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Dr Brantly Mercer Callaway
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Birth: Nov. 24, 1838
Wilkes County
Georgia, USA
Death: Sep. 22, 1902
Wilkes County
Georgia, USA

Rev. Dr. Callaway was a 3rd great-grandson of American Immigrant Peter Callaway. His Callaway Ancestry:

Peter Callaway = Elizabeth Johnson
John Callaway = Mary Gould
Edward Callaway = Elizabeth
John Callaway = Bethany Arnold
Rev. Enoch Callaway = Martha Reeves
Rev. Dr. Brantly Mercer Callaway

REV. DR. BRANTLY MERCER CALLAWAY married LUCY BROOKS HOWARD on January 11, 1859 near Greenville, Meriwether Co., GA, daughter of ROBERT GROVES HOWARD and MARY BROOKS GLENN. She was born November 1, 1837 in Oglethorpe Co., GA, and died January 15, 1915 in Wilkes Co., GA.

Children of BRANTLY CALLAWAY and LUCY HOWARD are:
i. ANNA CALLAWAY, b. July 9, 1860, Wilkes Co., GA; d. March 9, 1926, Augusta, Richmond Co., GA.
ii. Judge ENOCH HOWARD CALLAWAY, GA STATE SENATOR, b. July 19, 1862, Wilkes Co., GA; d. June 10, 1932, Augusta, Richmond Co., GA; m. MARY EUGENIA JONES, February 23, 1888, Newnan, Coweta Co., GA; b. October 6, 1864, Tuskegee, Macon Co., AL; d. December 3, 1901, Summerville (now part of Augusta), Richmond Co., GA.
iii. EDGAR ALLAN CALLAWAY, b. June 15, 1866, Wilkes Co., GA; d. April 10, 1945, of Derbyshire, Wilkes Co., GA; m. MARY EUGENIA "MAMIE" TURNER, December 30, 1888, Wilkes Co., GA; b. June 20, 1866, Wilkes Co., GA; d. March 2, 1929, Atlanta, Fulton Co., GA (of Derbyshire, Wilkes Co., GA).
iv. ELLEN CALLAWAY, b. April 9, 1868, Wilkes Co., GA; d. November 7, 1928, Augusta, Richmond Co., GA.
v. WILLIAM ROBERT CALLAWAY, b. September 14, 1870, Wilkes Co., GA; d. December 26, 1915, Clarkesville, Habersham Co., GA; m. JANE LESLIE HURST, November 12, 1901, Waynesboro, Burke Co., GA; b. September 24, 1877, Waynesboro, Burke Co., GA; d. October 6, 1949, Americus, Sumter Co., GA.
vi. BRANTLY MERCER "UNCLE BRANT" CALLAWAY II, b. January 30, 1879, Wilkes Co., GA; d. August 22, 1947, Washington, Wilkes Co., GA.
vii. TWIN SONS CALLAWAY, b. May 23, 1883, Wilkes Co., GA; d. May 23, 1883, Wilkes Co., GA.
_______
Rev. B. M. Callaway, D.D.
Sudden and Unexpected Death of this Distinguished Minister
from: The Washington Chronicle, Vol. XVII, No. 37, Monday, Sept. 22, 1902, p. 1:

When it was announced early Monday morning that Rev. B. M. Callaway was dead it was almost unbelievable. A number of Persons replied it must be a mistake. He was in town on Friday in his usual good health, chatting pleasantly with friends and looking after some business matters.
On Sunday he filled his regular appointment at Beaverdam church preach with unusually ability and administered the ordinance of Baptism.
Just after service he was suddenly seized with most acute pains in the region of his heart. Dr. Christian, who was present, gave him something to relieve him and he got in his buggy and drove home alone. On arriving there he stated that he had suffered excruciatingly on the way and was suffering greatly then.
Loving hands and tender hearts ministered to him and Dr. Christian was sent for. He continued to suffer very much, but by nine o'clock he was so greatly relieved that the doctor left, and he went to sleep.
Mrs. Callaway and their son, Mr. Edgar Callaway, were the only members of the family present. Just before one o'clock he was breathing naturally and rousing up slightly said he felt better. After a short interval his son noticed that he did not hear him breathe, and leaning tenderly over him found that life was extinct.
He had always enjoyed such robust health that his wife and son did not at all realize that death was so near.
Brantley [sic] Mercer Callaway first saw the light on the place where he died in November 1838, being nearly sixty-four years old when he breathed his last.
In early life he married Miss Lucy Howard, who survives him. The conjugal relations were never more beautifully illustrated than those which have characterized this wedded life throughout. As the writer well knows it always added new pleasures to life to visit this Christian home, and witness the devotion of husband and wife, and parents and children. We do not believe there was ever a sweeter home in all the world. It was made so by the tender love of each member of the family for the other.
We do not think that Wilkes county ever produced a man of greater force of character than Rev. B. M. Callaway. His word was his bond, he most scrupulous meeting the full requirements of every obligation in religious, social and business affairs.
He was in many respects one of the most remarkable ministers of the gospel that Georgia ever produced. for nearly forty-three years, covering his entire ministerial life, he had been pastor of Clark's Station church; and for thirty-three years he had been pastor at Sardis. For eighteen years he was pastor at Beaverdam church where he preached his last sermon before his Master, whom he delighted so to serve, called him to his eternal home with the people of God.
He had also served, Cloud's Creek, Indian Creek churches in Oglethorpe, and Rehoboth and Danburg in Wilkes. to the hearts and lives of all of these people he was linked by the strongest and tenderness ties. He made an impress for good on the lives of these people as well as on all with whom he came in contact, that will never be forgotten.
As a counselor in church affairs he was pre-eminent, and in this respect he attained to a position that few other ministers have ever reached.
For a number of years he had been chairman of the board of trustees of Mercer University and his value to that institution of learning is beyond computation. he gave liberally from his purse, but this is not to be compared to contributions from his head and heart.
He was a scholarly man and might have filled with distinction any position in church or state, but as he often said to the writer, his preference was to live out his life in the home where he was born and serve the churches around him.
We had known him intimately for a long number of years and we have never known him to fail to measure up to the full requirements of a minister of the gospel and of a citizen. We admired him and loved him as we have few other men. some years ago he was made a Doctor of Divinity. The first time we met him after that he said to us "Don't you ever call me doctor, just address me as you always have," the writer feels that he has sustained a great personal loss in the death of Rev. B. M. Callaway.
The Christian world, the Baptist church, Georgia and Wilkes county have sustained a loss that will be deeply felt and for many years to come.
But after all, the deepest and most irreparable loss is to the family circle where as tender ties as ever bound human beings together in this world, not only existed, but flourished in all their beauty.
The children are Judge E. H. Callaway of Augusta, Mr. E. A. Callaway, W. R. Callaway, esq., of Waynesboro, B. M. Callaway, Jr., and Misses Anna and Ellen Callaway.
The funeral services will take place at the residence on Wednesday at noon, and the burial will be in the family burying ground.
___________________
REV. BRANTLEY [sic] M. CALLOWAY PASSES AWAY
SUDDEN DEATH OF THE VENERABLE FATHER OF HON. E. H. CALLOWAY
He Died at His Home in Wilkes Co., Near Washington, Sunday Evening - He Was in Good Health Sunday and, as Usual, Conducted Religious Exercises - The Funeral Occurs Tomorrow - He Was a Prominent Baptist Divine and Was President of the Board of Trustees of Mercer University.
from: The Augusta Chronicle, Augusta, Georgia, Tuesday, September 23, 1902, p. 8A:

News of the sudden death of Rev. Brantley [sic] M. Callaway, father of E. H. Callaway, Esq., of Augusta, reached the city yesterday.
The death occurred Sunday at the home of the well-known divine, near Washington, Ga. Judge Callaway left Augusta yesterday morning for Washington.
Dr. Callaway was a prominent Georgian. He was well known and beloved and his death is lamented throughout the state. In his immediate neighborhood - where he was best known - he was idolized.
He was an able and gifted man, a God-fearing Christian, a charitable, true gentleman.
He was a prominent Baptist minister and was president of the board of trustees of Mercer university. He gave much in charity and many have felt the beneficence of his liberality.
Dr. Callaway had been in excellent health during the summer. He conducted religious services as usual Sunday, preaching an able sermon and administering baptism to quite a number of persons. He did not complain in any way. During the evening he experienced a sudden attack of apoplexy and expired in a short time.
Dr. Callaway was in his sixtieth year. His beloved wife survives him, and he is also survived by two daughters and six sons: E. H. Callaway of Augusta; W. R. Callaway of Waynesboro and Edgar and Brantley Callaway of Wilkes county, and Miss Ella Callaway and Miss Anna Callaway.
The funeral will occur tomorrow, Wednesday, morning. The interment will be in the family burying ground, near the home of the deceased, in Wilkes county.
The sudden death of this splendid gentleman is a sad blow to his family, for few husbands and fathers were so well beloved as he.
___________________
FUNERAL TODAY
Brief Sketch of the Life of Rev. Brantley [sic] Mercer Calloway, The Augusta Chronicle, Augusta, GA, "Wednesday, September 24, 1902, p. 8A:

