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William Goodlett
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Birth: Aug. 20, 1760
Frederick County
Virginia, USA
Death: Jun. 16, 1836
Greenville County
South Carolina, USA

On October 7, 1780 the foundation that would forever change the world was established. Fewer than one thousand American Heroes, through skill, luck, and the leadership of cunning strategists, defeated Patrick Ferguson, a brilliant star of the British military might. William Goodlett, DAR Ancestor Number A046433, was one of the Heroes who fought in the Battle of King's Mountain.

His participation in the Battle of King's Mountain was documented by W8857, his Application for Revolutionary War Pension which he commenced his widow, Nancy Hooper Goodlett, completed. The application was full of detail and was transcribed by Will Graves.

(Parenthetically, historians, genealogists, and descendants owe thanks to Will Graves for his hours spent transcribing the pension applications of American Revolution veterans. These papers were fragile and difficult to read, so this was a most difficult task, but so many people benefit from his efforts. Thank you, Will Graves.)

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Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements Pension App of William Goodlettt W8857 Nancy fn71SC

Transcribed by Will Graves 6/10/2006 supp’d 9/20/09

State of South Carolina, Greenville District

On this seventeenth day of September in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and thirty two, personally appeared before me one of the Justices assigned to keep the peace in the District of Greenville aforesaid, William Goodlettt Esquire a resident citizen of Greenville District in the State of South Carolina aged Seventy two years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th, 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers, and served as herein stated:

That he entered into the Service as a volunteer in Spartanburg District in the State of South Carolina which was then his place of residence in the year 1776 in which service be continued til the year 1780, commanded during this period by different officers, Viz: Capt. John McElhekany (sic, McElhaney), Capt. William Moore, Capt. John Collins and Col. John Thomas Senior of Spartanburg.

That during the whole of this period he was actively engaged against the Indians and Tories who were ranging the State with a relentless hand, and was in some engagements with the British the first at Musgrove's Mills on Spartanburg District in this State where he was commanded by Capt. John Collins and Col. Williamson from Georgia and others which occurred in 1780 that he was in the battle at Kings Mountain in this State on the 6th Oct. 1780 commanded by the said Capt. Collins, and by one Col. Williams of Laurens District in this State, that he was at Dunlap's Defeat, the battle of Blackstocks and Cowpens and at the Siege of Augusta and in many other skirmishes and foraging engagements; that he received from His Excellency Benjamin Guerard Esq. Governor and Commander in Chief in and over the State of South Carolina a commission as first lieutenant of the Sixth Company of Spartanburg militia commanded by Col. Benj. Roebuck dated the 19th May 1783 but to take rank from the 15th Sept. 1781 which commission accompanies this declaration; that he has no other documentary evidence of his service, or discharge,; that there is no person convenient by whom he could prove his said services; that he is now and has been for upwards of twenty years confined to his house unable to walk or help himself, having been severely afflicted and deformed by Consumption and consequently utterly unable to travel fourteen miles to Court to make this declaration;

that he was born in Frederick County State of Virginia on the 21st August 1760; moved to Spartanburg S. C. at fourteen years of age and in June 1776 entered the Service as before stated and served as first lieutenant from the 15th Sept. 1781 till Dec. 1783.

The officers in command at Kings Mountain were Cols Shelby, Campbell, Sevier, Williams & Cleveland; at Dunlap's Defeat, Col. Williams of Georgia; at the battle of the Cowpens, Genl. Morgan, Cols. Howard & Roebuck; and at the Siege of Augusta he was commanded by Capt. Boykin.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of the Agency of any State. That in 1787 he moved to Greenville District where he has resided ever since.

S/ William Goodlettt, X his mark

Sworn to and subscribed before me. S/ Robert Cox, J. P.

[David Blyth, a clergyman, and R. S. C. Foster gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

State of South Carolina, Greenville District

On this 10th day of October A.D. 1832 personally came George Salmon1
Personally came before me the Subscribing Justice John Young Esquire in open Court, and being duly sworn declares on oath that he was well acquainted with William Goodlettt Esquire who has made his declaration before Robert Cox JP for a Pension, during the Revolutionary War that he entered the Service of the United States immediately after Charleston South Carolina was taken by the British, and continued in active Service very nearly the whole war, being very active, bold & valorous, often saw him in Service during the War, that he (said Goodlettt) was in the battle at Augusta Georgia thinks he was at Ferguson's defeat, & at the battle at the Cowpens; that after the war he settled in Greenville District (having served at the least 4 or 5 years in the service of the United States) where he has resided ever since and has been confined many years to his House by afflictions, by rheumatism, and that he has at all times and on all occasions proved himself a friend to his Country and maintained in the War & since and unimpeachable character for honesty and integrity and is now in his old age sorely afflicted: And this deponent believes if any man deserves the gratitude and aid of his Country it is William Goodlettt Esquire aforesaid for he stood by her in the hour of peril.

