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Capt James Louis Burkhalter
Birth: Apr. 15, 1835
Allentown
Lehigh County
Pennsylvania, USA
Death: Jan. 28, 1908
Galesburg
Knox County
Illinois, USA

Captain JAMES LOUIS (LEWIS) BURKHALTER, Co. F, 86th Illinois

James L. Burkhalter was born April 15, 1835 in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, the son of David Burkhalter (1809 - 1890) and Mary Anna (Marks) Burkhalter (1813 - 1882). David Burkhalter's parents were Henry Burkhalter (1770-1835) and Barbara (Biery) Burkhalter (1782-1834).

David Burkhalter was born c. December 14, 1809 in Whitehall Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. David was married to Mary Ann (or Marienna/Mariana) Marks c. June 23, 1834/35. Mary Ann was born c. March 25, 1813 in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania.
Eleven children, seven sons and four daughters, were born David and Mary Ann. They include;
1. James Lewis (or Louis) Burkhalter, born April 15, 1835 in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania; See his biography below.

2. Henry Peter Burkhalter, born c. 1834/6 in LeHigh County, Pennsylvania. Henry died young, about Aug. 11, 1841 at the age of about 5/7. His mortal remains were the first in the family to be laid in the Saegertown Cemetery in Saegertown, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. The remains of two brothers and a sister would eventually be laid next to his. See his Find A Grave site.

3. Savina Burkhalter, born January 26, 1837 in LeHigh County, Pennsylvania; Savina was still living at home with her parents, unmarried, in 1886, never having any children; Savina died on April 15, 1916 in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois; According to her death dertificate, her father was David Burkhalter, who was born in Pennsylvania and her mother was Marienna Marks, who was born in Pennsylvania. She was a housewife and her mortal remains were returned to Crawford, Pennsylvania where they were laid to rest in the _______________ Cemetery.

4. David Franklin Burkhalter, born c. November 26, 1837/38 in LeHigh County, Pennsylvania; David remained in Pennsylvania, serving in Co. E of the 111th Regiment of Pennsylvania Infantry during the Civil War; In 1880, David was still living with his parents, unmarried; David died on April 15, 1916 in _____________, ____________ and his mortal remains were laid in the Saegertown Cemetery in Saegertown, Crawford County, Pennsylvania; See his Find A Grave site.

5. Susan E. (Burkhalter) Smith, born April 3, 1842 in Crawford County, Pennsylvania; married to William Smith (Smythe) before 1886; Susan and William are known to have had one son, William B. Smith: Susan died on November 11, 1916 in Galesburg, Knox County; Illinois. Her death certificate states she was the daughter of David Burkhalter, who was born in Pennsylvania, and Mary A. Marks, who was born in Pennsylvania. Her occupation is listed as housewife; Susan's mortal remains were laid in the Linwood Cemetery in Knox County on November 13, 1916.

6. William E. Burkhalter, born c. December 20, 1843/44 in Meadville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania; William married Clara Beard (1848 - 1911) on ___________ __, 18__ (c. 1872) and they are known to have had three children; At the time of the 1880 census, William and Clara are found in
Maquon, Knox County, Illinois;
Self William Burkhalter M 35 Pennsylvania
Wife Clara R Burkhalter F 32 Pennsylvania
Daughter Elida C Burkhalter F 3 Illinois

At the time of the 1900 census, William and Clara are found in Ward 5 of the City of Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois. They are listed as having been married 28 years;
Head William Burkhalter M Dec 1844 56 Pennsylvania
Wife Clara B Burkhalter F Feb 1848 52 Pennsylvania
Daughter Elyda Burkhalter F Aug 1876 24 Illinois
Son Wayne E Burkhalter M Jan 1881 19 Illinois
Son Ralph M Burkhalter M Mar 1885 15 Illinois

William Burkhalter died on Dec. 29, 1927 and his mortal remains were laid in the Ash Hill Section of Springdale Cemetery in Peoria, Peoria County, Illinois.

7. Marion (also sometimes spelled Marian) Burkhalter, daughter of David and Mary Ann (Marks) Burkhalter was born April 13, 1846 in Pennsylvania; Mary was still living at home with her parents, unmarried without any children as of 1880; Marion Burkhalter (spelled Burkholter on the transcribed death certificate) died on 10 Nov 1931 in Galesburg City, Knox County, Illinois. Gender listed as Female. Marital Status: ___________. Age: 85; Birth Date: 13 Apr 1846. Birthplace: Meadville, Pennsylvania. Father's Name: David Burkholter. Father's Birthplace: Pensylvania. Mother's Name: Mariana Mule. Mother's Birthplace: Pensylvania. Occupation: Housewife. Burial Date: 13 Nov 1931. Burial Place: Saegertown, Pennsylvania.

