 and attended elementary and high school in the Bronx. He entered the Friars of the Atonement in 1935 and professed his first vows in 1937. He then studied at Catholic University in Washington, DC, where he received a Bachelors Degree in Philosophy in 1940 and a Masters Degree in Religious Education in 1945. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1945 and for 15 years was engaged in teaching and pastoral work at Graymoor, at Kingston, NC and at Gardiner Mines, Nova Scotia. During that period he became involved in drug rehabilitation programs, a field he entered full time in 1960, when he became a member of the first White House Conference on Drugs and of the White House Conference on Youth. Father Egan became internationally known for his work in drug prevention and education. His biography, "The Junkie Priest", by John D. Harris, was published in 1970. He founded Village Haven for drug addicts, in Greenwich Village, NY, in 1962 and New Hope Manor at Graymoor for drug-addicted teenage girls in 1970. He worked at Saint Joseph's Rehabilitation Center at Saranac Lake, NY as program director in 1978; and in the West Indies from 1978 to 1980 where he was responsible for starting programs and clinics for the sick and poor. Between 1989 and 1990 Father Egan started a house for drug addicts in Calcutta, India at the request of Mother Theresa. In 1990, he returned to Graymoor where he continued working in drug prevention ministries. He received numerous awards and honors including the 1974 International Good Samaritan Award from the Catholic Development Conference, the 1991 Pastoral Ministry Award from Catholic University; the 1986 Aquinas Award from Mount Saint Mary College; awards from the United States Army, Navy, and Marines for pioneering drug programs in the armed forces; and honorary doctorates from Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY, and Dominican College in Sparkill, NY. Father Egan is the son of the late Thomas and Mary Egan. He is survived by three brothers, John, Philip, and Gerard; and a sister, Veronica Egan of East Falmouth, MA. Three other brothers, Father Joseph, SA, Thomas, and Raymond, and a sister, Margaret Mary, are deceased. The visitation will be held at Pilgrim Hall, Graymoor, Monday, February 14, from 2- 7:30 pm. The Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Pilgrim Hall, Graymoor, Monday, February 14, at 7:30 pm. The Very Reverend Arthur Johnson, SA, Minister General of the Friars of the Atonement, will be the principal celebrant, and Father Charles Angell, SA, will be the homilist. Interment will be Tuesday, February 15, 10 am, at the Friars Cemetery. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Dorsey-Carlone Funeral Home, Peekskill, NY. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/lohud/obituary.aspx?n=daniel-egan&pid=148803405#sthash.RFAXQ6LV.dpuf

Published by The Journal News on February 13, 2000

----------------------------------


The Rev. Daniel Egan, whose tireless work in rehabilitating drug addicts brought him the nickname ''the Junkie Priest,'' died on Thursday at a hospital in Peekskill, N.Y. He was 84 and lived at the Graymoor Friary in Garrison, N.Y.
Father Egan's work with addicts began in 1952, when he was preaching in a church in Manhattan and saw a troubled woman. She was addicted to narcotics and in need of help. He telephoned a number of hospitals in the city, he recalled later, but none would take her. ''She was considered a criminal,'' he said.
So Father Egan, a Franciscan Friar of the Atonement, became a certified alcohol- and drug-abuse counselor and a chaplain of Narcotics Anonymous. In 1962, he founded Village Haven, a halfway house for women who were addicted to drugs, in Greenwich Village. Before long, 8 or 10 women a week, most of them newly released from jail, were going to Village Haven for help.
''These women face a crisis the moment they are freed,'' Father Egan said in a 1963 interview. ''The simplest things become their deepest need -- a place to eat and sleep, a job, a coat to wear, a friend.''
His work took him far afield. He established a center for drug addicts a decade ago in Calcutta, at Mother Teresa's request. In an interview last year he recalled, ''She was like all saints -- very stubborn.''
Cardinal John O'Connor praised Father Egan in his homily at a Mass attended by Father Egan last September. At the time, Father Egan was serving in nursing homes for AIDS patients and continuing his work against addiction.
The cardinal said that when Father Egan was referred to as ''the Junkie Priest,'' it was ''with great affection and great admiration.''
When Father Egan was a young priest, the cardinal recalled, ''He used to roam the streets of Times Square, and that area in general, looking for ways of helping prostitutes, so many of them addicts to one form of drug or another. God knows how many lives and souls Father Egan has saved in that terribly difficult kind of work.''
A fellow Franciscan Friar of the Atonement, the Rev. Walter Gagne , said that in the 1950's, when Father Egan was beginning his work with addicts, he would go to the old Women's House of Detention in Greenwich Village. Many of its inmates were addicts who had worked as prostitutes. ''He would stand on the sidewalk by the prison and start talking to the women up in the prison windows,'' said Father Gagne, and pretty soon: ''They'd be yelling at him, and he'd be yelling back at them. He was ministering to them even before they got out of prison.''
Regardless of how he carried out his ministry, Father Egan thought of the afflicted in spiritual terms. ''If we had the vision of faith,'' he once wrote, ''we would see beneath every behavior -- no matter how repulsive -- beneath every bodily appearance -- no matter how dirty or deformed -- a priceless dignity and value that makes all material facts and scientific technologies fade into insignificance.''
In a 1965 interview at St. Patrick's Villa Retreat House in Nanuet, N.Y., where he was ministering to women who had broken their heroin habit, he said the best way of dealing with drug addicts was through personal counseling.
He also suggested that government agencies fighting drug abuse ''save themselves money and trouble'' by setting up storefront offices in high-addiction neighborhoods.
''Besides the human salvation, think of the prison expenses you'd save,'' he said. ''You could pay these girls $5 a day to just sit there and talk to the junkies who wandered in for a cigarette instead of a fix.''
In 1970, he founded New Hope Manor at Graymoor for teenage girls who were addicted to drugs. Over the years, he also worked as program director at St. Joseph's Rehabilitation Center at Saranac Lake, N.Y., and in programs elsewhere.
He received various honors, including awards for pioneering anti-drug programs in the armed forces.
A native New Yorker, he was the son of a police lieutenant, Thomas J. Egan, and the former Mary Bierne. He went to schools in the Bronx, entered the Friars of the Atonement in 1935, professed his first vows in 1937 and received a bachelor's degree in philosophy and a master's degree in religious education, both from Catholic University in Washington.
He is survived by three brothers, John, Philip and Gerard; and a sister, Veronica Egan.
Photo: The Rev. Daniel Egan in 1963. (Associated Press)

