Actions
Begin New Search
Refine Last Search
Cemetery Lookup
Add Burial Records
Help with Find A Grave

Top Contributors
Success Stories
Community Forums
Find A Grave Store

Log In
Sponsor This Memorial! Advertisement
John Gabriel Jones
Learn about removing the ads from this memorial...
Birth: Jun. 6, 1752
Williamsburg
Williamsburg City
Virginia, USA
Death: Dec. 25, 1776
Kentucky, USA



John Gabriel JONES
Surname: Jones
Given Name: John Gabriel
Prefix: Dr.
Nickname: Jack
Sex: M
Birth: 6 Jun 1752 in Williamsburg, VA
Death: 25 Dec 1776 near Blue Licks, Harrodsburg, KY. killed by Indians

Occupation: intends to practice law 19 May 1773 Augusta Co., VA
Event: listed as qualified attorney Occupation 2 17 Aug 1773 Augusta Co., VA
Event: elected to Virginia's new House of Delegates Occupation 3 Jun 1776
Probate: Nov 1779 Botetourt Co., VA
Note:
746. West Fincastle Co., Virginia. Petition, 1776. CW. 1 item. Petition to the Convention of Virginia requesting the right of Fincastle County to send their elected representatives, John Gabriel Jones and George Rogers Clark, to the convention, dated at Harrodsburg, 20 June 1776. Appears to be a rough draft of the petition.
http://www.filsonhistorical.org/guide8.html

AN HISTORICAL SKETCH OF WASHINGTON COUNTY
By Lewis Preston Summers

By the year 1776, population had increased greatly throughout Southwest Virginia and numerous setflements were found in Kentucky and what is now a part of East Tennessee. The extent of the territory Included in Fincastle County was so great that there was an insistent demand that Fincastle County be divided into two or more counties; and in the year 1776, the settlers in Kentucky assembled and selected General George Rogers Clark and Hon. John Gabriel Jones as their representatives, and sent them to Richmond to the Genjeal Assembly of the new Commonwealth, to demand a division of Fincastle County...

