Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Discussion Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Dr Walter Carl Bauer
Birth: Sep. 25, 1925
Columbus
Franklin County
Ohio, USA
Death: Feb. 2, 2008
Saint Louis
St. Louis City
Missouri, USA

Dr. Walter C. Bauer, an educator and a leader in the famous baby tooth study that searched for evidence of the spread of nuclear fallout, died Saturday (Feb. 2, 2008) at Barnes-Jewish Hospital after a brief illness. He was 82 and a resident of St. Louis.

Dr. Bauer was an early activist with the Greater St. Louis Citizens Committee for Nuclear Information. The group led the St. Louis Baby Tooth Survey in the 1950s and 1960s, which studied almost 300,000 baby teeth, searching for clues about fallout from atomic and hydrogen bomb tests. The study found that the teeth had absorbed nuclear material through consumption of milk from cows that may have eaten contaminated grass. The findings contributed to a ban on the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere.

"My father was insightful and courageous enough to speak out in the 1950s about the serious negative health effects of nuclear devices," said his daughter, Janet Bauer of Portland, Ore.

Dr. Bauer was born [in Columbus, OH] of German parents who immigrated after World War I. He grew up in Ohio and earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Ohio State University. He then graduated from Washington University School of Medicine in 1954.

After his residency in pathology and a fellowship in surgical pathology, he joined the staff at the medical school and then served as head of the surgical pathology department at Barnes-Jewish from 1973 through 1987. He retired from Barnes-Jewish two years later and took a part-time position at St. Louis University, teaching surgical pathology residents. He continued for 19 years until becoming ill a few weeks ago.

Dr. Bauer was also an accomplished marathoner and mountain climber. He ran 17 marathons and reached the summits of Mount Rainier, Mount Shasta and Long's Peak.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Grace and Peace Fellowship, 5574 Delmar Boulevard. A reception will follow. The body was cremated.

In addition to his daughter, among the survivors are his wife of 58 years, Marcia Robbins Bauer; two other daughters, Deborah Bauer of College Park, Md., and Lois Sullivan of Baltimore; a son, Paul Bauer of Copenhagen, Denmark; and four grandchildren.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Walter C. Bauer Vocal Scholarship at the Community Music School of Webster University, 470 East Lockwood Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 63119.

Source: St. Louis Post-Dispatch 2008, February 4th

------

Eulogy read at his memorial service, February 5, 2008

Walter C. Bauer, MD died on February 2, 2008, after a brief illness, at the age of 82. He is survived by his wife Marcia of 58 years, four adult children and four grandchildren. Dr. Bauer was born in Columbus, OH; after his undergraduate degree and graduate work in Chemistry at Ohio State University, he received his MD from Washington University School of Medicine in 1954 and remained there for his Pathology Residency and Fellowship in Surgical Pathology under the tutelage of Dr. Lauren V. Ackerman. Dr. Bauer joined the faculty of Washington University in 1958 and advanced from Instructor to Professor over the next 15 years, in spite of a 2 year hiatus in the armed services. He served as Surgical Pathologist- in- Chief of Barnes Hospital, and Director of the Laboratory of Surgical Pathology of Washington University from 1973-1987. During Dr. Bauer's years as Division Director at Washington University, he trained many of the now recognized pioneers and leaders in the newly emerging field of Surgical Pathology. Dr. Bauer was internationally recognized for his expertise in head and neck pathology, as well as breast pathology, as evidenced by his participation in national committees and invited lectures in these topics. His professional accomplishments included serving as President of the Arthur Purdy Stout Society (1987-1990) a leading society in academic Pathology, and membership in the International Academy of Pathology and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served on the Editorial Board of the American Journal of Surgical Pathology and authored 55 book chapters or peer-reviewed manuscripts in journals including Science and JAMA.