S/ J. McDaniel, C. C. P.
S/ Geo. Salmon


State of South Carolina, Greenville District

On this 6th day of July in the year of our Lord 1833, personally appeared before me, William Goodlettt Esquire, a resident citizen of Greenville District in the State of South Carolina aged 72 years the 20th day of last August, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

That he was born in Frederick County in the State of Virginia on the 20th day of August 1760, and at the age of 14 he removed to Spartanburg District in the State of South Carolina, and in the month of June 1776 entered the service of the United States in the State of South Carolina as a volunteer in the company commanded by Capt. John McElhaney
Esquire of Greenville District aged as he says 71 years and being by me duly Sworn on his oath doth declare that he is now and has for many years been well acquainted with William Goodlettt Esquire of said District who has made his Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed the 7th of June 1832: that he knew him before the year 1776 and ever since;

that in the year 1776 the said Goodlettt was in the Service of his Country and Col. John Thomas Senior's Regiment; that this Declarant was with him in many scouts, an active & energetic Soldier always acting as a volunteer;

That the said Goodlettt continued constantly on the Service against the Indians and Tories which were very troublesome at that time; that he at one time belonged to Col. Roebuck's Regiment

That the said Goodlettt entered the Service before this Deponent, and this Deponent Served 2 years and 6 months towards the close of the War and the said Goodlettt was in the Service the whole of that time.

That the said Goodlettt was always esteemed an active, faithful Soldier, acting on all occasions as a volunteer. And has since the war supported a high character for probity, integrity and private worth and has been grievously afflicted with the Rheumatism, long confined to his house and badly deformed not yet.

Sworn to and subscribed to before me the 8 July 1833
S/ William Choice
S/ John Young


State of South Carolina, Greenville District

1 George Salmon W9640
2 John Young W1976

which belonged to Col. John Thomas Senior's Regiment, under the command of General Williamson, was stationed at Prince’s Fort in Spartanburg for some months defending that Section of the Country from the outrages of the Indians and ravages of the Tories to Princes Fort was abandoned in the forces moved to Wood’s Fort.

There he joined Capt. William Wood’s Company, and was kept as a defensive force and guard for the Fort from the latter end of the year 1776 till 1779 and during this period he was in active Service against the Tories and Indians who were frequently committing depredations in that part of the State and the upper part of North Carolina; that in this time he went to the last named State and performed many Services in subduing and repelling the common enemy which were annoying the Citizens:

That in the year 1780 he joined Capt. John Collins’ Company, in the Regiment commanded by Col. John Thomas Junior and was in the Battle at Musgrove's Mills in August 1780: That in June previous he was in a Battle in Spartanburg against the British and Tories, and continued in the Service, and was in the Battle fought at King's Mountain on the line between this State in North Carolina, commanded by the said Capt. John Collins. In this engagement the South Carolina Troops were commanded by Col. Williams who was wounded and died the next day, the North Carolina Troops by Col. Cleveland and the balance by Colonels Campbell, Shelby and Sevier. The Battle resulted in the defeat and death of Col. Ferguson and victory for the American arms.

That in November 1780 he was in an engagement at Blackstocks in Spartanburg Commanded by the said Capt. Collins and Col. John Thomas Junior in which General Sumter commanded and was wounded. After of which this applicant was attached to Col. Benjamin Roebuck's Regiment under the command of General Andrew Pickens who joined General Morgan at Grindal Shoals on Pacolet River; That he was in the Battle of the Cowpens on the 18th day of January 1781 where General Morgan and Col. Howard commanded the regulars and General Pickens assisted by the Colonels Roebuck and Brannon [sic, Thomas Brandon] the Militia: that he was in several other engagements of less importance, one at Mudlick Laurens District, at Dunlap's defeat in Abbeville, at Briar Creek Bridge in Burke County in the State of Georgia:

That in June in the year 1782 he was at the taking of Col. Grayson’s [sic, Grierson's] Fort in Augusta Georgia, and in July or August following he was at the taking of Col. Brown's Fort at the same place, commanded by Capt. Boykin. In December 1782 he returned to South Carolina and in 1783 under the command of Major John Ford he marched and joined General Greene's Army then stationed at Rantoll’s Bridge on Ashley River in South Carolina, that he remained 6 weeks, and was then ordered up the Country --

