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Pvt Charles Edward Ablett
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Birth: 1927
Brooklyn
Kings County (Brooklyn)
New York, USA
Death: May 21, 1945
Okinawa, Japan

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Ablett.

Age 18

Charles served as a Private, U.S. Marine Corps during World War II.

He resided in Brooklyn, New York prior to the war. Charles attended Boys High School after graduating from St. Matthew's Parochial School. He was on the varsity swimming team while in high school. Is father was a member of the board of directors of the Marine Corps Fathers Association.

Charles was "Killed In Action" on Okinawa during the war and was awarded a Purple Heart.

His remains were repatriated from an overseas cemetery to here on March 19, 1949.

Military rites were conducted on March 18th by the Marine Corps Fathers Association, the Marine Corps League and the Catholic War Veterans, at the Fiarchild Chapel. A solemn requiem mass was offered Saturday at St. Matthew's R.C. Church, Eastern Parkway and Utica Ave.

Representatives of the organizations mentioned together with the 14th Signal Corps Reserves escorted the hearse down Eastern Parkway, Utica Ave, St. John's Place and Rochester Ave on the way to the cemetery.
 
 
Burial:
Holy Cross Cemetery
Brooklyn
Kings County (Brooklyn)
New York, USA
Plot: St. Augustine, Range 22, Grave 22
 
Created by: Russ Pickett
Record added: May 27, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 90849007
Pvt Charles Edward Ablett
Added by: Anonymous
 
Pvt Charles Edward Ablett
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Havens Gate 333 (inactive)
 
 
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- Russ Pickett
 Added: Dec. 20, 2012

- Russ Pickett
 Added: May. 27, 2012
 
 
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