Among his many contributions to Surgical Pathology, he would undoubtedly consider his most significant to be the teaching and career development of the generations of students, residents, fellows and staff. His trainees are recognized by the lessons he taught: that the pathologist's responsibilities are not limited to skills at the microscope, but also include understanding details of the clinical settings for which tissue has been obtained, anticipated outcomes of the disease processes and potential consequences of diagnoses. These concepts were reinforced not only during the interactive and didactic conferences, but with each frozen section evaluation and microscopic case "sign out" discussion. Dr. Bauer's Saturday morning gross case conferences at Barnes were legendary, as were the breakfasts with him and the residents that followed. His quiet and patient, yet exacting manner with students of all levels endeared him to his trainees. His mentoring style allowed independent growth while backed by his support.

Dr. Bauer retired from Washington University in 1989, and continued to actively participate in medical student and resident education and development as a Clinical Professor in the Department of Pathology at Saint Louis University. He was a highly valued member of the senior staff for the past 18 years, and was working there until his recent illness.

In addition to his professional skills, Dr. Bauer had many other talents and interests. . He not only was an educated opera lover, but also was a performing musician who treated the St. Louis community to a solo concert in the early 1990's. He maintained an art studio and created numerous sculptures that grace many yards in the community. Dr. Bauer was a gourmet cook and wine connoisseur who treated many Surgical Pathology Fellows to his culinary skills and his recipes over the years. He was an avid runner who ran marathons before it became fashionable to do so. In his later years, he and Marcia participated in several community service-related Elderhostel trips.

During this time of sorrow, the memories of the richness of his life will sustain the many friends, colleagues and students fortunate enough to have known Dr. Bauer. The Department of Pathology and Immunology at Washington University School of Medicine extends its sincere condolences to the family.

------

St. Louis pathologist Walter Bauer dies

Tuesday, February 5, 2008, as printed in the Southeast Missourian, Cape Girardeau, MO, February 21, 2008

By CHERYL WITTENAUER ~ The Associated Press

ST. LOUIS -- Dr. Walter Bauer, a pathologist and leader in the famous baby tooth study that helped show the spread of nuclear fallout, has died. He was 82.

Bauer of St. Louis died Saturday after falling ill last month; he died of acute respiratory distress, his wife, Marcia Robbins Bauer, said Monday.

Bauer, along with renowned biologist and environmentalist Barry Commoner, was a founding member of a committee of St. Louis scientists and residents concerned about nuclear testing in the 1950s, following development of the atom bomb in World War II.

The Greater St. Louis Citizens Committee for Nuclear Information led the St. Louis Baby Tooth Survey from 1958 to 1970, which studied almost 300,000 baby teeth, searching for evidence of fallout from atomic and hydrogen bomb tests.

The study found that the teeth had absorbed nuclear material through children's consuming milk from cows that ate contaminated grass. The findings contributed to a ban on above-ground testing of atomic bombs in the early 1960s.

Other baby tooth surveys were formed and patterned after the St. Louis program elsewhere in the U.S. and overseas.

Commoner, who taught plant physiology at Washington University for more than 30 years, where he founded the Centre for the Biology of Natural Systems, said Bauer was a critical member of the committee, and as a well-known physician and community speaker, persuaded parents to have their children participate.

"There were a lot of us who believed fallout from nuclear tests had to stop," said Commoner, now 90. "It got a lot of publicity. President Johnson referred to [the survey]."

Commoner said the committee grew out of daily lunch meetings of Washington University scientists.

A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. today at Grace and Peace Fellowship.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by three daughters, a son and four grandchildren.

------

From the TimesOnline (London UK), February 12, 2008

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/obituaries/article3359039.ece

Walter Bauer

Pathologist who led the ‘baby tooth' study that helped to end atmospheric nuclear testing

The pathologist Walter Bauer was best known for his leadership of the "baby tooth" study. Bauer, with the biologist and environmentalist Barry Commoner, was a founding member of a committee of scientists, doctors and citizens concerned about the consequences of nuclear-weapon testing in the 1950s. The committee grew out of daily lunch meetings of scientists at Washington University, St Louis.

