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Corp John Camper
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Birth: 1804
Death: May 15, 1847

John Camper, Corp, USMC, Indian Wars, Served 1841-1845 Last Enlistment

Pennsylvania Veterans Burial Cards, 1777-1999 about John Camper
Name: John Camper
Birth Date: 1804
Death Date: 15 May 1847
Age: 43
Military Branch: Marines
Veteran of Which War: American Indian Wars
Cemetery Name: Mount Moriah Cemetery
Cemetery Location: Delaware

U.S. Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1940 about John Camper
Name: John Camper
Muster Date: Aug 1839
Enlistment Date: 4 Nov 1837
Rank: Private
Station: On Board The Us S MacEdonian

The second USS Macedonian, was a three-masted, wooden-hulled sailing frigate bearing 36-guns of the US Navy and was rebuilt from the keel of the first Macedonian at Gosport (later Norfolk) Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, beginning in 1832; and was launched and placed in service in 1836, Capt. Thomas ap Catesby Jones in command.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Macedonian_%281836%29

U.S. Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1940 about John Camper
Name: John Camper
Muster Date: Feb 1840
Enlistment Date: 4 Nov 1837
Rank: Corporal
Station: On Board U S Ship Warren

The fourth USS Warren was a second-class sloop-of-war in the United States Navy.

Warren was built at the Boston Navy Yard between 1825 and 1827 and was commissioned at her builders on 14 January 1827, Master Commandant Lawrence Kearny in command.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Warren_%281827%29

U.S. Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1940 about John Camper
Name: John Camper
Muster Date: Dec 1842
Enlistment Date: 9 Dec 1841
Rank: Corporal
Station: ?? Of The U S Ship Columbia

The first USS Columbia of the United States Navy was a three-masted, wooden-hulled sailing frigate bearing 50 guns of the US Navy.

She was built at Washington Navy Yard. Her keel was laid in 1825, but as was typical of much Navy construction during this period, she was not launched until 9 March 1836.

On her first cruise, from May 1838-June 1840 with Lieutenant George A. Magruder in command, Columbia rounded the Cape of Good Hope to become flagship of Commodore George C. Read in the East India Squadron. She returned to the United States by way of Cape Horn, becoming one of the first U.S. naval ships to circumnavigate the globe. She participated in the 1838 Second Sumatran Expedition in response to a Maylay attack on an American merchant vessel.

Columbia served as flagship of the Home Squadron from January-May 1842; cruised on Brazil Squadron from July 1842-February 1844 and in the Mediterranean Squadron from May-December 1844. She returned to the Brazil Squadron as flagship from November 1845-October 1847, and was placed in ordinary at Norfolk Navy Yard upon her return home. Except for a cruise as flagship of the Home Squadron from January 1853-March 1855, she remained at Norfolk until the outbreak of the American Civil War. Columbia was scuttled and burned by Union forces to avoid her capture by Confederates upon the surrender of Norfolk Navy Yard on 21 April 1861. Following the close of the war she was raised and sold at Norfolk on 10 October 1867.

U.S. Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1940 about John Camper
Name: John Camper
Muster Date: Mar 1843
Enlistment Date: 9 Dec 1841
Rank: Corporal
Station: ?? U S Ship Pennsylvania

USS Pennsylvania was a three-decked 140-gun ship of the line of the United States Navy, named for the state of Pennsylvania. She was the largest sailing warship ever built for the Navy, and the equivalent of a first-rate of the British Royal Navy, but her only cruise was a single trip from Delaware Bay to Chesapeake Bay.

Pennsylvania was one of the "nine ships to rate not less than 74 guns each" authorized by the US Congress on 29 April 1816. She was designed and built by Samuel Humphreys in the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Her keel was laid in September 1821, but tight budgets slowed her construction, preventing her being launched until 18 July 1837. She had three complete gun decks and a flush spar-deck and her hull was pierced for 136 guns.

Exploding shell guns were replacing solid shot by the time Pennsylvania was fitting out. A Bureau of Ordnance Gun Register for 1846 records her armament as follows:

Spar deck: two 9 pounder (4 kg) cannons and one small brass swivel.
Main deck: four 8 inch (203 mm) chambered cannons received from Norfolk in 1842, and thirty-two 32 pounder (15 kg) cannons.
Middle deck: four 8 inch chambered cannons received from Norfolk in 1842, and thirty 32 pounder cannons.
Lower deck: four 8 inch chambered cannons and 28 32 pounder cannons.

