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Find all Deans in:
 • Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery
 • Lemay
 • St. Louis County
 • Missouri
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Marcellus D Dean
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Birth: 1838
Missouri, USA
Death: Jul. 4, 1865
Saint Louis
St. Louis County
Missouri, USA

Marcellus D. Dean b. Abt. 1838 MO; d. 04 JUL 1865 St. Louis, St. Louis Co., MO; buried: Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Section 45, Grave 1459, St. Louis, St. Louis Co., MO; m. 20 SEP 1855 Andrew Co., MO; Louisa D. Richards b. Abt. 1843 St. Louis, St. Louis Co., MO; d. 10 OCT 1876 St. Louis, St. Louis Co., MO; buried: (place unknown).

NOTE: Civil War military service: Marcellus enlisted in Company G, Kansas 2nd Cavalry Regiment on 10 Aug 1863. He was mustered out on 04 Jul 1865 at Jefferson Barracks, MO (died as a POW of disease).

CHILDREN:
1) Marshall DeKalb Dean b. 1856 d. 1935
2) Mary E Dean b. 1858
3) Sarah A Dean b. 1859
4) Martha Elvira Dean b. 1860 d. 1948

 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  Powell Dean (1805 - 1860)
  Amelia Simpson Dean (1815 - ____)
 
 Spouse:
  Louisa D. Richards Dean (1835 - ____)*
 
 Children:
  Marshall D Dean (1851 - 1935)*
 
 Siblings:
  Sarah Jane Dean Williams (1836 - 1903)*
  Marcellus D Dean (1838 - 1865)
  Thomas Riley Dean (1857 - 1890)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Inscription:

1459 [gravesite number]

M.D. DEAN
KAN. [Company G, Kansas 2nd Cavalry Regiment]

 
Note: PVT US Army Civil War
 
Burial:
Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery
Lemay
St. Louis County
Missouri, USA
Plot: Section 45 Site 1459
 
Maintained by: Kati McSweeney
Originally Created by: Tami Glock
Record added: Aug 03, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 55825057
Marcellus D Dean
Added by: Judy Mayberry Belford
 
Marcellus D Dean
Cemetery Photo
Added by: John "J-Cat" Griffith
 
 
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.


- Harold G. Richards
 Added: Jun. 11, 2013
LONG GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN. Irises signify "Valor" for Marcellus' military service to his country during the Civil War. To Uncle Marcellus, may you rest in eternal peace. Your loving great-great-grandniece,
- Kati McSweeney
 Added: Oct. 14, 2011
 
 
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