-------------------------------------------------


Daniel Egan, 84, Drug Fighter Known as 'Junkie Priest,' Dies
By ERIC PACE
Published: February 13, 2000

The Rev. Daniel Egan, whose tireless work in rehabilitating drug addicts brought him the nickname ''the Junkie Priest,'' died on Thursday at a hospital in Peekskill, N.Y. He was 84 and lived at the Graymoor Friary in Garrison, N.Y.
Father Egan's work with addicts began in 1952, when he was preaching in a church in Manhattan and saw a troubled woman. She was addicted to narcotics and in need of help. He telephoned a number of hospitals in the city, he recalled later, but none would take her. ''She was considered a criminal,'' he said.
So Father Egan, a Franciscan Friar of the Atonement, became a certified alcohol- and drug-abuse counselor and a chaplain of Narcotics Anonymous. In 1962, he founded Village Haven, a halfway house for women who were addicted to drugs, in Greenwich Village. Before long, 8 or 10 women a week, most of them newly released from jail, were going to Village Haven for help.
''These women face a crisis the moment they are freed,'' Father Egan said in a 1963 interview. ''The simplest things become their deepest need -- a place to eat and sleep, a job, a coat to wear, a friend.''
His work took him far afield. He established a center for drug addicts a decade ago in Calcutta, at Mother Teresa's request. In an interview last year he recalled, ''She was like all saints -- very stubborn.''
Cardinal John O'Connor praised Father Egan in his homily at a Mass attended by Father Egan last September. At the time, Father Egan was serving in nursing homes for AIDS patients and continuing his work against addiction.
The cardinal said that when Father Egan was referred to as ''the Junkie Priest,'' it was ''with great affection and great admiration.''
When Father Egan was a young priest, the cardinal recalled, ''He used to roam the streets of Times Square, and that area in general, looking for ways of helping prostitutes, so many of them addicts to one form of drug or another. God knows how many lives and souls Father Egan has saved in that terribly difficult kind of work.''
A fellow Franciscan Friar of the Atonement, the Rev. Walter Gagne , said that in the 1950's, when Father Egan was beginning his work with addicts, he would go to the old Women's House of Detention in Greenwich Village. Many of its inmates were addicts who had worked as prostitutes. ''He would stand on the sidewalk by the prison and start talking to the women up in the prison windows,'' said Father Gagne, and pretty soon: ''They'd be yelling at him, and he'd be yelling back at them. He was ministering to them even before they got out of prison.''
Regardless of how he carried out his ministry, Father Egan thought of the afflicted in spiritual terms. ''If we had the vision of faith,'' he once wrote, ''we would see beneath every behavior -- no matter how repulsive -- beneath every bodily appearance -- no matter how dirty or deformed -- a priceless dignity and value that makes all material facts and scientific technologies fade into insignificance.''
In a 1965 interview at St. Patrick's Villa Retreat House in Nanuet, N.Y., where he was ministering to women who had broken their heroin habit, he said the best way of dealing with drug addicts was through personal counseling.
He also suggested that government agencies fighting drug abuse ''save themselves money and trouble'' by setting up storefront offices in high-addiction neighborhoods.
''Besides the human salvation, think of the prison expenses you'd save,'' he said. ''You could pay these girls $5 a day to just sit there and talk to the junkies who wandered in for a cigarette instead of a fix.''
In 1970, he founded New Hope Manor at Graymoor for teenage girls who were addicted to drugs. Over the years, he also worked as program director at St. Joseph's Rehabilitation Center at Saranac Lake, N.Y., and in programs elsewhere.
He received various honors, including awards for pioneering anti-drug programs in the armed forces.
A native New Yorker, he was the son of a police lieutenant, Thomas J. Egan, and the former Mary Bierne. He went to schools in the Bronx, entered the Friars of the Atonement in 1935, professed his first vows in 1937 and received a bachelor's degree in philosophy and a master's degree in religious education, both from Catholic University in Washington.
He is survived by three brothers, John, Philip and Gerard; and a sister, Veronica Egan.
Photo: The Rev. Daniel Egan in 1963. (Associated Press)