That he continued in the public Service of his Country until within a few days of Christmas 1783 when he returned home and quit the Service having been actively and almost incessantly engaged in the service of his Country from the month of June 1776 till December 1783 a period of 7 years and 6 months, Sacrifice in during this time, with the exception of 2 months, to go and return from Virginia, his individual interest to the cause of his Country, and Serve throughout as a volunteer:

That he received from his Excellency Benjamin Guerard Esquire Gov. of South Carolina a Commission as first Lieut. of the 6th Company of Spartanburg Militia commanded by Col. Benjamin Roebuck dated the 19th May 1783 but to take rank from the 15th of September 1781; that he commanded and discharged the duties of first Lieut. from the 15th of September 1781 till December 1783 which commission accompanies this declaration as evidence of his said

Services: That he never received any regular Discharge nor has he any other documentary evidence of his said Services of a band of what is herewith Submitted. That he presents all the evidence of his Services that he has been able to procure: That in the year 1787 he removed to this District where he has resided ever since and for upwards of 20 years of the time has been confined to his House, having been and is sorely afflicted with, and deformed by Rheumatism, unable to walk or help himself and consequently unable to travel 14 miles to Court to make this declaration.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of the Agency of any State.

Sworn and Subscribed to before me the day and year first aforesaid. S/ William Choice, Commr & Register
S/ William Goodlettt, X his mark

In Equity & J. Q. [Leroy McWhorter, a clergyman, and Robert Cox gave the standard supporting affidavit.]

State of South Carolina, Greenville District

Personally came William Goodlettt before me the Subscribing Justice, and being duly sworn makes oath that in consequence of old age and the loss of memory he cannot state his services as particularly as he otherwise might but to the best of his recollection he served not less than the periods mentioned below and in the capacity stated.

He first entered the service of the United States on the last day of June or the first day of July 1776 under the command of Captain John McEllanhany [sic, John McElhaney] and in the Regiment commanded by Colonel John Thomas Senior.

He entered the service as a volunteer and served 6 months. The company to which he belonged was first stationed at Princes Fort in Spartanburg District. They remained there until the last of September, when the Fort was abandoned and the troops were employed in ranging the country in guarding the frontiers from the Indians & Tories until the last of December 1776. He served this tour 6 months in his services were of arduous and active nature 3 months of the tour he was stationed in Princes Fort - - 3 months in active duty in the field.

He then entered the service in the company of Captain William Wood and continued with Captain Wood from the first of January 1777 until the close of the year 1779. He was a portion of this time in garrisoning at Woods Fort, but for the greater portion was spent in active service in scouring the country & skirmishing with the Tories & guarding the frontiers from the Indians.

He made frequent excursions into the Indian Nation, into North Carolina in search of the Tories &c during this time he was called upon to pursue a Tory Colonel Moore who came from North Carolina and was marching to Georgia. The company with which this applicant was then serving pursued this Colonel Moore from Abbeville but were unable to overtake him or his troops. He was not during the whole of these 2 years engaged in any civil pursuit or employment whatever. He was constantly and actively engaged in the defense of his Country.

He again entered the service of the United States, as a Volunteer, [indecipherable word] the first of the year 1780, under the command of Captain John Collins and in the Regiment of Colonel John Thomas Junior. He was marched to York District under the above named officers and thence to Musgrove's Mill and was in the battle at that place in August under Captain Collins and Colonel Thomas & Colonel Williams. This battle was fought early in the morning and a great number of prisoners were taken by the American Army. This applicant was detached, with the company to which he belonged, to guard those prisoners into South Carolina. He went with them into Rutherford where they were released to other troops.

Thence they returned to Spartanburg and was in a battle at Rich Hills. After this battle they marched into North Carolina in pursuit of Ferguson under the command of Colonel Williams. They were joined by the forces under the command of Colonels Cleveland, Shelby, Sevier & Campbell. They came up with Ferguson at King's Mountain on the 7th of October 1780 in the battle ensued in the evening of that day. It was finished just as the sun was going down and resulted in the death of Ferguson and total capture of his forces. Colonel Williams was wounded in this battle and died the next day.

After this victory the South Carolina troops marched back to Spartanburg and this affiant was in the battle at Watkins House about the first of November. Thence they marched to join General Sumpter's [sic, Thomas Sumter's] Army, and was in the battle at Blackstocks towards the last of November. In this battle General Sumter was wounded.

