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 • Panteón Jardín
 • Mexico City
 • Cuauhtémoc Borough
 • Distrito Federal
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Gustavo Diaz Ordaz
Birth: Mar. 12, 1911
Ciudad Serdan
Puebla, Mexico
Death: Jul. 15, 1979
Colonia Mexico
México, Mexico

President of Mexico. Diaz Ordaz served as President of Mexico from 1964 to 1970. He trained to be a lawyer and served as a supreme court president in his home state of Puebla before being elected to the Senate in 1946. In 1958 Diaz Ordaz was named interior minister. He was elected president in 1964 and was known for his "authoritarian" rule of his cabinet and the country. When student protests broke out during the 1968 Summer Olympics, Diaz Ordaz cracked down hard on them. His administration also emphasized economic development. After Diaz Ordaz left office in 1970, he served as Ambassador to Spain for a short time. (bio by: Mr. Badger Hawkeye) 
 
Family links: 
 Spouse:
  Guadalupe Borja de Diaz Ordaz (1915 - 1974)*
 
*Calculated relationship
 
Burial:
Panteón Jardín
Mexico City
Cuauhtémoc Borough
Distrito Federal, Mexico
 
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Mr. Badger Hawkeye
Record added: Feb 14, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 48111534
Gustavo Diaz Ordaz
Added by: Mr. Badger Hawkeye
 
Gustavo Diaz Ordaz
Added by: enrique navarrete
 
Gustavo Diaz Ordaz
Added by: enrique navarrete
 
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- R I P
 Added: Sep. 2, 2016

- Bunny
 Added: Jul. 16, 2016
pudrete en el infierno asqueroso dictador!!
-Anonymous
 Added: May. 9, 2016
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