----------------------------------------------


The Wonderful Work of Father Dan
By CARDINAL JOHN J. O'CONNOR

Just the other day I was delighted to receive, from an obviously devoted daughter, a copy of a letter I wrote to her father nearly 40 years ago. It was a letter bidding farewell to one of the finest officers with whom I had the privilege of serving aboard the USS Canberra. I concluded my letter by quoting from a French maxim that had heretofore slipped from my memory--To part is to die a little.

Following this maxim, you should know that the parting I experienced on 10 February reduced my own lifespan quite substantially. So much so, that it has taken this long to gather my thoughts for a column. I wanted to be absolutely certain that I paid the proper respect to one of the finest priests I have ever had the opportunity to come to know and consider my friend--Father Dan Egan, S.A.

A native of the Archdiocese of New York (born June 18, 1915, in the Bronx), Father Dan entered the Friars of the Atonement in 1935, professed his first vows in 1937 and was ordained in 1945. That happens to be the same year I was ordained, and I am quite honest in telling you that I am embarrassed beyond measure to even attempt to measure my priestly service against Father Dan's.

By 1960 he had embarked full time in a ministry still very new to most priests--drug rehabilitation. When so many were still looking at addicts with scorn and contempt, Father Dan long ago realized that each one of these persons was Jesus Christ crying out for help. There was no way that Father Dan could turn his back on them. It wasn't long after his decision to become actively involved in drug prevention and education that he lovingly became known as "The Junkie Priest," the title of a 1970 biography by John D. Harris. Even Mother Teresa, herself a "miracle worker," would eventually tap Father Dan to open a house for addicts in Calcutta.

But, Father Dan didn't limit his activities to drug rehabilitation. He served as a missionary as well, playing a crucial role in the establishment of Good Shepherd Parish in Braeton, Jamaica, West Indies. While doing this, he remarkably found both the time and energy to assist in the care of St. Monica's Home for those with Hansen's disease (leprosy) in Central Village.

One would think that all this--or even half this--would tire out any priest. Most likely, but not Father Dan. When he died at 84 years of age, Father Dan had taken up a new ministry. He managed as often as possible to get to his "last battlefield"--AIDS ministry at the Highbridge Woodycrest Center. It was there, he said, "that I find all the profound mysteries."

I could go on and on describing the wonderful priestly work of this zealot. Better yet, permit me to end this simple column about a simple priest who had over the years become my good friend by saying that which I know would please him most: Father Dan was a man and a priest of deep, deep piety. He knew exactly what God wanted him to do, and he always saw it through, despite obstacles or possibilities of controversy. I will never forget or stop admiring the energy that gushed forth from his slight body.

I have already received a number of letters from people whose lives had been touched for the good by this gentle priest. I am certain that the energy which belonged so peculiarly to Father Dan will continue to generate wonderful work for many years to come, albeit from a new and far better place. Rest in peace, my friend.


 
 
Burial:
Friars Cemetery at Graymoor
Garrison
Putnam County
New York, USA
Plot: Tier 2 Row 4 Grave 4
 
Maintained by: Bro. Timothy F. MacDonal...
Originally Created by: Helen (Holly) (nee Head)...
Record added: Feb 21, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 65936931
Rev Fr Daniel Egan
Added by: Eman Bonnici
 
Rev Fr Daniel Egan
Added by: NBerger
 
 
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.


- Linda Tremper
 Added: Sep. 12, 2016
This soul's grave was visited on a sunny Summer afternoon and a prayer was offered
- Gene Baumwoll CSW
 Added: Jul. 20, 2016
XXIII Years
- Friend of Bill W.
 Added: Jul. 1, 2016
There are 3 more notes not showing...
Click here to view all notes...
 
 
 Advertisement

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service