From thence he was marched to Grindal Shoals on Pacolet [River] under the command of Collins & Thomas and joined the Army of General Morgan at that place. The company to which this applicant belonged was sent by General Morgan as a scout to the Saluda and returned. It was about the first of December when they joined Morgan and continued with him until they marched to the Cowpens, where the engagement took place on the 18th of January 1781. This affiant was in the battle under the command of Captain Collins in the Regiment of Colonel Roebuck and under the command of General Pickens. The battle was fought by Morgan & Howard. It commenced early in the morning and resulted in the defeat of Tarleton.

After the battle was over the company to which this applicant along was mounted and went in pursuit of Tarleton under the command of Colonel Washington. They pursued on towards Lord Cornwallis's camp & then returned to the Cowpens. But General Morgan had marched on towards North Carolina. They followed into Rutherford and thence marched back into South Carolina and was at the battle of Mud Licks [sic, Mudlick] in Laurens district under the command of Colonel White. This battle was fought with the Tories under the command of Cunningham in February 1781.

After this battle they were ordered to Georgia and on their way fell in with Captain Dunlap and defeated him near Long Cane -- took a parcel of prisoners and returned with them into Rutherford & thence marched back to Spartanburg.

This applicant was then transferred to the company commanded by Captain Boykin and was marched to Georgia under the command of Colonel Williamson. He was in the battle at Briar Creek Bridge under the command of Colonel Dunn in March 1781. He was detached as a scout, & from thence marched to Augusta under the command of Colonel Clark [sic, Elijah Clarke]. He was at the taking of Grayson's Fort [sic, Grierson's Fort]. Then they took Brown's Fort and Brown himself surrendered towards the last of August.

On 15 September 1781 this applicant was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant in the Company of Captain Boykin. He went from Augusta after the surrender of Brown towards the Ogeechee River under the command of Colonel Dunn as Lieutenant of a mounted Corps in search of the Tories camps. They were found & broken up. They then returned to Augusta & from thence marched into South Carolina -- and returned home at the close of December 1781 -- having been just two years since the last attached himself to the American Army, and during this time he was in the battles of "Musgrove Mills," "Rich Hills," "King's Mountain," "Blackstocks," "Cowpens," "Mudlick," "Long Cane," "Briar Creek Bridge," & the "Siege of Augusta."

His services were of the most active arduous and perilous time. He devoted himself wholly and solely to the cause of his Country. He neither wished nor would take peace until the peace of his Country was established in her independence as a nation.

In July 1782 he was called upon to march with his company of which he then had command as first Lieut., to join General Greene's Army on Ashley River near Rantall’s [Rantowles?] Bridge. He marched under the command of Major John Ford & joined the Army under Greene. He remained with it 6 weeks and was ordered home – having been gone not less than 6 weeks. He served this tour as a Lieut. and was actually acting as commander of the Company.

On his return home he was employed in search of the Indians and Tories who had taken Taimerson’s [?] Fort. He was sent into the Indian Nation and was engaged in scouring the front tears of this State until 22 December 1782 -- when he left the service.

In all it will be seen that he was constantly and most actively employed greatly over 2 years as a private and that he served 8 months and one half as a Lieutenant in the Army of the United States and for such services he claims a pension. This applicant here with transmits his commission as Lieut. from which it will be seen that he took rank from September 15 1781.

He has already procured the certificates of John Young & George Salmon as to his services and they or attached to his original declaration. He was acquainted with General Greene, General Morgan, Col. Howard, Col. Washington, General Pickens and other officers of the Army of the US with whom he served. He has no other documentary evidence than his commission.

He was born August 20, 1760. Has a record of his age at his brothers in the family Bible. Was living in Spartanburg when called into service. He always volunteered & was never drafted. The other questions are already answered in his original & amended declaration.

This applicant would here suggest that whatever doubts there may be with regard to the nature of his services during the years 1777 and 1779, under the command of Capt. Wood there can be no doubt as to the nature and activity of his services in the year 1780 & 1781 when he was almost constantly engaged in fighting the battles of his Country under her most distinguished officers, nor can there be any doubt as to the first tour of 6 months performed under Capt. John McElhaney at Princes Fort and on the frontier nor can there be any doubt as to the tour performed on marching to General Greene’s Army on the Ashley River and whilst stationed there.
Sworn to and subscribed -- October 27, 1834 before me.
S/ Robert Cox, JP
S/ William Goodlettt, X his mark

[On September 10, 1841, Richard Goodlettt, son of William and Nancy Goodlettt, filed in Greenville District, SC, on behalf of his mother, Nancy, 79, ‘in her dotage’ for her widow’s pension, stating that his parents married on February 14, 1786; that his father died June 16, 1836; that his mother has not remarried and remains the widow of William Goodlettt]

[facts in file: Nancy Goodlettt, widow, died March 25, 1843, in Greenville Dist. SC leaving the following children:

James,
Richard, and
David Goodlettt,
Mary Motlow, and
Emily M. Long.