8. Wayne Burkhalter, born c. November 20, 1848 in Pennsylvania; Wayne is still living with his parents, unmarried, at the time of the 1870 census, but is not with the family in the 1880 census; Reason, Wayne died at the age of 28y, 2m and 9d on January 29, 1877 and his mortal remains were laid in the Saegertown Cemetery in Saegertown, Crawford County, Pennsylvania; See his Find A Grave site.

9. John Andrew Burkhalter, born July __, 1851 in Woodcock, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. John was married to Anna Elizabeth "Annie" Carkhuff on December 9, 1883 in Knox County, Illinois. Anna was born c. October __, 1845 in __________, ___________. One child was born to John and Anna;
A. Savina Carl Burkhalter, born January 8, 1888 in __________, __________. Savina is believed to have died c. April 10, 1959 in __________, __________.

At the time of the 1900, 1910 and 1920 census records, John, Anna and Savina are all found residing together in what is called Ward 3 of the city of Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. Following is the 1900 census;
John A Burkhalter Head M Jul 1851 49 Pennsylvania
Anna E Burkhalter Wife F Oct 1845 55 New Jersey
Savina C Burkhalter Daughter F Jan 1888 12 Illinois

Following is the 1920 census;
Name: John A Burkhalter
John A Burkhalter Head M 67 Pennsylvania
Anna E Burkhalter Wife F 74 New Jersey
Savina C Burkhalter Daughter F 31 Illinois

John Andrew Burkhalter is believed to have died on Debruary 13, 1924 in Knox County, Illinois. His mortal remains were laid in the ______________ Cemetery in ___________, Illinois.

10. Anna Euphena Burkhalter, born c. 1853/54 in Pennsylvania; Anna E. Burkhalter also moved west to Illinois, where at the time of the 1900 census, she is found, as seen below, living with her brother, James L. Burkhalter in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois.

11. Charles M. Burkhalter, born c. 1857; died at the age of 30 on July 28, 1887 and his mortal remains were laid in the Saegertown Cemetery in Saegertown, Crawford County, Pennsylvania; See his Find A Grave site.

In 1840, the Burkhalter family moved to Crawford County, Pennsylvania, where they settled in or near Meadville, Pennsylvania. Though I know they were in Crawford County, to date, I have had no luck finding the Burkhalter family in the 1850 and 1860 census records. At the time of the 1870 census, this is the way the Burkhalter family appears in Crawford County, Pennsylvania;
David Burkhalter M 60 Pennsylvania
Mary A Burkhalter F 57 Pennsylvania
David Burkhalter M 31 Pennsylvania
John Burkhalter M 18 Pennsylvania
Wayne Burkhalter M 21 Pennsylvania
Charles Burkhalter M 13 Pennsylvania
Sabina Burkhalter F 33 Pennsylvania
Mary A Burkhalter F 24 Pennsylvania
Euphena Burkhalter F 16 Pennsylvania
Willie Smith M 7 Pennsylvania

Here is the way the family appears in 1880 in Woodcock, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. David is farming;
Self David Burkhalter M 70 Pennsylvania
Wife Mary Burkhalter F 67 Pennsylvania
Daughter Savana Burkhalter F 40 Pennsylvania
Daughter Marian Burkhalter F 34 Pennsylvania
Son David Burkhalter M 38 Pennsylvania
Son Charles Burkhalter M 23 Pennsylvania

Mary Ann (Marks) Burkhalter died on December 14, 1882 in Saegertown, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. David Burkhalter died on March 23, 1890 in Saegertown, Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Their mortal remains were laid in the Lot 7 in Section 7 of the Saegertown Cemetery in Saegertown, Crawford County, Pennsylvania.