The representatives from Fincastle County, having and exercising all the powers of government, were very much averse to the division of Fincastle County and of being deprived of their power and position in government. When General George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones appeared at Richmond they found the measure proposed by them vigorously opposed by Col. Arthur Campbell and Col. William Russell and probably by William Christian. The question of the division of Fincastle County was brought to the attention of the General Assembly of Virginia and was submitted to a committee of which Hon. Carter Braxton was Chairman, and Thomas Jefferson, a member. The question of the division of the County of Fincastle was referred to Thomas Jefferson by the committee of which he was a member; and, after a long and bitter struggle, Mr. Jefferson recommended to the committee, and the committee recommended to the General Assembly that Fincastle County be divided into two counties. And on motion of Col. William Christian, the recommendation of the House Committee was amended in the Senate, and the bill provided for a division of Fincastle County into three counties, to-wit: Montgomery County, Washington County, and Kentucky County. Montgomery County was named for Robert -Montgomery, a Revolutionary patriot; Washington County, for General Washington; and Kentucky (Kentucke) County was given an Indian name. This bill became a law on the 6th of December, 1776, and provided that the first court of Washington County should assemble at Black's Fort on the 28th of January, 1777. On the 28th of January, 1777, the first court of Washington County assembled at Black's Fort, now Abingdon, Virginia, with the following officers present, and members of the County Court commissioned by Governor Patrick Henry on the 21st day of December, 1776...
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
According to Waddell's Annals of Augusta Co., Va. John Grabriel was killed by Indians in Kentucky 1776? This John received the "COAT OF THE BLUE CLOTH" in his fathers will. Several clues indicate to me this John Jones was the Rev. Jones recommended by Gov. Dinwiddie of Williamsburg, Va. One of the clues is this Coat of the Blue Cloth................remembering John's brother Gabriel went to the Blue Coat school in England to become a lawyer........I believe John has gone to this same school & become a minister? Still has the coat to prove it. The people in this community were mostly Presbyterian and they did not have a Church Per say, so the minister would travel by horse from meeting place to meeting place to Worship. By British Law they had to recognize & give some comfort to the Established Church, The Kings Church, Episcopalian; however these people were DISSENTERS, giving only lip service to the King. This John Jones wrote his Will 7-14-1773 just after the minister John Jones stopped his ministry, which is another clue.
http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:770481&id=I1208
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Doctor in Prince William County, Va 11MiiJohn Gabriel Jones "Jack" was born on 6 Jun 1752 in Virginia. He died on 25 Dec 1776 in Blue Licks, Ky. In Augusta County, Va May 19, 1773 Augusta County, Va ORDER BOOK No. XV. (102) John Gabriel Jones intends to practice law, and gets certificate of good behavior. August 17, 1773 (145) John Gabriel Jones qualified attorney.Will probated Botetourt County, Va November 1779 Names brothers, Samuel (a surgeon). Gabriel and Thomas. A brother-in-law Thomas Griffith, a friend Patrick Lockhart. Sisters; Elizabeth, Ann, Margaret, Charlotte Griffith- property in England. His father was John Jones. Grandfather Samuel Slade, both of England. Black powder for the rifles is running low. So young George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones are delegated as deputies to go to the capital at Williamsburg to ask the Virginia Assembly for help. But on the way Jones' horse gives out and they are forced to walk. It rains for four days and they develop "scald feet," a painful 18th century version of trench foot. Clark later writes that they went through "greater torment than I ever before or since experienced." Nicholas County, Va Present day Kentucky The First Expedition After The Powder brought down the Ohio River by (Gen.) George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones in December 1776, and secreted on the Three Islands, some ten miles above Limestone (Maysville), set out from McClelland's Station (Georgetown), a day or two after the arrival there of Clark and Jones, with the intelligence. Nine men on horseback, under Col. John Todd, piloted by Jones, were waylaid on December 28th, on Johnson's Fork of Licking, near the Lower Blue Licks, by a small party of Indians; who were following the recent trail of Clark and Jones. The Indians made a sudden and vigorous attack, killed Jones and Wm. Graden, and took Jos. Rogers prisoner. Josiah Dixon was missing and never heard of anymore. The rest, among them Samuel McMillin, retreated safely. George Rogers Clark called a meeting of the independent settlers at Harrodsburg, June 6, 1776. The people prepared a much stronger protest against Henderson and also the British, and selected Clark and a young attorney, John Gabriel Jones, as delegates to carry the petition directly to Williamsburg. The two young men started on the Wilderness Road. They got along very well at first. But on the third day, Jone?s horse gave out and had to be abandoned. They put their packs on the other horse, and took turns