Family Record
The Sons and Daughters of Robert Goodlettt, Sr., and wife Nancy

David born Nov. 10, 1751 (DAR Ancestor Number A046427)
Robert born Dec. 29, 1753
John born Feby 10, 1756
Ruth born June 24, 1758
William born Augt. 20, 1760
Catharine born Nov. 13, 1762
Alexander born Jan. 8, 1765
Ann born Sept. 18, 1767
Elizabeth born April 18, 1770
Jane born March 21, 1772
James born August 24, 1774
Peggy born Nov. 12, 1777

William Goodlettt was born 20 August 1760
Nancy Hooper was born January the 25th 1762 and was married to William Goodlettt February the 14,
Their sons and daughters
James born 6 Nov. 1786
John H. was born 13 Sept. 1789
Richard was born 30 December 1791
Mathew A. was born 11 Sept. 1792
David was born 20 Nov. 1794
Polly [Mary] was born Nov. 24, 1796
Amelia [Emily] was born March 22 1801]

State of South Carolina, Greenville District

Personally appeared before G F Townes the subscribing Justice Thomas Benson of the District and State aforesaid, who being first duly sworn deposes and says that he is in the 80th year of his age, that he is a native of Culpeper County Virginia and was engaged in the service of his Country in the Revolution, that he arrived in South Carolina in the year 1783 and settled within a mile of William Goodlettt late husband of Nancy Goodlettt and was well acquainted with said William Goodlettt from that time to his death which took place about 5 years ago or something over. This Deponent was present and witnessed the marriage of the widow Nancy Goodlettt then Nancy Hooper with the late husband William Goodlettt in the marriage took place on the 14th day of February 1786, which this deponent remembers particularly from the fact that he was an attendant at the marriage and was himself was subsequently married in December of the same year and in the same neighborhood.

This Deponent has heard of the said William Goodlettt receiving a pension as stated by Richard Goodlettt and though not an eyewitness to the services of said William Goodlettt in the Revolutionary War he has no doubt the correctness of the statements made as to those services by Richard Goodlettt, as this deponent was acquainted with Captain John Collins and many others who were contemporaries in the service with said William Goodlettt in all more testimony to his faithful services as a Soldier in the Revolution and good conduct.

The said William Goodlettt left the district of Spartanburg 3 years after he was married and settled in Greenville district where he lived to the day of his death his widow Nancy Goodlettt remains unmarried, and this deponent knows the fact that she is in her dotage and has lost her mind and memory to such an extent as to be unable to make a declaration in her own behalf. Richard Goodlettt is as stated by him a son of the said William Goodlettt and Nancy Goodlettt.

Sworn to and subscribed before me 10 September A.D. 1841. S/ G. F. Townes, J Q Ex. Officio
S/ Thomas Benson

I have known Major Thomas Benson all my life and have no hesitation in saying that he is a man of the highest standing and respectability. He represented this district for many years in the State Senate. I also know that Mr William Goodlettt was universally regarded as a gallant soldier in the War of the Revolution. I have heard many of the old man of the revolution blues [?] speak of him. S/ Waddy Thompson, Jr. Sworn to before me.
S/ G. F. Townes
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Thank you, thompsonhm, for creating this memorial for William Goodlett, and for your work on Find a Grave: your diligence has made valuable contributions to genealogy and the history of South Carolina, our state. 
 
Inscription:
Leut Continental Line
Revolutionary War
 
Burial:
Goodlett Family Cemetery
Marietta
Greenville County
South Carolina, USA
 
Maintained by: Vonnie L Cantrell
Originally Created by: thompsonhm
Record added: Apr 01, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 35412009
William Goodlett
Added by: keithdover2
 
William Goodlett
Added by: Charlie Porter
 
William Goodlett
Added by: Charlie Porter
 
 
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Honoring William Goodlett, a Hero who fought at the Battle of King's Mountain
- Vonnie L Cantrell
 Added: Dec. 1, 2014
Rest in that peaceful place that was once your earthly home. God bless you for being a Patriot for the fledgling colonies! Never forgotten.Your 4th Great-Grandaughter,
- Dolores Miller Pringle
 Added: Jul. 16, 2011
Peace to you 5th Great Grandfather William Goodlett.
- Pam
 Added: Jan. 2, 2011
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