Now to continue with the biography of James L. Burkhalter;
As seen in one of the biographies below, James was the eldest in a family of seven sons and four daughters. His parents were of German descent and in their home spoke only the language of their ancestry, so their children learned no English until they were old enough to attend school. James was educated in the common schools and academy, growing up on the farm. He learned the carpenter trade and commenced the building business in 1852 and has followed it since.
James L. Burkhalter was married to Martha Ellen Adle on December 2, 1858 in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. Martha was born in 1839 in New York, the daughter of Ephraim Adle and Sarah Ann (Casler) Adle. Sarah Ann Casler's mother was Neeltje Barbero, who was married to George Casler. Neeltje had a brother named Matthias Barbero, who was the father of John Barbero. John was also a member of the 86th Illinois.
At the time of the 1840 census, Ephraim Adle and his family are found in Sterling, Cayuga County, New York, which is probably where Martha Ellen Adle was born. I have yet to find the family in 1850, but, they moved to Pennsylvania in the 1840's and must be there. At the time of the 1860 census, Ephraim and his family are found in Maquon Township, Knox County, Illinois;
Ephraim Adle M 40 New York
Sarah A Adle F 40 New York
William Adle M 11 Pennsylvania
Julia A Adle F 9 Pennsylvania
Henrietta Adle F 7 Pennsylvania
Edward Adle M 3 Illinois
Rosella Adle F 18 New York

On May 25, 1861, just over a month after Fort Sumter had been fired upon, bringing the United States into Civil War, at the age of 44, Ephraim Adle volunteered to serve as a drummer of what was to become Co. C of the 17th Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He listed his residence as Morgan, Coles County, Illinois and his place of birth as Manheim, Herkimer County, New York. He was described as being 5' 4 3/4" tall, with BROWN hair and GREY eyes and being LIGHT complected. He was married and his occupation is listed listed as CARPENTER. He was mustered in at JOLIET, ILLINOIS and served for over a year before being discharged on account of "RHEUMATISM" on NOV 11, 1862 at LA GRANGE, TENNESSEE.

Ephraim Adle, who was born c. November 1, 1818, died on December 21, 1890, while Sarah Ann (Casler) Adle, who was born c. October __, 1817/18, died on ___________ __, 1911. Their mortal remains were laid in the Maquon Cemetery in Maquon, Knox County, Illinois. See their Find A Grave site for information about their family.

Eight children were born to born to James L. Burkhalter and Martha E. (Adle) Burkhalter. They are;
1. Charles Freemont Burkhalter, born July 20, 1857/8 in Maquon, Knox County, Illinois. Charles was married to Sarah Osie (Osee/Ossa) Huffman on February 13, 1881 in Knox County, Illinois; Sarah was born on ___________ __, 18__ at __________, __________, the daughter of __________ Huffman and Sarah Jane (Simkins) Huffman. Was Charles married prior to this though as he is known to have had a son, Charles William Burkhalter in 1877. Following is a list of the children born to Charles Freemont Burkhalter;
A. Charles William Burkhalter, born May 6, 1877 in __________, __________. Charles was married at the age of 21 on May 19, 1897 to Jennie Lucas, who was also 21, in Knox County, Illinois.
B. James L. Burkhalter, born
C. Edna Desdemona Burkhalter, born July 31, 1883 in Maquon, Knox County, Illinois.
D. Euthnie A. Burkhalter
E. Susie May Burkhalter, born May 23, 1888 in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinoi.
F. Florence E. Burkhalter, born
G. Martha J. Burkhalter, born
H. Harold B. Burkhalter, born
I. Norma R. Burkhalter, born


At the time of the 1900 census, Charles and his family are found in Ward 5 of Galesburg, Galesburg Township, Knox County, Illinois;
Charles Burkhalter Head M July 1859 41 Illinois
Sarah O Burkhalter Wife F 40 California
Charles W Burkhalter Son M 23 Illinois
James L Burkhalter Son M 19 Illinois
Edna D Burkhalter Daughter F 17 Illinois
Euthnie A Burkhalter Daughter F 15 Illinois
Susie M Burkhalter Daughter F 12 Illinois
Florence E Burkhalter Daughter F 10 Illinois
Martha J Burkhalter Daughter F 7 Illinois
Harold B Burkhalter Son M 4 Illinois
Norma R Burkhalter Daughter F 1 Illinois

Charles died on May 2, 1932 in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois and his mortal remains were laid in the Linwood Cemetery in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. His death record states his father was born in MEADVILLE, PENN. Charles' occupation is listed as LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER. His mortal remains were laid in Linwood Cemetery on May 4, 1932. See his Find A Grave site for more information about him and his family.

2. Henry Lincoln Burkhalter, born c. 1860/61; married to Mary M. Roberts, who was born July __, 1870; Henry died on ____________ __, 1946 and his earthly remains were laid to rest in Linwood Cemetery, but, he too, never got a tombstone.

3. James W. Burkhalter, born c. 1862/63; died on ___________ __, 1888 at ___________, ___________; his mortal remains were laid in the _____________ Cemetery in ___________, ___________.