riding and walking. Heavy rains set in , and they found hard going. They could not even make a fire to dry their drenched clothes for fear of the Indians. Their feet became ?scalded? and sore. They heard guns in the forest, and were sure the Indians were near. They passed through Cumberland Gap and on up Powells Valley to Martins Station, expecting relief there, but found the place deserted, and there were Indian tracks around. They were exhausted, and had 60 miles yet to go to reach a settlement. There was corn in a crib near by, and a hog in a lot. They formed a plan. Clark selected a small cabin standing out from the rest. He climbed to the roof, working his way inside, and cut the lock that secured the door. Jones went after the hog with his sword. He got a keg of water, brought in some corn, and the carcas of the hog. Then they barred the door and made a fire. They cut out portholes in the wall, and arranged their rifles, sabers, pistols and ammunition on a table, and planned for defense in case of attack. They prepared food, and bathed their aching feet with water in which oak bark had been boiled. They were very well fixed to stand a siege. When night came they heard the tinkle of a bell. They awaited an attack from the Indians, but soon discovered two white men creeping toward the cabin. They opened the door and called loudly to the men. They were from Fort Blackmore, returning to take up some things they had left a few days before. They had seen smoke from the chimney and thought Indians were in the cabin. They were creeping up to make an attack. Jones and Clark rested several days to allow their feet to get well, then they resumed their journey. When they reached Fincastle they learned that the Virginia Legislature had adjourned. Jones returned to the Holston settlement and Clark went on to Hanover to the home of Governor Patrick Henry. The Governor was ill, but he received Clark and heard his account of the west, and his wishes. Henry had spoken his famous words against King George III, and had taken bold stand for liberty. He was ready to aid the liberty-loving, free settlers in the west. He heard Clark?s request for 500 pounds of powder, and gave him a letter to the executive council at the capitol. Clark went to Williamsburg at once, but the Council did not want to let him have the powder, because a war with Great Britain was on hand. Those settlements were not officially recognized. To give them the supplies would indicate a duty to protect them. It was a hard case, but they would only loan the powder to Clark. But the careful representative would accept no compromise. He said: If a country is not worth protecting, it is not worth claiming. They at length yielded, and gave him the powder. All of the extreme southwestern part of Virginia was then included in Fincastle County, which was represented by Colonel Arthur Campbell. Kentucky had not yet been made a County of Virginia. When the Assembly met, Clark and Jones presented themselves as delegates on the strength of instructions from the Harrodsburg Convention. Colonel Campbell opposed them. Colonel Henderson was also there to lobby against them because of his claim on the land he had bought from the Cherokee Indians. But Clark and Jones won. The Virginia Legislature passes an act which made Kentucky a County from a part of Fincastle County. This measure was passed December 6, 1776. When Kentucky thus became a County of Virginia. George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones were its first representatives in the Virginia Assembly. Henderson was later partly compensated by a grant of 200,000 acres of land along the Ohio were Henderson, Kentucky was founded. Clark and Jones had trouble getting their grant of 500 pounds of powder to Harrodsburg. It was sent down the Ohio River, and Jones went up from Harrodsburg with some men to get it. They fell into an Indian ambush, and Jones and three of his men were killed. 12MiiiGabriel Jones was born on 24 Jun 1754. 13FivMary Elizabeth Jones was born on 25 Jul 1756. 14FvElizabeth Bates Jones was born on 30 Aug 1758. 15FviAnn Margaret Jones was born on 11 Oct 1762. 16MviiThomas Jones 17FviiiCharlotte Jones Charlotte married Thomas Griffith. George Rogers Clark in S.W. Virginia " George Rogers Clark & John Gabriel Jones Travel the Wilderness Road " In 1776, the settlers of Kentucky were fed up with all the land holding conflicts created by Henderson's Transylvania Company and others. Frequently several families had bought the rights to the same piece of land and hostilities were narrowly averted. Choosing Clark and Jones to represent them, they urged to take their petition to the Va. General Assembly for resolution. On previous trips, Clark had traveled down the Ohio River, but this time they would travel the famous Wilderness Road. Leaving Harrodsburg, Kentucky, they found the going relatively easy for a while. The numerous travelers had blazed a very clear trail and a few improvements had actually been made to difficult stretches. Here and there they encountered other settlers coming into the territory and occasionally they passed cabins or heard the sound of livestock in the distant meadows. On the third day, Jones' horse gave out and they had to transfer all their gear to Clark's, and take turns riding. Heavy rains set in and they were soaked to the skin. Trudging on through the rain and mud, the two developed scalded feet (from their constantly wet moccasins). Fearing to risk a fire, they painfully continued on through the Cumberland Gap to an abandoned camp 8 miles West of Martin's Station (near Jonesville, Va.). After resting overnight, they awoke to more rain but had little choice but to continue on. If they could make the Station, surely they could find warm, dry quarters and could rest until their feet healed. It took them almost all day to painfully trek the remaining distance to the outpost. When they finally arrived they found it deserted - and fresh Indian sign all around. Their situation was now desperate. They were 60 miles from the nearest settlement, had only one horse, could hardly walk, and Indians surely were lurking about the area. After thinking over their situation, they decided to fortify one of the remaining cabins and burn the stockade to attract the attention of any travelers that might be nearby. With the water from an old barrel they found, some corn left in a crib, and the meat from a hog they found in a lot, they might be able to hold out until help arrived. In the meantime, they would make an "oil & ouse" to treat their blistered feet. During the night, as they passed the nervous hours, they heard the faint sound of a horse bell. Fearing Indians were creeping up on them, they waited nervously and peered intently into the blackness around them. It seemed like hours passed without another sound. Then to their relief, the approaching group turned out to be White Men. They presented themselves in full view to the group and shouted loudly. The visitors were from the Clinch Settlements and were returning for some of the things they had left when the station was abandoned a few days before. The next day, Clark and Jones were given fresh horses and accompanied by their new friends to Fort Blackmore where they remained for several days to allow their feet to heal. Stories were exchanged with eagerness. When they were well, they continued their journey through Moccasin Gap and turned East toward Royal Oak (in Marion, Va.). They then crossed the New River at Ingles Ferry and continued on to Fincastle. Here they learned that the General Assembly had already adjourned. Hearing this, Jones returned to the Holston Settlements and took part in an expedition against the Cherokees. Clark continued to the home of Governor Patrick Henry where he explained his mission. The Governor gave him a letter to present to the Virginia Executive Council at Williamsburg. Clark asked them for powder and support for the Kentucky Settlements but found them reluctant to grant his request. They were uncertain about "officially" committing Virginia's support because of the question of who actually "owned" the territory and controlled the land rights there. Eventually they agreed to give powder to Clark but not to the Kentucky Settlements. To their surprise, Clark refused. "If a country isn't worth protecting, it isn't worth claiming!", he shouted. "If Virginia won't defend Kenducky, we will go elsewhere." - -- Clark got his powder and on his terms. A few weeks later, Clark and Jones were on hand to present their case to the Va. General Assembly. Also present was Col. Henderson, who was trying desperately to get recognition of his claim to the land he had purchased from the Cherokees. Again Clark and Jones prevailed and received the official sanction they sought. The Legislature passed an Act on 12/6/1776, which established the County of Kentucky out of the Western part of Fincastle County. Henderson's personal empire was doomed. Clark and Jones returned through Fort Pitt to pick up their powder. During their trip down the Ohio with the powder, they encountered frequent Indian activity. Fearing they might lose it, they were forced to hide it in several locations not far from Limestone. The two continued on to Harrodsburg with the good news. After much celebration, Jones led a party to get the much needed powder. From nowhere an ambush was sprung and he and 3 others were slain and the powder lost. As was often the case on the frontier, victory was often short and quickly replaced by another tragedy. From: Pathfinders, Pioneers, & Patriots Danny Dixon **************************************************** JOHN GABRIEL JONES Will probated November 1779 Names brothers, Samuel (a surgeon). Gabriel and Thomas.A brother-in-law Thomas Griffith, a friend Patrick Lockhart. Sisters; Elizabeth, Ann, Margaret, Charlotte Griffith- property in England. His father was John Jones. Grandfather Samuel Slade, both of England.In Augusta County, Va May 19, 1773 Augusta County, Va ORDER BOOK No. XV. (102) John Gabriel Jones intends to practice law, and gets certificate of good behavior. August 17, 1773 (145) John Gabriel Jones qualified attorney. Will probated Botetourt County, Va November 1779 Names brothers, Samuel (a surgeon). Gabriel and Thomas. A brother-in-law Thomas Griffith, a friend Patrick Lockhart. Sisters; Elizabeth, Ann, Margaret, Charlotte Griffith- property in England. His father was John Jones. Grandfather Samuel Slade, both of England. Black powder for the rifles is running low. So young George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones are delegated as deputies to go to the capital at Williamsburg to ask the Virginia Assembly for help. But on the way Jones' horse gives out and they are forced to walk. It rains for four days and they develop "scald feet," a painful 18th century version of trench foot. Clark later writes that they went through "greater torment than I ever before or since experienced." Nicholas County, Va Present day Kentucky The First Expedition After The Powder brought down the Ohio River by (Gen.) George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones in December 1776, and secreted