Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Discussion Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Sponsor This Memorial!
Advertisement
Donald Gorman "Donnie" Klum
Learn about upgrading this memorial...
Birth: Jun. 21, 1932
Sweet Home
Linn County
Oregon, USA
Death: Mar. 24, 2011
Redmond
Deschutes County
Oregon, USA




Thank you everyone that has remembered Donnie with a token. He was a wonderful person and fought his terrible disease with dignity and grace...He is with his Lord now and free from the pain that was with him for the last few years...







Published: March 29. 2011 4:00AM PST
Donald Gorman Klum

Donald Gorman Klum

June 21, 1932 - March 24, 2011

Don was born to Frank and Myrtle Klum in Sweet Home, Oregon. He finished high school there as class president in 1950. He married and started a family and lived in the Northwest over 70 years.

He raced stock cars, rodeoed and worked the timber industry from felling trees to selling lumber.

He moved to Central Oregon in 1975. Started welding woodstoves and soon owned and operated Centennial Woodstoves Inc. in Redmond. He built a sawmill and operated it in La Pine, OR. He managed McKenzie Water Proofing in Redmond.

He loved to have his family and friends close.

He was preceded in death by his oldest son, Donnie in 2003. He is survived by his sons, Denny and Gary of Redmond, and Jeff of Prineville, five grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and his life partner, Joan Jackson. He will be missed greatly.

Memorial will be held April 8, 2011 at 1 p.m. at VFW in Redmond, OR.

Donnie was my first cousin..

 
 
Burial:
Cremated, Ashes given to family or friend.
 
Created by: Alice Morton
Record added: Apr 02, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 67811059
 


- Alice Morton
 Added: Aug. 23, 2015

- Kindredspirit
 Added: Nov. 28, 2014

- dhb
 Added: Mar. 24, 2014
There are 127 more notes not showing...
Click here to view all notes...
 
 
 Advertisement

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service