4. Desdemona Sibbling "Dessie" Burkhalter, born c. August __, 1866 in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois; Desdemona married Edwin A. Allen on December 27, 1894; Edwin was born c. December __, 1866; Desdemona died on December 24, 1942 in Galesburg, Illinois; Edwin died on October 2, 1958; their mortal remains were laid in the Linwood Cemetery in Galesburg, Illinois; See the Find A Grave sites of Desdemona and Edwin A. Allen for more information about them and their families.

5. John D. Burhalter, born ____________ __, 1869 in Knox County, Illinois. Listed as Norman in the 1870 census seen below. John D. Burkhalter died on ____________ __, 1892 and his mortal remains were laid in the Linwood Cemetery in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois.

6. Nellie L. Burhalter, born October __, 1871; married to William Lincoln Boutelle; Lincoln was mayor of Galesburg on his death in 1929; See his Find A Grave site for more information about their family.

7. Robert Proseus Burhalter, born ___________ __, 1873; married to Elizabeth Green; they were divorced by 1918, and he died in 1946 in California. He is the one who applied for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution.

Getting back to the Adle's, Sarah Ann Adle, daughter of Ephraim and Sarah (Casler) lived 1841 to 1910, and is buried in the Maquon Cemetery, Knox Co, IL, next to her parents.

William Guilford Adle, 1848-1940, married Delilah E (Simkins) Benson. Delilah was the daughter of George Washington and Anneka (Weeden) Simkins, brother to Benoni Simkins. Delilah was first married to Mason Benson in 1860 in Knox County, but the marriage did not work, and then married William Adle. She died in 1875, and is buried in the Maquon Cemetery next to Dean M Simkins. Her parents George Washington Simkins died in Oct 1848, and her mother in Dec 1848. They are both buried we believe in the Maquon Cemetery as well. His Brother Benoni was the land owner and gave up 1/4 acre of his land for the Maquon Cemetery, joined in later by three neighbors who each gave up 1/4 acre of land for the Maquon Cemetery. Delilah was survived by daughter, Albertina, who married Jacob Oliver Southard. Also Rose Zellen Benson, 1861-1939, who married William Spillman 1858-1939. And Justin Edward Benson 1866-1941, and with wife Margaret, buried in St. Joseph Cemetery, Galesburg, IL.
Julia Ann Adle 1850-1947, wife of William Gabriel. William served in Co. G, Illinois 83rd Infantry and lived 1845 to 1924. They are buried in Exeter, Fillmore Co, Neb.


8. Alvin P. Burkhalter, born c. January __, 1878; believed to have died before 1878. Alvin Potter Burkhalter was born in 1878 and died in 1945. He married Alice Jeanette Beason, had five children, and later married Eunice Knight Owens in 1931. He died in 1945 in Canton, Fulton Co, IL, and is buried in Linwood Cemetery, Knox Co, IL.

In July of 1862, with the Civil war over a year old, James made the decision to raise a company of Maquon area men for service in the Union Army. Once word got out, John A. Freemole (Freemold), Adrian Humphrey, Barnett E. Haines, Franklin L. McVay and Josiah Waddle all volunteered to serve in his company before James could even begin actively recruiting.

ILLINOIS CIVIL WAR DETAIL REPORT
Name BURKHALTER, JAMES L
Rank CPT Company F Unit 86 IL US INF

Personal Characteristics
Residence MAQUON, KNOX CO, IL Age N/A Height 6' Hair BROWN
Eyes BLUE Complexion FAIR Marital Status MARRIED Occupation JOINER
Nativity ALLEN, PA

Service Record
Joined When N/A Joined Where N/A
Joined By Whom N/A Period 3 YRS
Muster In AUG 27, 1862 Muster In Where PEORIA, IL
Muster In By Whom N/A Muster Out JUN 6, 1865
Muster Out Where WASHINGTON, DC Muster Out By Whom LT SCROGGS
Remarks N/A