on the Three Islands, some ten miles above Limestone (Maysville), set out from McClelland's Station (Georgetown), a day or two after the arrival there of Clark and Jones, with the intelligence. Nine men on horseback, under Col. John Todd, piloted by Jones, were waylaid on December 28th, on Johnson's Fork of Licking, near the Lower Blue Licks, by a small party of Indians; who were following the recent trail of Clark and Jones. The Indians made a sudden and vigorous attack, killed Jones and Wm. Graden, and took Jos. Rogers prisoner. Josiah Dixon was missing and never heard of anymore. The rest, among them Samuel McMillin, retreated safely. George Rogers Clark called a meeting of the independent settlers at Harrodsburg, June 6, 1776. The people prepared a much stronger protest against Henderson and also the British, and selected Clark and a young attorney, John Gabriel Jones, as delegates to carry the petition directly to Williamsburg. The two young men started on the Wilderness Road. They got along very well at first. But on the third day, Jone?s horse gave out and had to be abandoned. They put their packs on the other horse, and took turns riding and walking. Heavy rains set in , and they found hard going. They could not even make a fire to dry their drenched clothes for fear of the Indians. Their feet became ?scalded? and sore. They heard guns in the forest, and were sure the Indians were near. They passed through Cumberland Gap and on up Powells Valley to Martins Station, expecting relief there, but found the place deserted, and there were Indian tracks around. They were exhausted, and had 60 miles yet to go to reach a settlement. There was corn in a crib near by, and a hog in a lot. They formed a plan. Clark selected a small cabin standing out from the rest. He climbed to the roof, working his way inside, and cut the lock that secured the door. Jones went after the hog with his sword. He got a keg of water, brought in some corn, and the carcas of the hog. Then they barred the door and made a fire. They cut out portholes in the wall, and arranged their rifles, sabers, pistols and ammunition on a table, and planned for defense in case of attack. They prepared food, and bathed their aching feet with water in which oak bark had been boiled. They were very well fixed to stand a siege. When night came they heard the tinkle of a bell. They awaited an attack from the Indians, but soon discovered two white men creeping toward the cabin. They opened the door and called loudly to the men. They were from Fort Blackmore, returning to take up some things they had left a few days before. They had seen smoke from the chimney and thought Indians were in the cabin. They were creeping up to make an attack. Jones and Clark rested several days to allow their feet to get well, then they resumed their journey. When they reached Fincastle they learned that the Virginia Legislature had adjourned. Jones returned to the Holston settlement and Clark went on to Hanover to the home of Governor Patrick Henry. The Governor was ill, but he received Clark and heard his account of the west, and his wishes. Henry had spoken his famous words against King George III, and had taken bold stand for liberty. He was ready to aid the liberty-loving, free settlers in the west. He heard Clark?s request for 500 pounds of powder, and gave him a letter to the executive council at the capitol. Clark went to Williamsburg at once, but the Council did not want to let him have the powder, because a war with Great Britain was on hand. Those settlements were not officially recognized. To give them the supplies would indicate a duty to protect them. It was a hard case, but they would only loan the powder to Clark. But the careful representative would accept no compromise. He said: If a country is not worth protecting, it is not worth claiming. They at length yielded, and gave him the powder. All of the extreme southwestern part of Virginia was then included in Fincastle County, which was represented by Colonel Arthur Campbell. Kentucky had not yet been made a County of Virginia. When the Assembly met, Clark and Jones presented themselves as delegates on the strength of instructions from the Harrodsburg Convention. Colonel Campbell opposed them. Colonel Henderson was also there to lobby against them because of his claim on the land he had bought from the Cherokee Indians. But Clark and Jones won. The Virginia Legislature passes an act which made Kentucky a County from a part of Fincastle County. This measure was passed December 6, 1776. When Kentucky thus became a County of Virginia. George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones were its first representatives in the Virginia Assembly. Henderson was later partly compensated by a grant of 200,000 acres of land along the Ohio were Henderson, Kentucky was founded. Clark and Jones had trouble getting their grant of 500 pounds of powder to Harrodsburg. It was sent down the Ohio River, and Jones went up from Harrodsburg with some men to get it. They fell into an Indian ambush, and Jones and three of his men were killed. 12MiiiGabriel Jones was born on 13FivMary Elizabeth Jones was born on 25 Jul 1756. 14FvElizabeth Bates Jones was born on 30 Aug 1758. 1 5FviAnn Margaret Jones was born on 11 Oct 1762. 16MviiThomas Jones 17FviiiCharlotte Jones Charlotte married Thomas Griffith.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The chronicles of George Rogers Clark
http://www.wfpl.org/grc/29.htm
THE CLARK CHRONICLE #29 for air week of June 3rd Kentucky territory attracts settlers and arguments over who owns it

