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Find all Cookworthys in:
 • St Andrew Churchyard (Defunct)
 • Plymouth
 • Plymouth Unitary Authority
 • Devon
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William Cookworthy
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Birth: Apr. 12, 1705
Death: Oct. 17, 1780
Plymouth
Devon, England

William Cookworthy was the man who founded the China Clay industry in Cornwall and Devon. He was born in Kingsbridge, his parents were Quakers, father William and mother Edith nee Debell,who married in 1704. They had seven children. William was the eldest His father was a weaver who died when he was thirteen, he was offered an apprenticeship by two Quaker brothers of the name of Bevan who were chemists in London. The Bevans set him up in business in Plymouth where he prospered . He married Sarah Berry in 1735 and they had five daughters.
He visited China interested in porcelain which China exported to England. On his return to Devon and Cornwall he noticed that around St Austell the hills resembled those in China from which China clay was mined. He found a way to make porcelain and in 1768 he opened a factory in Plymouth to make it.
Cookworthy helped John Smeaton with the development of hydraulic lime which made possible the building of the third Eddystone lighthouse. He also advised naval officers that fresh fruit and vegetables could prevent scurvey on ships.
 
 
Burial:
St Andrew Churchyard (Defunct)
Plymouth
Plymouth Unitary Authority
Devon, England
 
Created by: David Martin
Record added: Nov 21, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 101091947
William Cookworthy
Added by: David Martin
 
 
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Christ also has suffered for you, leaving you a model that you should follow in his steps:who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth. 1 Peter 2
- David Martin
 Added: Nov. 21, 2012
 
 
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