James had a recruiting office set up by the end of July in Maquon and by the middle of August, James had about 100 volunteers from the Maquon area.
Burkhalter led the Maquon company into Peoria, where they went into camp at Camp Lyon, near present day Glen Oak Park. There on August 27, 1862, he was elected by the men of the Maquon company to be their Captain and Captain Burkhalter and 93 of his volunteers were mustered in as Co. F of the 86th Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry.
On September 7, 1862, the men of the 85th & 86th Illinois marched of the gates of Camp Lyon, Capt. James L. Burkhalter leading Co. F, through the streets of Peoria, with much fanfare, and boarded a train bound for Camp Joe Holt, Jeffersonville, Indiana. Three weeks later, the men of the 85th & 86th were in the field in Kentucky as part of Col. Daniel McCook's Brigade, in pursuit of Confederate troops. On Oct. 8, 1862, the men of McCook's Brigade were engaged with those troops in the Battle of Perryville, Kentucky. Fourteen men from the 86th Illinois were killed or wounded during the Battle of Perryville. Though no man from Co. F is believed to have been among the casualties, there would be many more casualties in the coming years, and Co. F wouldn't fare so well later.
After the Union victory at Perryville, the Confederate Army withdrew from Kentucky and McCook's Brigade marched on to Nashville, Tennessee, where they went into winter camp.
During these next two and a half years, the men of the 86th served in Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and North Carolina. During all of this time, James would lead the men of the Maquon company and was witness to and a participant in numerous battles and skirmishes, some of the bloodiest fighting in the Western Theatre of the war, including the Battles of Chicakamauga, Georgia; Resaca, Georgia; Rome, Georgia, Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia; Peach Tree Creek, Georgia; Jonesboro, Georgia; to name a few and marched with Sherman to the Sea. As the months went on he was there to see the ranks thin. No man from Co. F is believed to have been killed or wounded during the Battles of Chickamauga or Resaca, either, but on May 17, 1864, the luck of Company F ran out.
After the Battle of Resaca, on May 16, 1864, the men of McCook's Briagade pursued the retreating Confederates in the direction of Rome, Georgia. On the morning of May 17, 1864, McCook's Brigade continued their pursuit of the retreating Confederates. About 5:30 P.M., the 2nd Division of the 14th Army Corps, commanded by Brigadier General Jefferson C. Davis, of which McCook's 3rd Brigade was a part, ran into those Confederates, who had halted their retreat about two miles north of Rome, Georgia, where they had built fortifications to make a stand. McCook's 3rd Brigade was deployed on the left, or east, side of the road. In his diary, Captain James L. Burkhalter described the battle in the following way.
"It was about half past five, when we encountered the enemy in force, outside their fortification. Dispositions were immediately made to give them battle and, if possible, to push them across the Oostanaula River, yet save for ourselves the bridge across the stream. We engaged the Rebels on the north side of Rome. Our men were very excited and thanks to the inefficiency of our field officers, became almost beyond control. As the 1st Brigade had the advance, it was deployed on the right of the road and our brigade (3rd) on the left, where after some exchange of fire, we managed to drive the enemy back for some little distance. In the meantime, the 1st Brigade had moved by the right flank, with their right thrown forward so as to flank the rebels on their left and give room for the 2nd Brigade to form on our immediate right and between us and the 1st Brigade. While in this position, the enemy counter-attacked in considerable force on the front of our brigade. This rebel jab hurt and gave rise to great excitement in our ranks and quite a bit of wavering backward and forward, amid great volleys of musketry. During this bedlam, our brigade lost many men. From my company, I lost John Vogler, John Wesley McCullough killed, James McNaughton and William M. Gardner wounded. In the regiment, five men were killed and twelve severely wounded."
Then five weeks later on June 27, 1864, McCook's Brigade took a pounding during the assault of the Confederate works on Cheatham Hill during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia. Of that day, Captain James L. Burkhalter wrote;
"Monday, June 27, 1864
Now it is Monday and a most beautiful day, with every prospect of becoming intensely hot. signed a quartermaster's receipt quite early, for more spades, pick axes and axe handles. Then I sat back for a moment to enjoy the scene. Scarcely a leaf is astir, nor a musket fired. The sun rose clear and splendid, with not a cloud to mar the blue sky. Our only thought is of the happy hours of peace and contentment which stretch ahead for us, we hope, at least one more day.
Seven a.m.
A different fate is in store for many of us for we are destined to die and be blind to tomorrow's sum which will rise above a terrible carnage - that which has gone on for the last fifty days, virtually without pause.
Just now, the Sergeant Major of our regiment brought an order for all the commissioned officers to assemble at regimental headquarters. There we were informed by the Lieutenant-Colonel commanding, that our brigade is ordered to charge the rebel works. so much for the foolish dream of our soldiers who thought that our few days in reserve presaged a new status as a pet brigade. Pet my foot. Rested for the slaughter would be more like it.
It was exactly eight a.m. when the Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding gave us a detailed statement of the prospects and intentions, then bade us inform our commands, as well as also to get ready for the impending conflict. The stupidity of this order is enough to paralyze me. However, I obeyed the orders so far as related to getting ready. This amounted to having plenty of ammunition, a musket, and to divest the men of all surplus baggage and equipment.
But the role of Judas is more than I can swallow and must here acknowledge myself as altogether too skeptical, to have the least confidence in the success of the enterprise. I think it far better not to give the plan of operation to my men, lest I gag on my words and reveal that I have the horrors, which, in turn, would give them the horrors, too. I consider the folly of this undertaking of itself sufficient notice for their own peace of mind.
So the minutes passed.
Regiment formed in front of the 4th Army Corps in four lines deep, to charge the enemy works. There was a moment of hideous silence among the men. Then, at a given signal of artillery, the entire line moved off at quick time with fixed bayonets, until we passed our outer skirmisher's works. There we took up the Double Quick and struck up the yell and raced straight for the Rebel works - all giving every promise of success.
Then colonel McCook was wounded and fell. It was a desperate encounter and frightful.
We were beaten back.
The men rallied and made a second assault under a galling southern fire. We advanced to within twenty steps of the rebel works.
We were beaten back.
We retreated to about forty paces from the works and concentrated a heavy fire on the rebels. The shooting did succeed in keeping them down, while we constructed breastworks in the rear of first line of protection. But the misery of that loss, the wretched failure, it stuck in my throat. I became entirely outdone and overheated, and went to the rear, where I remained until next morning."