Kentucky territory attracts settlers and arguments over who owns it Early June, 1776, Year 2 of Revolution! Land hunger has brought many men to this unclaimed portion of territory "attached" to the mother state of Virginia. But who owns the land? Various land companies lay claim to it. Pennsylvania and Virginia squabble over it. Britain's King George has even drawn a line at the Appalachians to bar western settlement. But nobody pays much attention, and the settlers come. Clark is delegated to find an answer from the Virginia Assembly But Kentucky, the "Land of Tomorrow," as the Wyandots call it, is protected by nobody. Black powder for the rifles is running low. So young George Rogers Clark and John Gabriel Jones are delegated as deputies to go to the capital at Williamsburg to ask the Virginia Assembly for help. But on the way Jones' horse gives out and they are forced to walk. It rains for four days and they develop "scald feet," a painful 18th century version of trench foot. Clark later writes that they went through "greater torment than I ever before or since experienced." Clark and Jones distracted from their mission Hobbling along through hostile territory they come to an abandoned station or small fort, and settle in to rest. In the evening they hear a group approaching and prepare for an Indian attack. But it is only the former occupants come to reclaim some property. Clark-at 23 an experienced woodsman and Indian fighter-is amused at how inept and clumsy they are. He and Jones show themselves and the episode is over. Virginia Executive Council compromises on Kentucky's fate But when they reach Virginia they find that the Assembly has already adjourned. Clark goes alone to Williamsburg to see governor Patrick Henry who writes to the Executive Council approving the Kentuckian's request. And now politics come into play. If the council rejects the deputies, they are in effect rejecting Kentucky, which would now be free to establish it's own independent government. If they accept the delegates, they are admitting that Virginia is indeed responsible for this vast western territory. What they do to compromise will anger George Rogers Clark!