Pennsylvania shifted from her launching site to off Chester, Pennsylvania, on 29 November 1837 and was partially manned there the following day. Only 34 of her guns were noted as having been mounted on 3 December 1837. She stood downriver for New Castle, Delaware, 9 December, to receive gun carriages and other equippage before proceeding to the Norfolk Navy Yard for coppering her hull. She departed Newcastle on 20 December 1837 and discharged the Delaware pilot on the 25th. That afternoon she sailed for the Virginia Capes. She came off the Norfolk dry dock on 2 January 1838. That day her crew transferred to Columbia.

Pennsylvania remained in ordinary until 1842 when she became a receiving ship for the Norfolk Navy Yard. She remained in the yard until 20 April 1861 when she was burned to the waterline to prevent her falling into Confederate hands.

U.S. Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1940 about John Camper
Name: John Camper
Muster Date: Dec 1843
Enlistment Date: 9 Dec 1841
Rank: Corporal
Station: ??D Us Ship Boston

The fifth USS Boston, a protected cruiser, was launched 4 December 1884 by John Roach & Sons, Chester, Pennsylvania, and commissioned 2 May 1887, Captain Francis M. Ramsay in command.

Boston, being the second cruiser of the New Navy completed, was not ready for active service until 1888. She then made a cruise to Guatemala and Haiti to protect American citizens. She joined the Squadron of Evolution 30 September 1889 and cruised to the Mediterranean and South America (7 December 1889 29 July 1890), and along the east coast in 1891. Boston departed New York 24 October 1891 for the Pacific, via Cape Horn, arriving at San Francisco 2 May 1892. Except for a cruise during which she participated in the U.S. invasion[1] of the Kingdom of Hawaii (11 August 1892 10 October 1893), she remained on the west coast until laid up at Mare Island Navy Yard 4 November 1893.

Recommissioned 15 November 1895, Boston joined the Asiatic Squadron at Yokohama, Japan, 25 February 1896. She remained in the Orient protecting American interests for the next four years and during the Spanish-American War took part in the Battle of Manila Bay (1 May 1898) and the capture of Manila (13 August 1898). She remained in the Philippines assisting in their pacification until 8 June 1899.

Boston returned to San Francisco 9 August 1899 and went out of commission at Mare Island Navy Yard 15 September 1899. She remained out of commission until 11 August 1902 and then rejoined the Pacific Squadron. During 1625 June 1905 she helped represent the Navy at the Lewis and Clark Exposition at Portland, Oregon, and between 23 April and 10 May 1906 she helped care for the victims of the San Francisco earthquake and fire. She went out of commission again at Puget Sound Navy Yard 10 June 1907.
The USS Boston in drydock at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York in 1888.

From 15 June 1911 to September 1916, she served as a training vessel with the Oregon Naval Militia and was loaned to the Shipping Board (24 May 1917 June 1918). On 18 June 1918, she was recommissioned at Mare Island Navy Yard as a receiving ship and towed to Yerba Buena Island, California, where she served as a receiving ship until 1946. She was renamed Despatch, the sixth U.S. Navy ship to bear that name, on 9 August 1940, thus freeing her original name for use on the new heavy cruiser Boston (CA-69). The old ship was reclassified IX-2, 17 February 1941. Despatch was towed to sea and sunk off San Francisco 8 April 1946.

Two of Boston's 8-inch guns were placed in Hamlin Park, in Shoreline, Washington.[2] However, county records do not indicate when the guns were placed in the park or why it was done.[3]

Click Link to see all The Lost Sailors I've Found

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=vcsr&GSvcid=266131

 
 
Burial:
Mount Moriah Cemetery
Philadelphia
Philadelphia County
Pennsylvania, USA
Plot: USNH Plot 2 Row 2 Grave 10
 
Created by: Rubbings
Record added: Mar 09, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 86486979
Corp John Camper
Added by: Rubbings
 
Corp John Camper
Added by: Rubbings
 
Corp John Camper
Added by: Rubbings
 
 
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- Rubbings
 Added: Apr. 16, 2012
 
 
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