Captain James L. Burkhalter was there with the surviving members of the 86th when the war came to an end. They then marched on toe Washington, D. C., where in May of 1865, they marched down Pennsylvania Avenue on the 2nd day of the Grand Review. On June 6, 1865, the surviving members of the 86th Illinois were mustered out of the service. Of the 93 volunteers who were mustered in with him on August 27, 1862 back in Peoria, Illinois, only about 40 remained.
The surviving members of the 86th Illinois were then put on a train bound for Chicago, Illinois, where they received their final pay and were discharged. By the end of June of 1865, the surviving members of the 86th Illinois were back home with their families in Central Illinois.

At the time of the 1870 census, the Burkhalters are found in Knox County, Illinois;
Jas L Burkhalter M 35 Pennsylvania
Martha Burkhalter F 30 New York
Charles F Burkhalter M 10 Illinois
Lincoln H Burkhalter M 9 Illinois
James W Burkhalter M 7 Illinois
Desdemonia Burkhalter F 4 Illinois
Norman Burkhalter M 1 Illinois
Henrietta Adle F 18 Pennsylvania

From the 1878 Knox County History;
Burkhalter, James L., Civil War Vet, County Treasurer, is the son of David and Mary A. Marks Burkhalter, of Pennsylvania; was born in Lehigh co., Pa., April 15, 1835. Educated in common schools and academy, and reared on a farm. He learned the carpenter trade and commenced the building business in 1852 and has followed it since; came too Knox county in April, 1856. Was married too Martha E. Adle November 02, 1858, who had borne him eight children, six living. In 1862 he recruited a company for the Union army; commenced July 23, completed August 10th; was chosen Captain and kept recruiting until he raised nearly two companies. His was the first recruiting commission obtained by a Knox county man. He was often detailed in various staff positions, much of the time in charge of sappers and miners. During his last year he served as Assistant Adjutant General, and always received favorable mention in General Buell's reports; for meritorious services at Beatonsville, North Carolina, was promoted too Major; was with Sherman on his march too the sea. He is a Republican, and was elected Treasurer of Knox County in 1875, and re-elected in 1877. Residence Maquon."

At the time of the 1880 census, James L. Burkhalter and his family are found residing in Maquon, Illinois in Knox County. He is listed as the County Treasurer;
James L Burkhalter Self M 45 Pennsylvania
Martha E Burkhalter Wife F 41 New York
Henry L Burkhalter Son M 19 Illinois
James W Burkhalter Son M 17 Illinois
Desdemona Burkhalter Daughter F 13 Illinois
John Burkhalter Son M 11 Illinois
Nellie Burkhalter Daughter F 9 Illinois
Robert P Burkhalter Son M 7 Illinois
Alvin P Burkhalter Son M 2 Illinois
William N Bell Other M 61 Pennsylvania
Charles Butcher Other M 19 Wisconsin