The committee, called the Greater St Louis Citizens Committee for Nuclear Information, led the St Louis Baby Tooth Survey from 1958 until 1970, which collected and studied almost 300,000 baby teeth looking for evidence that human beings were ingesting radioactivity in the fallout from atomic and hydrogen bombs exploded in the atmosphere. Other baby tooth surveys, patterned after the St Louis survey, were undertaken in America and in other countries.

The St Louis study showed that the radioactive isotope strontium-90 was accumulating in the teeth of babies. The strontium was produced as a fission product when nuclear weapons were tested in the atmosphere.

The fission products were widely spread by the winds. Some radioactivity was brought down to Earth, particularly by the rain, and cows ate some of the contaminated grass. Human beings then drank the cows' milk and absorbed the radioactive strontium, which behaves like calcium in the body, into their bones and teeth. To speak out about the serious adverse health effects of nuclear testing during the Cold War in the 1950s took considerable courage.

Mothers, worried about damage to the health of their babies, joined the campaign to end nuclear testing in the atmosphere. This public pressure was a big contribution to the negotiation in 1963 of a ban on the testing of nuclear weapons in the atmosphere and under water, known as the Partial Test Ban Treaty (PTBT), which was eventually ratified by 125 countries.

The first nuclear test took place at Alamogordo in the New Mexico desert on July 16, 1945. Between then and October 10, 1963, when the PTBT came into force, about 518 nuclear tests were conducted in the atmosphere, by China, France, the Soviet Union, Britain and the US.

The total yield of these nuclear tests was about 40,000 times that of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. The radioactivity from them spread all around the Earth resulting in the pervasive pollution of the Earth, damaging the health of people well into the future.

Today, caesium, strontium and plutonium radioactive isotopes from the atmospheric tests pollute our food and water. The pollution would be much worse if the PTBT had not been negotiated. It is estimated that more than two million people will die of cancer because of their exposure to radiation from fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests; many have already died.

Walter Bauer was born in 1925 in Columbus, Ohio, of German parents who migrated to America after the First World War. He took his BSc in chemistry from Ohio State University.

In 1954 he went to the Washington University School of Medicine and after completing a fellowship in surgical pathology he joined the staff at the medical school. In 1973 he was appointed head of the surgical pathology department at the Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St Louis, a post he held until 1987.

He retired from Barnes-Jewish in 1989 and took a part-time appointment at St Louis University School of Medicine as a teacher of surgical pathology. He continued teaching until shortly before he died.

Bauer was an enthusiastic and accomplished runner of marathons, running 17 of them, and a keen mountain climber and fisherman. He died of acute respiratory distress.

His wife, three daughters and a son survive him.

Walter Bauer, pathologist, was born on September 25, 1925. He died on February 2, 2008, aged 82

------

From Time Magazine

US Edition, February 18, 2008, Vol 171, No. 7

Milestones

TODDLER TEETH turned deadly serious--and scientifically invaluable--in 1958, when pathologist Walter Bauer helped start the St. Louis Baby Tooth Survey to study the effects of nuclear fallout on children. By 1970 the team had collected 300,000 shed primary teeth, which, they discovered, had absorbed nuclear waste from the milk of cows that were fed contaminated grass. The study helped establish an early-'60s ban on aboveground A-bomb testing and led to similar surveys across the U.S. and the rest of the world. Bauer was 82.
 
 
Burial:
Cremated, Location of ashes is unknown.
 
Created by: Mark Albert Hurt, MD
Record added: Feb 04, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 24393078
Dr Walter Carl Bauer
Added by: Anonymous
 
Dr Walter Carl Bauer
Added by: Anonymous
 
Dr Walter Carl Bauer
Added by: Anonymous
 
 
There are 2 more photos not showing...
Click here to view all images...
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.

In memory of Dr Bauer who loved life, nature and the worldaround him. He has forever touched our lives and our hearts
- christy thompson
 Added: Apr. 20, 2012
For all you taught pathologists around the world.
- sarah walsh
 Added: Jan. 17, 2010

- J.A. & D.S.
 Added: Sep. 18, 2009
There is 1 more note not showing...
Click here to view all notes...
 
This page is sponsored by: Mark Albert Hurt, MD

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service