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 • Skalka Sanctuary
 • Krakow
 • Malopolskie
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Czeslaw Milosz
Birth: Jun. 30, 1911
Death: Aug. 14, 2004

Polish Poet and Nobel Prize recipient 1980. Born in Seteiniai, in what is now Lithuania, he was co-founder of a literary group "Zagary" and made his literary début in 1930 when he published two volumes of poetry and worked for the Polish Radio. Spent most of WWII in Warsaw working for underground presses. In the diplomatic service of the Poland beginning in 1945, he left the communist government in 1951 moving to France where he wrote several books. Awarded Prix Littéraire Européen in 1953, then in 1960 was invited by the University of California and moved to Berkeley where he was appointed Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Remained there until Poland won freedom in 1989 and he returned home. Best-known works include "The Captive Mind," about the plight of intellectuals under communist dictatorship which brought him international fame in the early 1950s. At age 90 he was still up at night writing poems. Died at his home in Krakow, Poland. (bio by: Fred Beisser) 
 
Burial:
Skalka Sanctuary
Krakow
Malopolskie, Poland
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Fred Beisser
Record added: Aug 14, 2004
Find A Grave Memorial# 9315926
Czeslaw Milosz
Added by: Ron Moody
 
Czeslaw Milosz
Added by: Fred Beisser
 
Czeslaw Milosz
Added by: Kasia
 
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