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 • Hudson (Pasco County)
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Richard Clifton Ford
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Birth: Sep. 7, 1925
Wichita
Sedgwick County
Kansas, USA
Death: Jun. 16, 1998
Port Richey
Pasco County
Florida, USA

Richard Clifton Ford was born on Sept. 7, 1925 to George Bryan Ford and Clara Elizabeth Kimsey Ford in Wichita, KS. He served in the US Navy during WW II and married Erma Lou Smith in 1947. Clifton graduated from Oakland City College and Central Theological Seminary. He was a General Baptist pastor, missionary to Saipan, and was a college professor for 27 years at Oakland City University. He received an Honorary Doctorate in 1984. Clifton was the father of 2 girls and the grandfather of 10. He married Anita Vachon in 1989. After retirement, he moved to Florida where he died on June 16, 1998. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  George Bryan Ford (1896 - 1955)
  Clara Elizabeth (Kimsey) Ford Haylor (1901 - 1997)
 
 Spouses:
  Erma Lou Smith Ford (1929 - 1997)
  Anita Ruth Vachon Ford (1942 - 2010)*
 
 Sibling:
  George Bryan Ford (1924 - 1924)*
  Richard Clifton Ford (1925 - 1998)
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Grace Memorial Gardens
Hudson (Pasco County)
Pasco County
Florida, USA
 
Created by: beckiinin
Record added: May 11, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 36980703
Richard Clifton Ford
Added by: beckiinin
 
Richard Clifton Ford
Added by: Chris Myers
 
Richard Clifton Ford
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Shannon Ester
 
 
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- Linda Jones
 Added: Jul. 29, 2013
Thank-you for your service.
- J. Pacholke
 Added: Dec. 4, 2011

- Satter3380
 Added: Nov. 24, 2010
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