The funeral of Rev. Brantley [sic] M.. Callaway, the father of Judge E. H. Callaway, will occur in Wilkes county this morning. The interment will take place in the family burying ground, near the late residence of the deceased.
News of the sudden death of the distinguished divine was given in the Chronicle yesterday. Following is a brief sketch of the deceased:
Brantley Mercer Callaway was born in Wilkes county, Georgia November 24, 1838, and was the youngest son of the late Rev. Enock [Enoch, sic] Callaway. His pious parents felt a deep interest in the spiritual welfare of their large household, and adopted the course which would lead them in early life to the contemplation of eternal things.
Soon after reaching the age of 12 years, he was baptized by his father into the fellowship of Sardis church, Wilkes county, near where his father then resided. His father was at that time pastor of the church.
His early school advantages were favorable, as he was, most of the time, under the tutorship of an excellent instructor, Rev. Thomas N. Rhodes, until prepared to enter the junior class of Mercer university, at Penfield, in 1856. After pursuing the studies of the junior year, he spent two years in teaching school. In 1859 he married Miss Lucy B. Howard, of Meriwether county, by whom he has several children. In 1858, Sardis church, with which he first united, licensed him to preach the gospel, and after exercising his gift for more than a year, at the request of Clark's station church, Sardis church called him to ordination, which ceremony was performed by Revs. P. P. Butler and J. B. Butler. His connection with Clark's station church began in 1860, and has continued without intermission to this date.
He had been pastor of Bethany church, Oglethorpe county, for many years, of Sardis church for a number of years, and of Cloud's Creek church for several years, and at the time of his death he was supplying these churches. He supplied the church at Fishing Creek in 1860-61 and Lincolnton church in 1867-8-9.
He has been prominent for a number of years in the Georgia Baptist convention.
At the time of his death he was president of the board of trustees of Mercer university and also a member of the board of trustees of Monroe Female college at Monroe, and the Georgia Baptist Orphans Home at Hapeville.
___________________
Rev. B. M. Callaway
from: The Washington Chronicle, Vol. XVII, No. 38, Monday, Sept. 29, 1902, p. 2:

Such touching tributes have appeared in both our county papers to the memory of Dr. Callaway that I hesitate to write at all, but there are some characteristics of this honored citizen that have not been alluded to, that I wish briefly to refer to them.
Whilst adhering closely to the traditional doctrines of his church, rival systems of doctrine did not provoke jealously, or incur his implacable hatred. Far from it. He was broad, liberal minded, catholic in spirit.
Dr. Callaway was a man of fine endowments, and his vigorous mind was well cultured and he could afford to be fraternal and liberal in spirit. My father was an honored local Methodist minister, and often at Dr. Callaway's request would visit his churches and preach for him. They were close personal friends and my father said before he died, that Brantley [Brantly sic], as he familiarly called him, was one of the most compassionate men he ever associated with. Preaching at Sardis once by request of Mr. Callaway, he was made moderator of the church conference. What a beautiful manifestation of the Christian spirit. This gifted brother, friend and citizen stood out boldly for the truth and for the right principles of living.
A year or two ago when the Mormon elders were prancing over the county trying to inculcate their nefarious and hellish doctrine into our people, Dr. Callaway denounced them fearlessly from his pulpit and ably exposed their miserable doctrines in our county papers. His devotion to the work of the church was indeed beautiful. Many years ago this writer was a member of a committee of Alliancemen that suggested his name and that of Judge Hardeman as suitable candidates for the lower house of the general assembly. He intimated a willingness to accept, but going home and conferring with some members of his church, they suggested that such a course might impair his great usefulness as an ordained minister, and her promptly declined the proffered honor.
It has been said that in the home you will see manifested the true characteristics of a man. If this be true how respondent the virtues of this honored and honorable citizen.
After several invitations it was the writer's good fortune to spend the night with him last June. He carried me through the different apartments of his splendid home and showed me his full library so replete with the latest and best books. I never spent a more delightful evening, and memory will ever revert with pleasure to this visit.
This useful minister and gifted citizen has passed away in the meridian of his usefulness and we may never see his like again, but let us thank God for his exalted worth.
S. A. Wootten
___________________
BRANTLY MERCER CALLAWAY
from: History of the Baptist Denomination in Georgia: With Biographical Compendium and Portrait Gallery of Baptist Ministers and Other Georgia Baptists, by Samuel Boykin (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1976 Reprint of 1881 ed.), pp. 86-87:

Among the many worth and efficient servants of the Lord Jesus now laboring in the bound of the old Georgia Association, Rev. BRANTLY MERCER CALLAWAY deserves no obscure place.
He was born in Wilkes county, Georgia, November 24th, 1838, and is the youngest son of Rev. Enoch Callaway. His pious parents felt a deep interest in the spiritual welfare of their large household, and adopted the course which would lead them in early life to the contemplation of eternal things. His mother, who survived her husband several years, lived with this son and watched with intense interest his entrance on the work of the ministry and his progress in it. When very young his heart was impressed with the exceeding sinfulness of sin; and conscious of his state by nature, lost in sin and alienated from god, he cast himself with all his guilt on divine mercy, and was enabled through pardoning love, to rejoice in Christ as the Saviour. this occurred when he was about twelve years of age, and very soon after, on a profession of faith, he was baptized by his father into the fellowship of Sardis church, Wilkes county, near where his father then resided, and where the subject of this sketch now resides. His father was at that time pastor of the church.
His early school advantages were favorable, as he was, most of the time, under the tutorship of that most excellent instructor, Rev. Thomas N. Rhodes, until prepared to enter the Junior class of Mercer University, at Penfield, in 1856. After pursuing the studies of the Junior year, he spent two years in teaching school. In 1859 he formed the marriage relation with Miss Lucy B. Howard, of Meriwether county, Georgia, a most devotedly pious woman, by whom he has several interesting children. In 1858, Sardis church, with which he first united, licensed him to preach the Gospel; and after exercising his gift for more than a year, at the request of Clark's Station church, Sardis church called him to ordination, which ceremony was performed by Revs. P. P. Butler and J. B. Butler. His connection with Clark's Station church began in 1860, and has continued without intermission to this date.
He has been pastor of Bethany church, Oglethorpe county, for eighteen years, of Sardis church for ten years, and of Cloud's Creek church for three, and is now supplying these churches. He supplied the church at Fishing Creek in 1860-1, and Lincolnton church in 1867-8-9.
Since his ordination he has unremittingly given himself to the work of the ministry. He is a successful planter, and manages all his temporal affairs with wisdom, but none of these things are ever allowed to interfere with his regular ministerial engagements. He enforces on his churches the Scriptural obligation to sustain the ministry, and the responsibility binding each member to give of his substance to sustain the cause of Christ at home and in heathen lands.
He is held in Highest esteem by his churches for his fidelity, his soundness in doctrine, the ability with which he enforces the teachings of the bible, and the bold and fearless manner with which he urges the practical duties of the gospel. At the Georgia Baptist convention, as well as the Georgia Association, of which he is generally a member, he is every ready to give his vote and personal influence to any proposition that will advance the cause of the Redeemer.
___________________
The Family of Rev. Brantly M. Callaway, D.D.
from: An Account of the John Callaway Family and Home in Wilkes Co., GA by Brantly Mercer Callaway, II (Columbus, GA: Callaway Family Association, 1983), pp. 32-36a:

Brantly Mercer Callaway, the youngest son of Rev. Enoch Callaway, having received his early education in schools taught by his brother-in-law, Rev. Thomas N. Rhodes, near his home at Centerville, Wilkes Co., 5 miles distance, and by his brother, Abner Reeves Callaway, at Greenville, Georgia, completed the studies of the Junior class at Mercer university in Penfield, Georgia, in 1857. He taught school for one year near his home in the community of the Redding Sims, and the Wiley P. Hill homes. In 1858 he became principal of the school at Gainesville, Georgia. His father having been stricken with a fatal illness, he returned to his home in 1859 where he resided the remainder of his own life.
Rev. Enoch Callaway had bequeathed a life interest in one-half of his plantation to his widow, and the other half- about one thousand acres -- to Brantly M. Callaway, who managed his Mother's business affairs as long thereafter as she lived.
In 1855 he had lived in the home of his brother, Rev. Abner Reeves Callaway in Greenville, Georgia, while attending school there. Lucy Brooks Howard, a sister of Mrs. Abner R. Callaway, whose Mother had died in Oglethorpe Co., GA also lived in this home.
Lucy Howard and Brantly Callaway came to love each other and after he had attended college one year and had taught school one year, they were married in Greenville, Georgia, January 11, 1859, while he was principal of the school at Gainesville, Georgia.
Upon returning to Wilkes County in the summer of 1859 on account of his father's illness and to assist in the management of the plantation, they lived in a small frame house near the road about two hundred yards southeast of his father's house. after a few years they moved into the house with his Mother, where they continued to reside after her death, so long as each of them lived.
The ordination of Brantly M. Callaway as a Baptist minister was called by Clarks Station Baptist Church in 1860, (he was ordained at Sardis Church which he served the remainder of his life -- forty-three years.)
He was a man of intelligency and integrity, and with study and energy became one of the influential preachers and pastors of his time. Sound business judgment and a consciousness of civic responsibility mad him widely useful as a citizen and leader. "With a ministry limited to country churches, and to a single association, his interest and influence were state-wide, and hardly surpassed or equaled by any minister of his time," Vol. 1, PP. 133-4 "History of Ga. baptists" by B. D. Ragsdale.
In appearance he was about five feet nine inches tall, weighing slightly more than two hundred pounds, with strong features and pleasing personality. His clarity of thought and judgment made him notable in any gathering.
The plantation was the principal source of income for the family since the country churches were unable to pay much for the services of their pastors. It is probable he did not receive in any year more than $750 from his churches, and commonly not that much. But as the management of the plantation was practical and most of the supplies were produced on it, the family lived in reasonable economic comfort.
He superintended the wage farm near the residence and supervised the tenets -- riding horseback farther away. But this duty did not prevent studious preparations for sermons and addresses, nor did he neglect denominational and civic meetings in which he took part.
Rev. Brantly M. Callaway was pastor of the following Baptist Churches, all being in the Georgia Baptist Association, for the years given.
Clarks Station1860-1902
Fishing Creek1860-1862
Lincolnton1867-1869
Sardis1870-1902
Beaverdam1884-1902
Danburg1892-1902
Bethany, Sarepta Association1858-1881
Clouds Creek ""1876-1885
Rev. Brantly Mercer Callaway was elected by the Georgia Baptist Convention as a Trustee of Mercer University 1881-1902. He was president of the Board of Trustees 1896-1902. In recognition of his ability and service Mercer University conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 1892.
He was a Trustee of Monroe Female (Bessie Tift) College 1898-1902, and Trustee of the Georgia Baptist Orphan's Home 1899-1902, and was Vice-President of the Georgia Baptist Convention in ____. (He made note in outside column to rewrite above).
He rendered varied and useful service on many of the committees of the churches, the association and the State Convention of the Baptist denomination throughout his life; and took active part in the civic affairs of his county.
There is a sketch of the Life of Rev. B. M. Callaway, D.D. in "The Encyclopedia of Georgia" Vol. 1. P. 295, by ex-Governor Allen D. Candler; and many references to him in "The Story of Georgia Baptist," by B. D. Ragsdale....
___________
History of Wilkes County 1865 to 1875
from: The History of Wilkes Co., GA by Robert M. Willingham, Jr., (Washington, GA: Wilkes Publishing Co., 2002), p. 199:

Rev. Brantley [sic] M. Callaway, who served Clark's Station, Sardis, and Beaverdam Baptist Churches from the War years to the turn of the century, set out with missionary zeal to assist several black churches in their formative years. In 1871 he helped organize White Rock Baptist Church, ordained Bob Cofer, Frank Irvin, and John Stokes as the first deacons, and served as pastor until Rev. Lewis Williams assumed those responsibilities. Rev. Callaway helped to found Pleasant Grove Baptist Church and participated in the organizational ceremony on 21 June 1874, with the church's first pastor, Rev. Silas L. Johnson. First services were held in a log cabin with a homemade altar, benches, and chairs on land given the previous years by Tom Willis.
_____________
History of Wilkes County 1876 to 1895
from: The History of Wilkes Co., GA by Robert M. Willingham, Jr., (Washington, GA: Wilkes Publishing Co., 2002), p. 242:

County Baptist churches continued to be social as well as spiritual centers for their various communities. Largest in size of congregation were Sardis and Rehoboth with both having twice as many members as Washington Baptist Church in 1880. Sardis' August revivals were always well-attended and the church's pastor, Rev. Brantley M. Callaway, was a true patriarch among the local ministry. His father Enoch also having served as pastor of Sardis, there was a tradition that for fifty years the horse of a Callaway preacher was tied on meeting days to the limb of a certain hickory tree in the Sardis churchyard. In 1889 a ten-day meeting at Sardis closed with great success through the efforts of Rev. Callaway and Revs. W. M. Harris and J. W. Binns of Washington. The church was thoroughly renovated in 1877 and the north side addition, which had been added in 1857 for slave members, was removed. Long-time superintendent of the successful Sunday School was W. R. Callaway.
_________
History of Wilkes County 1876 to 1895
from: The History of Wilkes Co., GA by Robert M. Willingham, Jr., (Washington, GA: Wilkes Publishing Co., 2002), p. 243:

In 1879 Beaverdam Baptist Church had 117 white and 25 black members. Rev. T.A. Nash, who had accepted the call to the church in 1871, remained until 1884. During his ministry in 1881 a school house was built. A tradition of the church was the "protracted meeting" during the summer. One particular revival in August 1881 provided messages by Rev. Nash, Rev. John R. Young, and Rev. William Green and saw 24 new members received by the church. When Rev. Nash resigned in 1884, Rev. Brantley M. Callaway was hired at a salary of $150 per year. A new baptismal pool was placed near Beaverdam Spring in 1890 through the efforts of a committee of Thomas Cofer, W.T. Gunn, and William Maxwell and in 1895 an organ was purchased with Willie Evans named church organist.
Rev. Callaway was one of the most tireless workers in the Baptist denomination. The son of Rev. Enoch Callaway, he was born in 1838 in Wilkes County and lived virtually his entire life on the family plantation serving neighboring churches. He was licensed and ordained at Sardis and attended Mercer University at Penfield. After a brief stint teaching school, he accepted a call to Clark's Station Baptist Church in 1860 where he would remain until his death 42 years later. He also held pastorates at Sardis (1870-1902), Beaverdam (1884-1902), Rehoboth, Danburg, and Fishing Creek as well as Lincolnton Baptist and two churches in Oglethorpe County, Cloud's Creek and Indian Creek. Married to Lucy B. Howard, he was father of six children and also successfully ran the operation of the farm. From 1896 until his death, he was president of the Board of Trustees of mercer University and was also a trustee of Monroe Female College and the Georgia Baptist Orphan Home. 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Enoch Callaway (1792 - 1859)
  Martha Reeves Callaway (1796 - 1879)
 
 Spouse:
  Lucy Brooks Howard Callaway (1837 - 1915)*
 
 Children:
  Anna Callaway (1860 - 1926)*
  Enoch Howard Callaway (1862 - 1932)*
  Edgar Allan Callaway (1866 - 1945)*
  Ellen Callaway (1868 - 1928)*
  William Robert Callaway (1870 - 1915)*
  Brantly Mercer Callaway (1879 - 1947)*
  Twin Boys Callaway (1883 - 1883)*
 
 Siblings:
  John R. Callaway (1814 - 1826)*
  Sally Callaway (1816 - 1821)*
  William Reeves Callaway (1820 - 1895)*
  Reuben Strozier Callaway (1822 - 1853)*
  Mary Bethany Callaway Geer (1825 - 1908)*
  Sarah Ann Callaway Rhodes (1828 - 1912)*
  Enoch G. Callaway (1830 - 1843)*
  Abner Reeves Callaway (1832 - 1898)*
  Sanders Callaway (1834 - 1835)*
  Eliza Ann Callaway Cheney (1836 - 1895)*
  Brantly Mercer Callaway (1838 - 1902)
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Callaway Family Cemetery
Rayle
Wilkes County
Georgia, USA
 
Maintained by: Samuel Taylor Geer
Originally Created by: Helen Cameron
Record added: Jul 12, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 39368328
Dr Brantly Mercer Callaway
Added by: Samuel Taylor Geer
 
Dr Brantly Mercer Callaway
Added by: Howard Burough
 
Dr Brantly Mercer Callaway
Added by: Howard Burough
 
 
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Be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath; for man's wrath does not work God's righteousness. James 1
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 Added: May. 11, 2013

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 Added: Feb. 23, 2013

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 Added: Nov. 20, 2009
 
 
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