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Esther Whiting
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Birth: 1788
West Fryeburg
Oxford County
Maine, USA
Death: Jan. 18, 1872
Yorkshire
Cattaraugus County
New York, USA

*
No birth record can be found for Esther, but it is most likely that she is a daughter of Moses Hutchins by a marriage prior to 1791.

There were still family connections between Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts up through southwestern Maine to Lovell, which was all still part of Massachusetts at that time. The naming of an Esther Day Whiting in 1827 might be a clue to the identity of Esther's mother.

She was married on 7 Mar 1808 at Lovell, Oxford County, Maine to James Whiting.

They had 8 children. The births of 3 of them are recorded in the vital records of Lovell, Maine:

. Levi Whiting (1808 1867)
+ sp: Chestina Eastland
. Alvina Whiting (1809)
. Esther Whiting (1811)
+ sp: John Worden
. Lydia Whiting (1813)
+ sp: Philander J. Beach
. Hannah Whiting (1820)
. William Whiting (1822)
+ sp: Sarah Cartwright
. James Whiting Jr. (1824 1891)
+ sp: Betsey E.
. Lucy Jane Whiting (1827 - 1905)
+ sp: Ephraim Woodard
 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  James Whiting (1786 - 1867)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Inscription:

ESTHER
WIFE OF
JAMES WHITING
DIED
JAN. 18, 1872.
AE. 84 YS

 
Note: TEAMWORK TRANSFER on 22 Feb 2012 with Tim Cooper
 
Burial:
McKinstry Cemetery
Delevan
Cattaraugus County
New York, USA
Plot: 84y
 
Created by: Bernna Huffman Suba
Record added: Aug 20, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 29165790
Esther Whiting
Added by: Phyllis Meyer
 
Esther Whiting
Cemetery Photo
Added by: Phyllis Meyer
 
 
Photos may be scaled.
Click on image for full size.


- Tim & Grace
 Added: Feb. 22, 2012
 
 
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