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
George Rogers Clark in S.W. Virginia Surname: Clark Submitted By: Danny Dixon Date Submitted: Dec 01, 2002 Description: " George Rogers Clark & John Gabriel Jones Travel the Wilderness Road "

In 1776, the settlers of Kentucky were fed up with all the land holding conflicts created by Henderson's Transylvania Company and others. Frequently several families had bought the rights to the same piece of land and hostilities were narrowly averted. Choosing Clark and Jones to represent them, they urged to take their petition to the Va. General Assembly for resolution. On previous trips, Clark had traveled down the Ohio River, but this time they would travel the famous Wilderness Road. Leaving Harrodsburg, Kentucky, they found the going relatively easy for a while. The numerous travelers had blazed a very clear trail and a few improvements had actually been made to difficult stretches. Here and there they encountered other settlers coming into the territory and occasionally they passed cabins or heard the sound of livestock in the distant meadows. On the third day, Jones' horse gave out and they had to transfer all their gear to Clark's, and take turns riding. Heavy rains set in and they were soaked to the skin. Trudging on through the rain and mud, the two developed scalded feet (from their constantly wet moccasins). Fearing to risk a fire, they painfully continued on through the Cumberland Gap to an abandoned camp 8 miles West of Martin's Station (near Jonesville, Va.). After resting overnight, they awoke to more rain but had little choice but to continue on. If they could make the Station, surely they could find warm, dry quarters and could rest until their feet healed. It took them almost all day to painfully trek the remaining distance to the outpost. When they finally arrived they found it deserted - and fresh Indian sign all around. Their situation was now desperate. They were 60 miles from the nearest settlement, had only one horse, could hardly walk, and Indians surely were lurking about the area. After thinking over their situation, they decided to fortify one of the remaining cabins and burn the stockade to attract the attention of any travelers that might be nearby. With the water from an old barrel they found, some corn left in a crib, and the meat from a hog they found in a lot, they might be able to hold out until help arrived. In the meantime, they would make an "oil & ouse" to treat their blistered feet. During the night, as they passed the nervous hours, they heard the faint sound of a horse bell. Fearing Indians were creeping up on them, they waited nervously and peered intently into the blackness around them. It seemed like hours passed without another sound. Then to their relief, the approaching group turned out to be White Men. They presented themselves in full view to the group and shouted loudly. The visitors were from the Clinch Settlements and were returning for some of the things they had left when the station was abandoned a few days before. The next day, Clark and Jones were given fresh horses and accompanied by their new friends to Fort Blackmore where they remained for several days to allow their feet to heal. Stories were exchanged with eagerness. When they were well, they continued their journey through Moccasin Gap and turned East toward Royal Oak (in Marion, Va.). They then crossed the New River at Ingles Ferry and continued on to Fincastle. Here they learned that the General Assembly had already adjourned. Hearing this, Jones returned to the Holston Settlements and took part in an expedition against the Cherokees. Clark continued to the home of Governor Patrick Henry where he explained his mission. The Governor gave him a letter to present to the Virginia Executive Council at Williamsburg. Clark asked them for powder and support for the Kentucky Settlements but found them reluctant to grant his request. They were uncertain about "officially" committing Virginia's support because of the question of who actually "owned" the territory and controlled the land rights there. Eventually they agreed to give powder to Clark but not to the Kentucky Settlements. To their surprise, Clark refused. "If a country isn't worth protecting, it isn't worth claiming!", he shouted. "If Virginia won't defend Kenducky, we will go elsewhere." - -- Clark got his powder and on his terms. A few weeks later, Clark and Jones were on hand to present their case to the Va. General Assembly. Also present was Col. Henderson, who was trying desperately to get recognition of his claim to the land he had purchased from the Cherokees. Again Clark and Jones prevailed and received the official sanction they sought. The Legislature passed an Act on 12/6/1776, which established the County of Kentucky out of the Western part of Fincastle County. Henderson's personal empire was doomed. Clark and Jones returned through Fort Pitt to pick up their powder. During their trip down the Ohio with the powder, they encountered frequent Indian activity. Fearing they might lose it, they were forced to hide it in several locations not far from Limestone. The two continued on to Harrodsburg with the good news. After much celebration, Jones led a party to get the much needed powder. From nowhere an ambush was sprung and he and 3 others were slain and the powder lost. As was often the case on the frontier, victory was often short and quickly replaced by another tragedy.

From: Pathfinders, Pioneers, & Patriots Danny Dixon
---------------------------------------------------

George Rogers Clark Memoir of Campaigns against the British posts northwest of the river Ohio, Part one

The introduction to the memoir and text of the memoir, which follows in nine parts, are quoted from Conquest of the Country Northwest of the River Ohio 1778-1783 and Life of Gen. George Rogers Clark by William Hayden English. The two volumes were published by The Bowen-Merrill Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, and Kansas City, Missouri, in 1897.

Clark and Mr. John Jones elected to go to the Virginia assembly.




 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  John Jones (1725 - 1773)
  Ann Slade Jones (1727 - ____)
 
 Spouse:
  Martha Wells Jones (1750 - ____)*
 
 Children:
  Wells Jones (1766 - 1835)*
  Wells Jones (1770 - 1835)*
 
 Sibling:
  John Jones (____ - 1817)*
  John Gabriel Jones (1752 - 1776)
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Unknown
 
Created by: Bobby and Carol Babin E...
Record added: Dec 28, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 32456375
 

R,I,P,
- Bobby and Carol Babin Estes
 Added: Dec. 28, 2008
 
 
 Advertisement

Privacy Statement and Terms of Service UPDATED