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Firas Wahid Eiso
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Birth: Feb. 5, 1983, Iraq
Death: Mar. 1, 2006
El Cajon
San Diego County
California, USA

Firas Wahid Eiso was a clerk who was brutally murdered during a robbery along with his co-worker Heather Nabil Mattia. The crime went unsolved for most of 2006, until two men were arrested and charged with two counts of capital murder. Jean Pierre Rices, the triggerman, plead guilty and was sentenced to die for his crimes. He is on death row at San Quentin State Prison. His co-defendant Anthony James Miller, was tried. Prosecutors did not seek the death penalty. His first trial ended with a deadlocked jury. He is currently ( November 2009) facing retrial. He faces life without the possiblity of parole. UPDATE: Anthony James Miller, accomplice to his murder, was convicted of first degree murder in January 2010. He was subsequently sentenced to 52 years to life in prison.

The inscription on his grave reads:

God looked around his Kingdom and saw an empty place, then he looked down to earth and saw your loving face.

May he rest in everlasting peace.

 
 
Burial:
Holy Cross Cemetery
San Diego
San Diego County
California, USA
 
Created by: Alex Vieza
Record added: Nov 09, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 44119970
Firas Wahid Eiso
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Kit and Morgan Benson
 
 
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- Lance
 Added: Dec. 14, 2015
Never forgotten.
- Amy Wolfe
 Added: Jun. 13, 2014
I know it has been awhile, but YOU have stayed in my thoughts and most importantly in my mind <3
- Amy Wolfe
 Added: Apr. 3, 2012
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