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 • Christ Church Burial Ground
 • Philadelphia
 • Philadelphia County
 • Pennsylvania
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James Horatio Watmough
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Birth: 1754
Halifax
Nova Scotia, Canada
Death: Jan. 23, 1812
Philadelphia
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA

His parents died young; he lived first with his Aunt Sarah Ellis Descamps, widow of Judge Deschamps of Halifax until his fourteenth year, at which time he was adopted by his mother's cousin Henry Hope, then the head of the eminent banking house of Hope & Co of Amsterdam, Holland. This Mr. Hope was a very wealthy man. He died in 1811 at his home in London...

Henry Hope educated his adoptee thoroughly in Amsterdam. It is said that it was Mr. Hope's intention to make James Horatio Watmough his heir, and that he wanted the boy to marry Henrietta Goddard, the eldest daughter of his only sister Harriet. The boy refused and wished to return to his homeland. Hope gave him plenty of money; he went to Halifax then on to Boston and Philadelphia towards the end of the War. With Hope's help, he then went to work for Cape Francais, a large mercantile house in the West Indies.

Watmough named his first son after Mr. Hope. He purchased a fine tract of land to which he gave the name "Hope Lodge." 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Anna Watmough (____ - 1827)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Christ Church Burial Ground
Philadelphia
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA
Plot: Section Q, Plot XXV
 
Maintained by: KGates
Originally Created by: DeLoss McKnight III
Record added: Jul 09, 2005
Find A Grave Memorial# 11324754
James Horatio Watmough
Added by: KGates
 
James Horatio Watmough
Cemetery Photo
Added by: William S. McDowell
 
 
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