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Dr Levi J Alleman
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Birth: Dec. 12, 1841
Death: Aug. 26, 1888

Civil War Union Army Surgeon. Served as a surgeon in the 79th United States Colored Troops, then in the 81st United States Colored Troops.

After a fatal illness of nearly a year and suffering agonies untold and that it is almost beyond belief the human frame could endure, Dr. Alleman breathed his last shortly before dark Sunday. He had been in bad health for years and was several times on the verge of the grave, but always rallied and recovered far enough to be out and around, until his late attack, under which he took to his bed about a year ago and the struggle with death lasted all this time. The news of his decease, though learned with sorrow, is yet regarded as the best, for his sufferings are over and he is at rest. Months ago the physicians gave up all hope of his recovery. Able counsel from different parts of the state agreed with the home physicians that he was beyond the help of human aid and it was only a question of how long his system would withstand the insidious disease that had its hold on him. Loving hands and tender hearts ministered to his wants and hosts of friends always stood ready to do what they could for the sufferer.
Levi J. Alleman was born in Fayette, Seneca County, New York, December 12, 1842, and was nearly 46 years old. His early life was spent on a farm, but he got his education in the academy at Waterloo, New York after going through the common schools. At the age of 17 he commenced reading medicine, and attended the lectures and took a medical course in the University of New York, in New York City. He passed a highly creditable examination and graduated in 1862, but his diploma was withheld because he was not of age, and was not granted him until the next year. After practicing in Waterloo for a time he entered the army as assistant surgeon of the First New York Veteran Cavalry, which position he held until the regiment was mustered out in 1865.
After leaving the army he turned his face westward, as many a young man did to seek a home and grow up with the country. The C. & N.W. was then laying its bands of iron across the state and Boone was not yet a town. When it was laid out he cast his lot with this city and has since been identified with its history. Recognized as an able, clear headed and skillful physician, he enjoyed a large practice, which grew as the city grew.
In 1870 he married Florence L Coleman, who is left with three children to mourn his death in the prime of manhood, when fortune smiled upon him in everything but health.
The cause of Dry Alleman's death dates back a long time—some ten or twelve years. At that time he was in robust health and was fair to live his allotted three score years and ten. Called to Council Bluffs as a consulting physician to attend a post mortem examination, he conducted the examination himself and in the course of the dissection slightly scratched himself. This insignificant wound ruined his health; for he became inoculated with poison from the corpse. A long sickness followed and he never was a well man after that. Though able to attend to his practice he was frequently ill for weeks at a time, and each attack left his system less able to endure the strain than the former. Two years ago he was confined to his bed for a long time and one morning his death was reported. But his constitution, originally strong, helped him endure what another man would have succumbed under. At last the last stage came and he took first to his room and then to his bed last fall. There was a difference of opinion among physicians as to the disease he was suffering from; some saying it was Bright's disease while others called it ossification of the veins. During the winter and spring he gradually sank, and long ago the physicians, while they differed as to the disease, agreed that the case was hopeless. For months he has been in a pitiable state, intense suffering necessitating his being kept continually under the influence of morphine. For a long time he has been practically dead to the world, though still breathing. Death was a relief.
Dr. Alleman was a man of strong individuality and decided opinions. This made him both friends and enemies, as is the case with such men. But friend and enemy alike admired the rugged honesty and independences of the man, and his early removal from the field of usefulness is universally regretted. Socially he was a genial, pleasant man and his neighbors mourn with the family. He always enjoyed the utmost confidence of the families he attended and though arbitrary, almost tyrannical, in the sick room he was always called again when a physician was needed, for it was known he could be depended on to correctly diagnose his case and skillfully carry his patient through.
But a few short years ago Dr. Alleman and his family could have been pointed out as one of the happiest in town. Enjoying a large and remunerative practice with a model home, his children growing up around him, there seemed little for him or his family to wish for until sickness laid him low.
The sympathy of the community goes out to the widow and her fatherless children.
 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Flora L Colman Alleman (1852 - 1942)*
 
 Children:
  Grace B Alleman (1873 - 1959)*
  George N Alleman (1876 - 1946)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Linwood Park Cemetery
Boone
Boone County
Iowa, USA
 
Created by: Cathy
Record added: Apr 23, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 36222688
Dr Levi J Alleman
Added by: Cathy
 
Dr Levi J Alleman
Added by: Cathy
 
Dr Levi J Alleman
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Gerhardt Leffler
 
 
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Companion #05793 - Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the U.S.
- Jeffry Burden
 Added: Sep. 7, 2012
Levi served as an asst surgeon in the 1st New York Cavalry and the 81st United States Colored Infantry during the Civil War
- Tom Mauer
 Added: May. 24, 2010
 
 
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