From the 1886 Knox County History;
CAPT. JAMES L. BURKHALTER, President of the Farmer's Bank of Galesburg, and Treasurer of Knox County, is the son of David and Marion (Marks) Burkhalter. He was born in Allentown, Pa., April 15, 1835, and was the eldest in a family of seven sons and four daughters. His parents were of German descent and in their home spoke only the language of their ancestry, so their children learned no English until they were old enough to attend school. The names of the brothers and sisters were Henry P., Savina, David F., Susan E., William, Mary A., Wayne, John, Anna E., and Charles M. Henry P. and Wayne are deceased; Susan E. became the wife of William Smythe and they have one son—William B.; William married Miss Clara Beard, and they are the parents of three children; John married Miss Anna Carkhuff. The balance of the children reside on the old homestead.
James L. Burkhalter was educated at the Saegerstown Academy, taught school a short time and studied law with a view to professional life. From some cause, however, he abandoned this idea and went to Meadville, Pa., and there worked at the carpenter's trade until he was 21 years of age. He landed at Galesburg in April 1856, where he prosecuted his trade until the outbreak of the Civil War. After visiting various places he settled down at Maquon, and July 18, 1862, he received a commission from Gov. Yates authorizing him to raise a company of volunteers. As recruiting officer, he raised Co. F for the 86th IL Vol. Inf. and Co G for the 83rd IL. Vol. Inf. In camp at Peoria, Aug. 27, 1862, he was placed in command of Co. F, 86th Reg, and served his country faithfully and well until June 1865. He was on the staff of Gen. Dan. McCook at the time that officer was killed, and was subsequently on the staffs of Gens. Davis and Morgan, discharging in the meantime the various duties of Provost Marshal, Adjutant-General, Inspector-General, etc. During his whole connection with the army he was never absent from the post of duty. At the siege of Atlanta, while on the staff of Gen. Morgan, and acting as one of the topographical engineers, he was captured by a guerrilla, but his Orderly, observing the situation, rushed upon the "reb" with a force that changed his victory into defeat, and in less than two minutes the whilom captor was being led captive into the lines of the Union Army. While acting as staff officer on the staff of Gen. Morgan, at Bentonville, N.C., the Captain, while carrying dispatches, was compelled to cross a swamp, wading in water up to his waist, under the fire of both armies, and, strange to say, he almost miraculously escaped unharmed.
Capt. Burkhalter left the army with the commission of Major, but, failing to muster as such, he feels that he is scarcely entitled to that rank. At the close of the war he returned to Maquon, where he was for several years engaged in the lumber business, carrying on in the meantime the work of contractor and builder, and accumulating from various sources quite a sum of money. He became a stockholder and Director in the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank in 1882, and in January following was chosen President of that concern. While a citizen of Maquon he held the office of Police Magistrate for 16 years. He was elected Treasurer of Knox County in 1875, and re-elected in 1877, 1879 and in 1882. He has long been recognized as an able Republican worker, and has represented that party as member of the County Central Committee for 12 years. He moved into Galesburg in 1884, where he has since resided.
Capt. Burkhalter is a member of the I.O.O. F. and A.F. & A.M., Eminent Commander of Galesburg Commandery, No. 8, and member of Peoria Consistory.
He was married at Maquon, Dec. 2, 1858, to Martha E. Adle, native of Genesee County, N.Y., and of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. B. have become the parents of eight children, namely: Charles F., Henry L., James, Dessie, John, Nellie, Robert, and Alvin P. Charles F. married Miss Osa Hoffman, daughter of James D. and Sarah Hoffman. They have one child, named James."

From the 1899 Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois, Knox County;
"CAPTAIN JAMES L. BURKHALTER
Captain James L. Burkhalter, son of David and Mary Ann (Marks) Burkhalter, was born in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, April 15, 1835.
The Burkhalters are Swiss and came originally from the Canton of Berne. The name, which signifies "Keeper of the Castle", is very common in Switzerland. Ulrich Burkhalter came to this country in 1732, and on August 11, took the oath of allegiance in William Penn's Colony. He purchased three hundred acres of land in Burks County (now Lehigh), in Whitehall Township, just north of Allentown. It was here that the father of Captain Burkhalter was born.
Ulrich had a son Peter, who was Captain Burkhalter's great-great-grandfather, and who possessed the landed estate of his father. He was a man of prominence. He was naturalized in 1761; was County Commissioner in 1787; was a member of the State Convention in the same year; was a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly for several terms; and was a Representative in Congress from 1791 to 1794. He was also Captain of a company of the Northampton Association, and saw active service during the Revolution in the Jerseys. Peter Burkhalter died in 1806. He had a son whose name was John Peter, and the latter had a son whose name was Henry, the grandfather of James L. Henry was the father of fourteen children, twelve of whom lived to maturity—six sons and six daughters. The third son, David, was the father of Captain Burkhalter.
Captain Burkhalter's life is full of incident and interest. Both his patriotism and his manhood have made him a man of mark. The "War Governor," Richard Yates, appointed him recruiting officer under the call of President Lincoln for 300,000 volunteers. He recruited Company "G" of the Eighty-third and Company "F" of the Eighty-sixth Illinois Volunteers. He then enlisted as a private in Company "F" and was elected Captain.
Under this rank, he commanded his company through its many campaigns. He was detailed for various other duties, such as building bridges and roads. As Prevost Marshal and later as Inspector General by appointment of General George H. Thomas, he served on staff duty under Generals McCook, Fearing, Morgan, Davis, and Slocum. He campaigned in very many different States—Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia—and was one of "Sherman's Bummers" in that famous march through Georgia to the Sea. At the close of the war, he took part in the grand review of the armies at Washington.
Alongside the Captain's military record, his civil record is worthy of mention. He had held various public offices, such as Police Magistrate and Town Clerk in Maquon, County Treasurer of Knox County for eleven consecutive years, and Supervisor from the City of Galesburg for five terms. In January, 1883, he was elected president of the Farmer's and Mechanics' Bank, which position he still holds.
His political creed is republican. He is strictly a party man. He is an uncompromising believer in republican principles, and he follows them to the end. His religious creed is broad, and his impulses are benevolent. He is a believer in the righteousness of good works."

Martha E. (Adle) Burkhalter died sometime before the 1900 census. Her mortal remains most likely lie in the Linwood Cemetery in Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois. At the time of the 1900 census, James L. Burkhalter is found residing in what is called Ward 5 of the City of Galesburg, Galesburg Township, Knox County, Illinois. He is widowed and listed as having been born in April of 1835 in Pennsylvania;
Head James L Burkhalter M 65 Pennsylvania
Son-in-law Edwin A Allen M 44 Illinois
Daughter Dessie B Allen F 34 Illinois
Godson James L Allen M 4 Illinois
Son Alvin C Burkhalter M 22 Illinois
Daughter-in-law Alice Burkhalter F 18 Illinois
Sister Anna E Burkhalter F 45 Pennsylvania

Captain James Louis Burkhalter died at his residence on W. South St, Galesburg, Knox County, Illinois at age 73 on

by Baxter B. Fite III, Tom and Nancy Gawthrop (GAG Contributor #47512913), whose email address is gawthrop.family.tree@gmail.com and Michelle Dawson, Capt. James L. Burkhalter's 3rd Great grandaughter, whose email address is mdtexas@aol.com.

(Baxter would enjoy hearing from anyone, especially descendants of the Burkhalter family, who might be able to add to the biographical material that we have on Capt. Burkhalter and the Burkhalter family. Baxter would also love to see copies of any other pictures of Capt, Burkhalter that may have survived the years, especially any more showing him in uniform from his days in the service, added to his Find A Grave site for all to see,)

 
 
Family links: 
 Parents:
  David Burkhalter (1809 - 1890)
  Mary Anna Marks Burkhalter (1812 - 1882)
 
 Spouse:
  Martha Ellen Adle Burkhalter (1839 - 1893)
 
 Children:
  Nellie L. Burkhalter Boutelle*
  Charles Freemont Burkhalter (1857 - 1932)*
  Henry Lincoln Burkhalter (1861 - 1946)*
  Desmona S. Burkhalter Allen (1866 - 1942)*
  Alvin Potter Burkhalter (1878 - 1945)*
 
 Siblings:
  Henry Peter Burkhalter (1834 - 1841)*
  James Louis Burkhalter (1835 - 1908)
  Savina Burkhalter (1837 - 1916)*
  David Franklin Burkhalter (1837 - ____)*
  David Franklin Burkhalter (1838 - 1906)*
  Susan Elizabeth Burkhalter Smith (1841 - 1916)*
  William Burkhalter (1844 - 1927)*
  Marion Burkhalter (1846 - 1931)*
  Wayne Burkhalter (1848 - 1877)*
  John Andrew Burkhalter (1851 - 1924)*
  Charles M Burkhalter (1857 - 1887)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Linwood Cemetery
Galesburg
Knox County
Illinois, USA
Plot: Block 28, Lot 12
 
Created by: Baxter B. Fite III
Record added: Nov 04, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 61128096
Capt James Louis Burkhalter
Added by: Just A Cemetery Shadow
 
Capt James Louis Burkhalter
Added by: Baxter B. Fite III
 
Capt James Louis Burkhalter
Added by: Just A Cemetery Shadow
 
 
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- Angelic Long Wilmouth
 Added: Jan. 6, 2012
 
This page is sponsored by: Baxter B. Fite III

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